Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Bio

Publications

All Publications


  • Assessing abdominoplasty aesthetics in women with eye-tracking technology-do patients see things differently? EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PLASTIC SURGERY Peterson, D. J., Gkorila, A., Azad, A. D., Patel, A. A., Boudreault, D. J., Nazerali, R. S. 2021
  • Assessing Gaze Patterns in Common Cosmetic Procedures With Eye-Tracking Technology. Annals of plastic surgery Peterson, D. J., Azad, A. D., Gkorila, A. n., Patel, A. A., Boudreault, M. S., Nazerali, R. S. 2020; 84 (5S Suppl 4): S268?S272

    Abstract

    Understanding the salient features that draw focus when assessing aesthetics is important for maximizing perceived outcomes. Eye-tracking technology provides an unbiased method for determining the features that draw attention when evaluating aesthetic plastic surgery. This study aimed to characterize viewing patterns of plastic surgery patients and laypeople when assessing facial cosmetic procedure images.Twenty women who previously underwent cosmetic procedures and twenty women without a history of cosmetic procedures were shown sixteen pairs of preprocedure and postprocedure images of patients who underwent laser resurfacing or lip augmentation. Image pairs were randomized to whether preprocedural or postprocedural images came first. Participants viewed each image until they decided upon an aesthetic rating (scored 1-10), while an eye-tracking device recorded participants' gaze.The patient group's average ratings were 8.2% higher for preprocedural images and 13.3% higher for postprocedural images (P < 0.05 for both). The patient group spent 20.4% less time viewing images but spent proportionally more time evaluating the relevant features of each procedure (41.7% vs 23.3%, P < 0.01), such as the vermillion border of the upper lip, labial commissure, or periorbital region (P < 0.05 for each). For both groups, the most common site of first fixation was the nose for laser resurfacing images (26.6%) and the labial commissure for lip augmentation images (37.7%). Both groups spent more time fixated on nasolabial folds, marionette lines, and the periorbital region when viewing pre-laser resurfacing images than postprocedural images. Overall, each group had similar viewing patterns for time to first fixation on and frequency of fixations for a particular feature.Women who previously underwent cosmetic procedures view postprocedural images more favorably and require less time to assess images, likely related to familiarity with aesthetic procedures. These women spend more time fixated on relevant features, such as the vermillion border of the upper lip, the labial commissure, and the periorbital region, than the control group. Notably, each group spent less time focused on regions associated with wrinkles, such as the marionette and periorbital areas in post-laser resurfacing images, suggesting that the procedure reduces attention-drawing features in these areas.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/SAP.0000000000002387

    View details for PubMedID 32294074

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Stanford Medicine Resources: