School of Medicine


Showing 51-100 of 154 Results

  • Victor W. Henderson, MD, MS

    Victor W. Henderson, MD, MS

    Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests:
    (1) Risk factors for age-associated cognitive decline and for dementia.
    (2) Therapeutic strategies to improve cognitive function in aging and in dementia.
    (3) Brain-–behavior relations as they pertain to human cognition.

  • Karen G. Hirsch, MD

    Karen G. Hirsch, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Karen G. Hirsch cares for critically ill patients with neurologic disorders in the intensive care unit and for patients with cerebrovascular disease in the inpatient stroke unit. Dr. Hirsch's research focuses on novel imaging techniques such as functional brain imaging in patients with cardiac arrest and traumatic brain injury. She also studies methods of non-invasive measurement of cerebral blood flow, oxygenation, and cerebrovascular autoregulation and how these parameters might be targeted to improve outcome in patients with neurologic injury. In the outpatient clinic, she sees patients with head injury, stroke and other neurovascular diseases in addition to patients who have been discharged from the neurological intensive care unit.

  • John Hotson

    John Hotson

    Professor (Clinical) of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The response and recovery of human visual cortex, oculomotor systems and related cognitive functions after acquired neurological disorders is a main area of interest.

  • Ting-Ting Huang

    Ting-Ting Huang

    Associate Professor (Research) of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the role of oxygen free radicals in oxidative tissue damage and degeneration. Our research tools include transgenic and knockout mice and tissue culture cells for in vitro gene expression.

  • John Huguenard

    John Huguenard

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the neuronal mechanisms that underlie synchronous oscillatory activity in the thalamus, cortex and the massively interconnected thalamocortical system. Such oscillations are related to cognitive processes, normal sleep activities and certain forms of epilepsy. Our approach is an analysis of the discrete components (cells, synapses, microcircuits) that make up thalamic and cortical circuits, and reconstitution of components into in silico computational networks.

  • Michelle L. James

    Michelle L. James

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The primary aim of my lab is to improve the diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases by developing translational molecular imaging agents for visualizing neuroimmune interactions underlying conditions such as Alzheimer?s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke.

  • Safwan Jaradeh, MD

    Safwan Jaradeh, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical interests include autonomic disorders, small fiber neuropathies and the development of effective methods of testing and treating these disorders. Prior work has focused on small fiber painful and autonomic neuropathies; syndromes of orthostatic intolerance and syncope; gastrointestinal motility dysfunction; cyclic vomiting; protacted Gastroesophageal Reflux; non-allergic rhinitis syndromes; and the relationship between the autonomic nervous system and normal or abnormal sleep. Additional areas of interest include the neurology of phonation and swallowing disorders, and peripheral nerve injury and repair.

  • Susy Jeng

    Susy Jeng

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Susy Jeng is Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology at Stanford Children?s Hospital at Stanford University. Dr. Jeng received her A.B. at Harvard College and M.D. at the University of California, San Diego. She completed her pediatrics residency at University of California, San Francisco and is board-certified in pediatrics. After practicing general pediatrics for two years, she returned to UCSF for neurology residency. Upon completion of her residencies, she joined the faculty at Stanford as a general child neurologist with a special interest in medical education. She is the site director for the Stanford medical student neurology clerkship and the pediatric neurology liaison to the Stanford pediatrics residency program.

  • Maninder P. Kaur, MD

    Maninder P. Kaur, MD

    Clinical Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Kaur is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist subspecializing in onco-neurology and vascular neurology. She is a clinical instructor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Kaur?s clinical interests include vascular neurology; neuro-oncology, with emphasis in primary and metastatic brain and spinal tumor; and complications of brain cancer and chemotherapy, including impacts on the vascular system. She has earned transcranial Doppler certification and is a registered vascular technologist. She is passionate about caring for underserved populations.

    As a clinical researcher, Dr. Kaur has explored innovations in neuro-oncological treatment modalities, including the combined use of multiple novel medication therapies with radiation for glioblastoma. She has also studied advances in endovascular treatment of pseudotumor cerebri.

