School of Medicine


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  • Douglas Vollrath

    Douglas Vollrath

    Associate Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Vollrath lab works to uncover molecular mechanisms relevant to the health and pathology of the outer retina. We study the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a cell monolayer adjacent to photoreceptors that performs a variety of tasks crucial for retinal homeostasis. Specific areas of interest include the circadian regulation of RPE phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segment tips, and how RPE metabolic dysfunction contributes to retinal degenerative diseases.

  • Brian A. Wandell

    Brian A. Wandell

    Isaac and Madeline Stein Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering, of Ophthalmology and at the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Models and measures of the human visual system. The brain pathways essential for reading development. Diffusion tensor imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and computational modeling of visual perception and brain processes.

  • Sophia Ying Wang, MD

    Sophia Ying Wang, MD

    Clinical Instructor, Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I use and integrate a wide variety of data sources in my research, spanning both structured and unstructured forms, including national survey datasets, health insurance claims data, patient generated online text, and electronic health records. I investigate outcomes of treatments for glaucoma and cataract, as well as other areas of ophthalmology, while developing and applying novel methods for automated extraction of ophthalmic data from free text.

  • Sui Wang, PhD

    Sui Wang, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie retinal development and diseases. We utilize genetic and genomic tools to uncover how different types of retinal cells, including retinal neurons, glia and the vasculature, respond to developmental cues and disease insults at the epigenomic and transcriptional levels, and how they interact and collectively contribute to the integrity of the retina.

    1. Retinal cell fate specification.
    We are using genetic tools and methods, such as in vivo plasmid electroporation and CRISPR, to dissect the roles of cis-regulatory elements and transcription factors in controlling retinal cell fate specification.

    2. The multicellular responses elicited by diabetes in the retina.
    Diabetes can induce multicellular responses in the retina, including vascular lesions, glial dysfunction and neurodegeneration, all of which contribute to retinopathy. We are using diabetic rats as models to investigate the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the diabetes-induced multicellular responses, and the disease mechanisms of diabetic retinopathy.

    3. Molecular tools that allow for cell type-specific labeling and manipulation in vivo.
    Cis-regulatory elements, such as enhancers, play essential roles in directing tissue/cell type-specific and stage-specific expression. We are interested in identifying enhancers that can drive cell type-specific expression in the retina and brain, and incorporating them into plasmid or AAV based delivery systems.

  • Edward H. Wood, MD

    Edward H. Wood, MD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests http://med.stanford.edu/woodlab.html

    Edward H. Wood, MD is an assistant professor of ophthalmology practicing adult and pediatric vitreoretinal surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Wood engages in translational research with the goal of developing new therapies and approaches for patients without viable treatment options. He does so through leveraging the technologies of patient derived stem cells, optogenetics, and phenotypic drug screening in conjunction with active clinical research and surgical device development. Dr. Wood has filed numerous patents and founded several healthcare startups with the goal of improving patients? quality of life. His research interests include regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and pediatric retinal disease with the ultimate goal of pursuing basic science discoveries with potential for impactful clinical translation. His research interests are significantly inspired by his patients, and he is driven towards not only delivering the highest quality of care currently available, but also in developing the future standard of care in the field of medical retina and vitreoretinal surgery.

  • Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My translational research focuses on using autologous stem cells to recreate a patient?s ocular tissues for potential transplantation. We are generating tissue from induced pluripotent stem cells to treat limbal stem cell deficiency in patients who are bilaterally blind. By applying my background in molecular and cellular biology, stem cell biology, oculoplastic surgery, I hope to make regenerative medicine a reality for those suffering from orbital and ocular disease.

  • Charles Q. Yu, MD

    Charles Q. Yu, MD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Corneal opacity is a leading cause of blindness. Cornea transplantation is at high risk of rejection when there is pre-existing vascularization of the cornea and in pediatric patients. Cornea transplant shortage remains a worldwide problem with millions on waitlists. Our laboratory is developing multiple strategies for treatment of corneal blindness. We are testing advanced materials and designs for keratoprostheses with the goal of reducing complications and easing surgical implantation. We are also developing intraocular electronic display prostheses for bypassing cornea opacity, a novel strategy that could allow for high quality vision without corneal clarity.

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