Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Bio

Bio


Derek Chu, M.D., is Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Pediatrics at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. He completed his medical school and residency training at the University of Pennsylvania, followed by a pediatric dermatology fellowship at UCSF. Dr. Chu's clinical interests encompass a wide array of topics within pediatric dermatology, including vascular tumors and malformations, inflammatory skin diseases, dermato-oncology, neonatal dermatology, and procedural dermatology.
Email: derekchu@stanford.edu

Clinical Focus


  • Dermatology

Academic Appointments


Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, American Academy of Dermatology (2012 - Present)
  • Member, Society for Pediatric Dermatology (2010 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship: UCSF Dept of Dermatology CA
  • Medical Education: Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania (2011) PA
  • Board Certification: American Board of Dermatology, Pediatric Dermatology (2016)
  • Board Certification, American Board of Dermatology, Pediatric Dermatology (2016)
  • Board Certification, American Board of Dermatology (2015)
  • Fellowship, University of California San Francisco, Pediatric Dermatology (2016)
  • Residency, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Dermatology (2015)
  • Internship, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Pediatrics (2012)
  • MD, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (2011)
  • BS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2007)

Publications

All Publications


  • Characteristics of melanoma in white and nonwhite children, adolescents, and young adults: Analysis of a pediatric melanoma institutional registry, 1995-2018 PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY Afanasiev, O. K., Tu, J. H., Chu, D. H., Swetter, S. M. 2019; 36 (4): 448?54

    View details for DOI 10.1111/pde.13836

    View details for Web of Science ID 000474933900017

  • Characteristics of melanoma in white and nonwhite children, adolescents, and young adults: Analysis of a pediatric melanoma institutional registry, 1995-2018. Pediatric dermatology Afanasiev, O. K., Tu, J. H., Chu, D. H., Swetter, S. M. 2019

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: To characterize clinical differences among nonwhite/multiethnic vs white children, adolescents, and young adults with melanoma or atypical melanocytic neoplasms, including atypical Spitz tumors.PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cohort of 55 patients (< 25years of age) prospectively followed from 1995 to 2018 in the Stanford Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program was analyzed for differences in clinical presentation, including skin phototype, race/ethnicity, age, sex, tumor/melanoma characteristics, and outcome.RESULTS: Seventeen patients (9 males and 8 females) were classified as nonwhite (predominantly skin phototype IV) and of Hispanic, Asian, or Black/African American ethnicity, and 38 patients (21 males and 17 females) were classified as white (predominantly phototypes I/II). Ages ranged from 6months to 24years, and median follow-up was 36months (range 1-180months). Melanomas were diagnosed in 87% of whites in our cohort, compared to 65% of nonwhites, with the remainder representing mainly atypical Spitz tumors. Lesions were usually brought to the attention of a health care provider by the patient or family (P<0.05). Compared with whites, nonwhites were more likely to present at a younger mean age (10.9years vs 15.4years, P<0.05) and with pink/clinically amelanotic tumors (59% vs 24%, P=0.02).CONCLUSIONS: This long-term prospective institutional study showed clinically relevant differences between nonwhite vs white children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with melanoma and atypical melanocytic neoplasms. Nonwhite patients presented at a younger age and had more clinically amelanotic melanocytic tumors. Increased recognition of clinical factors and risk of these tumors in nonwhites could result in earlier diagnosis.

    View details for PubMedID 30993772

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

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