    Dr. Kaur has written about alveolar hemorrhage in conjunction with lupus for the peer-reviewed journal Case Reports in Medicine. In addition, she co-authored the book chapter on neuro-oncology in Synopsis of Neurological and Psychiatric Complications of Systemic Disease. She also authored the book chapter ?Brain Edema and Corticosteroid Toxicity? in Brain Tumors: A Pocket Guide.

    Dr. Kaur has delivered presentations on topics such as the role of transcranial Doppler in predicting CAR-T cell-induced encephalopathy. She has also given a series of presentations on treatment methods for vasospasms while at the JFK-Hackensack Medical Center in Seton Hall University. Among her honors and awards, Dr. Kaur has won recognition for a poster presentation on stroke management at the Neuroimaging Conference.

    Dr. Kaur is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, Society for Neuro-Oncology, and American Society of Neuroimaging.

  • Lucas Kipp

    Lucas Kipp

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Kipp specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of neuroimmunological disorders, particularly demyelinating conditions such as multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. He is interested in translational research connecting expert MS clinicians, world-renown immunology laboratories, and advanced neuroimaging techniques to identify biomarkers of disease and treatment response.

  • Juliet Klasing Knowles

    Juliet Klasing Knowles

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am currently working in the laboratories of Drs. Michelle Monje and John Huguenard at Stanford using genetic and optogenetic models of epilepsy to study the impact of recurrent seizures on myelin. This is a potential novel mechanism contributing to epileptogenesis, cognitive dysfunction and developmental delay in children with epilepsy. Concurrently, I am conducting translational research related to white matter/myelin abnormalities in neonatal and other forms of pediatric epilepsy in collaboration with Drs. Courtney Wusthoff and Kristen Yeom of Pediatric Epilepsy and Pediatric Neuroradiology.
    This work is supported by NIH/NINDS, the American Epilepsy Society, the CURE Foundation and the Stanford Child Health Research Institute.

  • Lironn Kraler, MD

    Lironn Kraler, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Kraler is a board-certified neurologist with subspecialty training in vascular neurology, and a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Kraler is also the Associate Program Director for the Vascular Neurology Fellowship at Stanford.

    Before joining the faculty at Stanford, Dr. Kraler attended medical school at Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California where she was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha National Honor Society. She completed her residency training at Stanford Hospital where she served as chief resident, followed by her Vascular Neurology fellowship training at Stanford. She then completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at Stanford University?s Clinical Excellence Research Center (CERC) focused on addressing the high cost of care in US Hospitals.

    Her research interests include improving access and quality of population health and developing high-value innovations in care delivery that decrease the cost of care while improving the quality to patients. In addition, she has a strong interest in medical education. Dr. Kraler has received recognition for outstanding medical student teaching from the Department of Neurology.

  • Prashanth Krishnamohan, MD

    Prashanth Krishnamohan, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Krishnamohan is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist. He is a clinical assistant professor of neurology and neurological sciences and, by courtesy, of neurosurgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. In addition, he is Medical Director of the Neurosciences Service Line at Stanford Health Care ? ValleyCare and is Medical Director of its Stroke program.

    Dr. Krishnamohan excels in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological conditions. His clinical interests include the management of stroke, epilepsy, concussion, and coma. With every patient, his goal is to provide personalized care designed to optimize neurological function for the best possible clinical outcome and quality of life.

    He has published extensively on topics including innovations in stroke care quality management and measurement, rapid bedside evaluation of seizures in the ICU, and EEG metrics in comatose cardiac arrest patients. Articles by Dr. Krishnamohan have appeared in Neuroanesthesia and Neurocritical Care, Quality Management in Healthcare, Current Infectious Disease Reports, and other journals. He has presented his research findings at the annual meetings of the Neurocritical Care Society and American Academy of Neurology.
    He has authored chapters on post-concussive syndrome, stroke, and other conditions for the guidebook Ferri?s Clinical Advisor. In addition, he is a reviewer for the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, Neurohospitalist, and the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry.

