School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 262 Results

  • Akshay Chaudhari

    Akshay Chaudhari

    Instructor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Chaudhari's current research interests include developing and characterizing deep learning methodologies to augment the magnetic resonance imaging workflow. He focuses on new ultra-fast imaging methods that provide rapid and quantitative assessment of anatomy which can be used for clinical purposes as well as in research studies. He is also interested in multi-modal acquisition and analysis methods for better understanding the early degenerative processes of osteoarthritis.

  • Zhen Cheng

    Zhen Cheng

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests To develop novel molecular imaging probes and techniques for non-invasively early detection of cancer using multimodality imaging technologies including PET, SPECT, MRI, optical imaging, etc.

  • Frederick T. Chin, Ph.D.

    Frederick T. Chin, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group's primary objectives are:

    1) Novel radioligand and radiotracer development.
    We will develop novel PET (Positron Emission Tomography) imaging agents with MIPS and Stanford faculty as well as other outside collaborations including academia and pharmaceutical industry. Although my personal research interests will be to discover and design of candidate probes that target molecular targets in the brain, our group focus will primarily be on cancer biology and gene therapy. In conjunction with our state-of-the-art imaging facility, promising candidates will be evaluated by PET-CT/MR imaging in small animals and primates. Successful radioligands and/or radiotracers will be extended towards future human clinical applications.

    2) Designing new radiolabeling techniques and methodologies.
    We will aim to design new radiolabeling techniques and methodologies that may have utility for future radiopharmaceutical development in our lab and the general radiochemistry community.

    3) Radiochemistry production of routine clinical tracers.
    Since we also have many interests with many Stanford faculty and outside collaborators, our efforts will also include the routine radiochemistry production of many existing radiotracers for human and non-human use. Our routine clinical tracers will be synthesized in custom-made or commercial synthetic modules (i.e. GE TRACERlab modules) housed in lead-shielded cells and be distributed manually or automatically (i.e. Comecer Dorothea) to our imagers.

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Ultrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Heike Daldrup-Link

    Heike Daldrup-Link

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As a physician-scientist involved in the care of pediatric patients and developing novel pediatric molecular imaging technologies, my goal is to link the fields of nanotechnology and medical imaging towards more efficient diagnoses and image-guided therapies. Our research team develops novel imaging techniques for improved cancer diagnosis, for image-guided-drug delivery and for in vivo monitoring of cell therapies in children and young adults.

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-compatible remote manipulation and haptics

    3. Medical Mixed Reality. Currently being explored are methods of fusing patients and their images to potentially improve breast conserving surgery, and other conditions.

  • Guido Davidzon

    Guido Davidzon

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology - Rad/Nuclear Medicine

    Bio Dr. Guido A. Davidzon is a physician-scientist board certified in Nuclear Medicine. He is an attending physician in Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging at Stanford Health Care.

    He graduated with honors from medical school in Argentina and completed an internship at Yale University New-Haven Hospital in Connecticut. He did his residency and was chief resident at Stanford Health Care. He completed a research fellowship in mitochondrial diseases at Columbia University in New York and, a U.S. National Library of Medicine Award supported, Biomedical Informatics fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital in conjunction with a Science Masters at MIT.

    Dr. Davidzon is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University. His clinical specialties include early diagnostic imaging of cancer, coronary artery disease, and dementias using molecular probes as well as the treatment of cancer for which he employs targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy.

    Dr. Davidzon investigates the use of machine learning in medical imaging to improve clinical outcomes, he is involved in the professional Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. He serves as a peer reviewer for multiple medical journals. Dr. Davidzon is a native of Buenos Aires, Argentina and has lived in the U.S. for over a decade. He travels to Argentina frequently, with his wife and three sons.

  • Wendy DeMartini

    Wendy DeMartini

    Professor of Radiology (Breast Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Wendy DeMartini is a Professor and the Chief of the Breast Imaging Division in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. DeMartini completed her fellowship in Breast Imaging at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington. She then served as Breast Imaging faculty at the University of Washington where she became Associate Professor and Associate Director of Clinical Services, and at the University of Wisconsin where she became Professor and Chief of Breast Imaging. Her work is focused upon high quality patient care, clinical research and education.

    Dr. DeMartini has more than 100 research presentations, abstracts/publications, review articles or book chapters. Her research is directed toward the appropriate evidence-based use of imaging tests to optimize the detection and evaluation of breast cancer. She has served as an investigator on several studies of breast MRI funded by the National Cancer Institute and by the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN). Particular research topics have included the development of a pilot tool for predicting the probability of malignancy of breast MRI lesions, assessment of the impact of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on breast MRI accuracy, and evaluation of current utilization patterns of breast MRI and other emerging technologies.

    Dr. DeMartini is a highly sought-after educator. She lectures on a broad spectrum of breast imaging topics nationally and internationally, including in the Americas, Europe, Australasia and Africa. She is also the Co-Director of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Education Center Breast MRI with Biopsy Course. Dr. DeMartini is an active member of many professional organizations and committees, including in the Radiologic Society of North America, the American College of Radiology and the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI). She was elected as an SBI Fellow in 2009, and served as President of the SBI in 2017-2018.

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