School of Medicine


Showing 51-55 of 55 Results

  • Alice Ting

    Alice Ting

    Professor of Genetics, of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We develop chemogenetic and optogenetic technologies for probing and manipulating protein networks, cellular RNA, and the function of mitochondria and the mammalian brain. Our technologies draw from enzyme engineering, directed evolution, chemical biology, organic synthesis, high-resolution microscopy, genetics, and computational analysis.

  • Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Complex behavioral and neuropsychiatric phenotypes often have a strong genetic component. This genetic component is often extremely complex and difficult to dissect. The current revolution in genome technology means that we can avail ourselves to tools that make it possible for the first time to begin understanding the complex genetic and epigenetic interactions at the basis of the human mind.

  • Anne Villeneuve

    Anne Villeneuve

    Professor of Developmental Biology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanisms underlying homologous chromosome pairing, DNA recombination and chromosome remodeling during meiosis, using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an experimental system. High-resolution 3-D imaging of dynamic reorganization of chromosome architecture. Role of protease inhibitors in regulating sperm activation.

  • Douglas Vollrath

    Douglas Vollrath

    Associate Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Vollrath lab works to uncover molecular mechanisms relevant to the health and pathology of the outer retina. We study the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a cell monolayer adjacent to photoreceptors that performs a variety of tasks crucial for retinal homeostasis. Specific areas of interest include the circadian regulation of RPE phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segment tips, and how RPE metabolic dysfunction contributes to retinal degenerative diseases.

  • Monte Winslow

    Monte Winslow

    Associate Professor of Genetics and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory uses genome-wide methods to uncover alterations that drive cancer progression and metastasis in genetically-engineered mouse models of human cancers. We combine cell-culture based mechanistic studies with our ability to alter pathways of interest during tumor progression in vivo to better understand each step of metastatic spread and to uncover the therapeutic vulnerabilities of advanced cancer cells.

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