    Dr. Krishnamohan has won recognition from Stanford Health Care, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Open School, the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, and PSG Institute of Medical Sciences and Research ? the latter two his alma maters.

    Dr. Krishnamohan is a member of the Neurocritical Care Society, American Academy of Neurology, and American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. He volunteers as a community health educator with numerous organizations.

  • Kathryn Kvam

    Kathryn Kvam

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kvam's research focuses on how to optimize patient-centered care, patient outcomes and organize systems of care.

  • Maarten Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Maarten Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research involves the design and conduct of clinical trials to discover new treatments for patients who have suffered a stroke. These trials span treatment of acute stroke, stroke recovery, and stroke prevention. My research in acute stroke is primarily focused on the use of advanced neuroimaging methods (CT and MRI) to select patients who are most likely to benefit from therapies aimed at restoring blood flow to the brain in patients who have suffered a stroke.

  • Scheherazade Le, MD

    Scheherazade Le, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neurophysiology, Epilepsy/EEG, Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring,Tuberous Sclerosis, Autoimmune Epilepsy/Encephalitis

  • Jin Hyung Lee

    Jin Hyung Lee

    Associate Professor of Neurology, of Neurosurgery and of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In vivo visualization and control of neural circuits

  • Christopher Lee-Messer, MD, PhD

    Christopher Lee-Messer, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My chief clinical focus is in pediatric epilepsy, especially how epilepsy affects learning and development. For my research, I background in neural development and computational neuroscience towards developing better learning algorithms and applying the latest techniques in machine learning for better diagnosis and treatment of disease.

  • Gordon Li, MD

    Gordon Li, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1.) My laboratory studies the biology of brain tumors with the goal of developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of malignant brain tumors and translating that research into clinical trials.
    2.) My clinical interests include improving surgical techniques for brain tumor surgery, immunotherapy for the treatment of glioblastoma, and novel uses for stereotactic radiosurgery.

  • Yi Li, MD, PhD

    Yi Li, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Li is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She specializes in epilepsy care and research. She has dedicated her career to advancing our understanding of the mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of epilepsy. In addition to her MD degree, she holds a PhD degree in neurology and neuroscience. She undertook PhD training to better understand epileptogenesis and to identify potential new treatments for refractory epilepsy patients.

    Dr. Li has conducted extensive research on the mechanism of epileptogenesis via a hippocampal neural stem cell pathway and on the dynamic changes of microRNA, genes, and proteins in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    She has received the Stanford Genetics and Genomics Certificate, which helped advance her knowledge of how genomic data can enhance patient management in clinical practice.

    Dr. Li has presented the findings of many aspects of her epilepsy research at meetings of the American Epilepsy Society, American Clinical Neurophysiology Society, American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, and International Conference on Function (Psychogenic) Neurological Disorders.

    She has published numerous articles on a wide range of epilepsy-related topics, including precision medicine in women with epilepsy, pregnancy outcomes of refractory epilepsy patients, and differentiation of epileptic from non-epileptic seizures. Her work has appeared in Neurology Clinical Practice, Epilepsia,Gene, Molecular Neurobiology, Neuroscience, International Journal of Molecular Medicine and elsewhere.

    Among her honors, Dr. Li has earned recognition from the American Epilepsy Society and International League Against Epilepsy. She also won a safety and quality awards scholarship from the American Academy of Neurology. She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society.

  • Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Ischemic optic neuropathy
    Stem cell transplantation
    Optic neuropathy
    Optic neuritis
    Eye movement disorders
    Reading
    Parkinson's disease
    Multiple sclerosis

  • Kathie S Lin

    Kathie S Lin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Lin practices both Neuromuscular Medicine and Comprehensive Neurology in Emeryville and Palo Alto. She has a particular interest in the diagnosis and management of neuromuscular disease including neuromuscular junction disorders, motor neuron disease, and focal neuropathy. Additionally, she is interested in medical education and developing a practical framework for teaching neurology and neurophysiology to medical students and neurology residents.

