School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 153 Results

  • Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanisms of epilepsy, especially temporal lobe epilepsy.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how to make recovery faster and better after stroke.

  • Michelle Thi Cao

    Michelle Thi Cao

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Positive Airway Pressure devices for central sleep apnea

  • Steven D. Chang, MD

    Steven D. Chang, MD

    Robert C. and Jeannette Powell Neurosciences Professor and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical research includes studies in the treatment of cerebrovascular disorders, such as aneurysms and AVMs, as well as the use of radiosurgery to treat tumors and vascular malformations of the brain and spine.

    Dr. Chang is C0-Director of the Cyberknife Radiosurgery Program.

    Dr. Chang is also the head of the The Stanford Neuromolecular Innovation Program with the goal of developing new technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by neurological conditions.

  • S. Charles Cho, MD

    S. Charles Cho, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical research focused on peripheral nerve and muscle disorders. Also involved with prevention of cerebrovascular disesase in the intraoperative setting. Ongoing clincial studies include treatments for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Inflammatory Demyelinating Neuropathy and HIV neuropathic pain.

  • Robert Cowan, MD, FAAN

    Robert Cowan, MD, FAAN

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current interest focus on patient education technology and patient/physician communication with a particular emphasis on tools which increase encounter efficiency and improve outcomes. Basic research focuses on mechanisms of action in Chronic Daily Headache, with a particular emphasis on New Daily Persistent Headache. Techniques include fMRI, biomarker investigation and evoked potentials. Clinical research includes clinical trials of novel treatments for episodic and chronic headache forms.

  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology, of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Antoine de Morree

    Antoine de Morree

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms underlying neuromuscular disorders and the molecular regulation of satellite cell quiescence and activation in relation to normal aging.

  • Danielle DeSouza

    Danielle DeSouza

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio My research aims to understand the central mechanisms of chronic pain disorders such as migraine and facial pain by combining structural and functional MRI methods, sensory testing, and subjective measures of pain perception and affect. I am also interested in understanding how effective treatment strategies impact brain measures relative to changes in clinical symptoms. Other ongoing collaborative projects focus on clinical trials and translational projects to assess novel non-invasive neuromodulation approaches for the treatment of chronic pain and depression, central mechanisms of pain in individuals with chronic Lyme disease, and individual differences in hypnotizability.

    Teaching roles include Co-Director for the Neuroscience, Behavior, and Cognition (NBC) Scholarly Concentration, part of a required structured program of study in the medical student curriculum, and Co-Instructor for ANES 215, a required course in the Department of Anesthesia for medical students enrolled in the NBC Scholarly Concentration.

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