    She earned her medical degree at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine where was awarded a Dean's Scholarship and the Dr. Tryphena Humphrey Student Award in Neurology. She completed neurology residency at the Harvard Neurology Program at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston where she served as an administrative chief resident in her final year and was awarded the Michael Ronthal Resident Teaching Award. She then went on to complete her neuromuscular medicine fellowship at Stanford.

  • Frank M. Longo, MD, PhD

    Frank M. Longo, MD, PhD

    George E. and Lucy Becker Professor in Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical interests include Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease and the development of effective therapeutics for these disorders. Laboratory interests encompass the elucidation of signaling mechanisms relevant to neurodegenerative disorders and the development of novel small molecule approaches for the treatment of neurodegenerative and other neurological disorders.

  • Jaime Lopez, MD

    Jaime Lopez, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical interests are in the areas of Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring (IOM), clinical neurophysiology, electromyopgraphy and in the use of botulinum toxins in the treatment of neurologic disorders. Our IOM group’s research is in the development of new and innovative techniques for monitoring the nervous system during surgical and endovascular procedures and how these alter surgical management and patient outcomes. I am also active in formulating national IOM practice guidelines.

  • Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D.

    Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D.

    Redlich Professor, Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Multiple NIH funded projects to characterize CNS mechanisms of human pain. Comparative effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy and chronic pain self-management within the context of opioid reduction (PCORI funded). Single session pain catastrophizing treatment: comparative efficacy & mechanisms (NIH R01). Development and implementation of an open-source learning healthcare system, CHOIR (http://choir/stanford.edu), to optimize pain care and innovative research in real-world patients.

  • William J Marks

    William J Marks

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Marks received an Honors Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Marquette University and his Medical Degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He completed his neurology residency and fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Marks also holds a Master of Science in Health Care Management degree from the Harvard School of Public Health.

    Dr. Marks is Board Certified in Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology. Prior to joining the Stanford Faculty, he served as Professor of Neurology at UCSF. His clinical and research interests include movement disorders, epilepsy, neuromodulation, health technology, and health care policy.

    Dr. Marks also serves as Head of Clinical Neurology at Verily Life Sciences, formerly Google Life Sciences?a translational research and engineering organization focused on improving healthcare by applying scientific and technological advances to significant problems in health and biology. At Verily, Dr. Marks is responsible for developing and implementing strategies and initiatives that will advance the understanding of neurological disorders to ultimately improve patient outcomes.

  • Steven Lee Mcintire

    Steven Lee Mcintire

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. McIntire earned his MD from Harvard Medical School and his PhD in Neuroscience from Harvard University, where he was awarded a Frank Knox Memorial Fellowship and Carl Walter Fellowship. He then completed Neurology residency training at UCSF. He is board certified in Neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He has been named a Robert Ebert Clinical Scholar and Culpepper Medical Science Scholar. Dr. McIntire has published extensively in the fields of molecular neurobiology and neurogenetics.

    Dr. McIntire?s interests are in general/comprehensive neurology. He is also interested in medical education and the training of medical students and neurology residents.

  • Kimford Meador, MD

    Kimford Meador, MD

    Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Meador is a Professor of Neurology and Neurosciences at Stanford University, and Clinical Director, Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Center. Dr. Meador graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Applied Biology (with high honor) and received his MD from the Medical College of Georgia. After an internship at the University of Virginia and service as an officer in the Public Health Corps, he completed a residency in Neurology at the Medical College of Georgia and a fellowship in Behavioral Neurology at the University of Florida. Dr. Meador joined the faculty at the Medical College of Georgia (1984-2002) where he became the Charbonnier Professor of Neurology. He was the Chair of Neurology at Georgetown University (2002-2004), the Melvin Greer Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience at the University of Florida (2004-2008) where he served as Director of Epilepsy Program and Director of the Clinical Alzheimer Research Program, and Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics at Emory University (2008-2013) where he served as Director of Epilepsy and of Clinical Neurocience Research. He joined the faculty of Stanford University in 2013. Dr. Meador has authored over 400 peer-reviewed publications. His research interests include: cognitive mechanisms (e.g., memory and attention); cerebral lateralization; pharmacology and physiology of cognition; mechanisms of perception, consciousness and memory; EEG; epilepsy; epilepsy and pregnancy; preoperative evaluation for epilepsy surgery; intracarotid amobarbital procedure (i.e., Wada test); functional imaging; therapeutic drug trials; neurodevelopmental effects of antiepileptic drugs; psychoimmunology; behavioral disorders (e.g., aphasia, neglect, dementia); and neuropsychiatric disorders. Dr. Meador has served as the PI for a long running NIH multicenter study of pregnancy outcomes in women with epilepsy and their children. Dr. Meador has served on the editorial boards for Clinical Neurophysiology, Epilepsy and Behavior, Epilepsy Currents, Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurology, Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology, and Epilepsy.com. His honors include Resident Teaching Award Medical College of Georgia; Outstanding Young Faculty Award in Clinical Sciences Medical College of Georgia; Distinguished Faculty Award for Clinical Research Medical College of Georgia Lawrence C. McHenry History Award American Academy of Neurology; Dreifuss Abstract Award American Epilepsy Society; Fellow of the American Neurological Association; Diplomat of American Neurologic Association; past Chair of the Section of Behavioral Neurology of American Academy of Neurology; past President of Society for Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology; past President of the Society for Behavioral & Cognitive Neurology; past President of the Southern EEG & Epilepsy Society; ranking in the top 10 experts in epilepsy worldwide by Expertscape; Distinguished Alumnus Award for Professional Achievement, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University 2015; American Epilepsy Society Clinical Research Award; and named award by the American Epilepsy Society: ?Kimford J. Meador Research in Women with Epilepsy Award.?

  • Mitchell Miglis, MD

    Mitchell Miglis, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Sleep disorders in patients with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

  • Rebecca Kate Miller-Kuhlmann

    Rebecca Kate Miller-Kuhlmann

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Rebecca Miller-Kuhlmann, MD is board certified in Neurology and in Electrodiagnostic Medicine and practices as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences. She earned her MD from UCSF School of Medicine and residency and fellowship training at Stanford University. Her fellowship training in Comprehensive Clinical Neurology had primary foci in movement disorders, memory/cognitive disorders, neuromuscular medicine/EMG/NCS studies, and therapeutic applications of botulinum toxin with supplementary training in multiple sclerosis/neuroimmunology, epilepsy, and headache medicine. Her clinical focus is diagnosis and treatment of neurologic conditions with committment to maintaining a wide-breadth of knowledge in order to best treat complex patients with multiple neurologic conditions.

    As a former public school teacher, she is also passionate about medical education. She completed a health professions education pathway during medical school and earned an honors certificate in medical education from Stanford during her residency training, during which time she also served as an education chief resident for her program. She continues to deeply enjoy working with medical students and residents in the clinic as well as the classroom. She associate-directs the Neurology Block for second year medical students and in 2020 has had the privilege to begin directing the Science of Medicine course which comprises ~40% of the preclinical curriculum. She is also a graduate of the Stanford Clinical Effectiveness Leadership Program which develops skills in quality improvement and change management. She enjoys teaching and fostering quality improvement work as well as associate directing a novel communication coaching program within the Stanford Neurology Residency.

    An additional interest of importance to Dr Miller-Kuhlmann is mitigation of the epidemic of physician burnout. She is a graduate of the American Academy of Neurology's Live Well Lead Well Leadership program and has co-developed and directs a wellness program for neurology residents and fellows. She also serves as the Neurology Department Wellbeing Director for faculty through which she has worked on projects to improve wellbeing with focus on increasing efficiency of practice through close partnership with departmental quality improvement experts.

  • Michelle Monje

    Michelle Monje

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, of Pediatrics, of Pathology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Monje Lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of postnatal neurodevelopment. This includes microenvironmental influences on neural precursor cell fate choice in normal neurodevelopment and in disease states.

  • Leila Montaser Kouhsari, MD, PhD

    Leila Montaser Kouhsari, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Montaser Kouhsari is a board-certified, fellowship-trained movement disorders neurologist and clinical assistant professor at Stanford University.

    Her clinical interests include treating cognitive, motor, and non-motor impairments due to Parkinson's disease, atypical Parkinsonism (Multiple System Atrophy, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, Cortical Basal Syndrome), tremor, and ataxia. Dr. Montaser Kouhsari also assesses and manages Deep Brain Stimulations (DBS) treatment for Parkinson's disease and tremor. Her research interests include underlying mechanisms through which Parkinson's disease affects memory, executive function, and decision-making. She is also investigating the role of cognition as a biomarker for early diagnosis of movement disorders.

    Before joining Stanford University, Dr. Montaser Kouhsari was a fellow in the movement disorders center at Columbia University and Zuckerman Institute. She completed her post-doctoral training in neuroimaging of cognitive processes such as decision-making at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and her neurology residency at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. She earned her M.D. from Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS) and her Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from New York University (NYU).

    Dr. Montaser Kouhsari's work has appeared in the Journal of Neuroscience, Nature Neuroscience, Neuropsychologia, Journal of Vision, and Vision Research. She has been featured in Neurology Today news. She has presented at meetings held by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the American Neurological Association (ANA), Society for Neuroscience (SFN), and the Movement Disorders Society (MDS).

    Dr. Montaser Kouhsari has received the woman in neuroscience award to attend the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the Friends of Katzell research fellowship, and the Seaver Foundation Graduate Student award. She was honored to receive the National Institute of Health R25 training research grant before joining Stanford University.

    Dr. Montaser Kouhsari is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and Movement Disorders Society.

  • Elizabeth Mormino

    Elizabeth Mormino

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Neurology

    Bio Dr. Beth Mormino completed a PhD in Neuroscience at UC Berkeley in the laboratory of Dr. William Jagust, where she performed some of the initial studies applying Amyloid PET with the tracer PIB to clinically normal older individuals. This initial work provided evidence that the pathophysiological processes of Alzheimer?s disease begin years before clinical symptoms and are associated with subtle changes to brain regions critical for memory. During her postdoctoral fellowship with Drs. Reisa Sperling and Keith Johnson at Massachusetts General Hospital she used multimodal imaging techniques to understand longitudinal cognitive changes among individuals classified as preclinical AD. In 2017, Dr. Mormino joined the faculty at Stanford University in the department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences. Her research program focuses on combining imaging and genetics to predict cognitive trajectories over time, and the integration of novel PET scans to better understand human aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

  • Martha Morrell, MD

    Martha Morrell, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Morrell is a Clinical Professor of Neurology at Stanford University since July 2004. Before joining NeuroPace, she was the Caitlin Tynan Doyle Professor of Clinical Neurology at Columbia University and Director of the Columbia Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. Previously she was on the faculty of the Stanford University School of Medicine where she served as Director of the Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Center. A graduate of Stanford Medical School, she completed residency training in Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania, as well as fellowship training in EEG and epilepsy.

    Dr. Morrell has been actively involved in helping to bring new medical and device therapies to patients with epilepsy. Since 2004, she has been Chief Medical Officer at NeuroPace, a company that developed a responsive neurostimulator for treatment of medically uncontrolled partial seizures. She has authored or coauthored more than 150 publications.

    Service to professional societies includes member of the Board of Directors of the American Epilepsy Society, member and Chair of the Board of the Epilepsy Foundation, member of the Council of the American Neurological Association and Chair of the Epilepsy Section of the American Academy of Neurology. She is an elected Ambassador for Epilepsy of the International League Against Epilepsy and received the American Epilepsy Society?s 2007 Service Award for outstanding leadership and service. She is the current President of the American Society for Experimental Neurotherapeutics.

  • Heather E. Moss, MD, PhD

    Heather E. Moss, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinician scientist with a background in engineering, epidemiology and neuro-ophthalmology. In my research, I combine tools from these disciplines with the goal of understanding and preventing vision loss from optic nerve diseases. My focus is on papilledema, the swelling of the optic nerve head due to elevation in intracranial pressure, which we are characterizing using electrophysiological and imaging techniques. Other areas of interest are peri-operative vision loss and optic neuritis.

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