School of Medicine


Showing 101-159 of 159 Results

  • Elizabeth Mormino

    Elizabeth Mormino

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Neurology

    Bio Dr. Beth Mormino completed a PhD in Neuroscience at UC Berkeley in the laboratory of Dr. William Jagust, where she performed some of the initial studies applying Amyloid PET with the tracer PIB to clinically normal older individuals. This initial work provided evidence that the pathophysiological processes of Alzheimer?s disease begin years before clinical symptoms and are associated with subtle changes to brain regions critical for memory. During her postdoctoral fellowship with Drs. Reisa Sperling and Keith Johnson at Massachusetts General Hospital she used multimodal imaging techniques to understand longitudinal cognitive changes among individuals classified as preclinical AD. In 2017, Dr. Mormino joined the faculty at Stanford University in the department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences. Her research program focuses on combining imaging and genetics to predict cognitive trajectories over time, and the integration of novel PET scans to better understand human aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

  • Martha Morrell, MD, PhD

    Martha Morrell, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Morrell is a Clinical Professor of Neurology at Stanford University since July 2004. Before joining NeuroPace, she was the Caitlin Tynan Doyle Professor of Clinical Neurology at Columbia University and Director of the Columbia Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. Previously she was on the faculty of the Stanford University School of Medicine where she served as Director of the Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Center. A graduate of Stanford Medical School, she completed residency training in Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania, as well as fellowship training in EEG and epilepsy.

    Dr. Morrell has been actively involved in helping to bring new medical and device therapies to patients with epilepsy. Since 2004, she has been Chief Medical Officer at NeuroPace, a company that developed a responsive neurostimulator for treatment of medically uncontrolled partial seizures. She has authored or coauthored more than 150 publications.

    Service to professional societies includes member of the Board of Directors of the American Epilepsy Society, member and Chair of the Board of the Epilepsy Foundation, member of the Council of the American Neurological Association and Chair of the Epilepsy Section of the American Academy of Neurology. She is an elected Ambassador for Epilepsy of the International League Against Epilepsy and received the American Epilepsy Society?s 2007 Service Award for outstanding leadership and service. She is the current President of the American Society for Experimental Neurotherapeutics.

  • Seema Nagpal, MD

    Seema Nagpal, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I'm a board certified neuro-oncologist who treats both primary brain tumors as well as metastatic disease to the brain and nervous system. My research concentrates on clinical trials for patients with late-stage central nervous system cancer. I have a special interest in leptomeningeal disease, a devastating complication of lung and breast cancers. I collaborate with Stanford scientists to detect this disease earlier, and with our breast and lung oncologists to improve outcomes for patients.

  • Viet Nguyen, MD

    Viet Nguyen, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Viet Nguyen's clinical practice consists of: [1] Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring (IONM): Dr. Nguyen was fellowship-trained at Stanford in Clinical Neurophysiology, with an emphasis in IONM, after which he was hired as faculty to help run Stanford's IONM service. The service uses somatosensory and motor evoked potentials (SSEP, MEP), electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) in over 1200 cases per year at SHC and LPCH, to help minimize risk in procedures that endanger the nervous system. These include surgeries and endovascular procedures for cerebral aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), carotid stenosis, brain and spinal tumors, spinal deformities (e.g. scoliosis, spinal stenosis), peripheral nerve injury and tumors, aortic aneurysms, trigeminal neuralgia, facial dystonia, and others. He has published, presented research, and lectured at national and international meetings on IONM topics, and is active in multiple professional organizations in the field, including the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society, Society of Clinical Neurologists, and American Academy of Neurology. [2] The Stanford Spasticity Clinic: Dr. Nguyen runs the Stanford Spasticity Clinic, treating patients with multiple sclerosis, stroke, cerebral palsy, or dystonia (cervical, facial, and limb) using EMG-guided botulinum toxin injections, medications, and physical/occupational therapy. [3] The Stanford Center for Concussion and TBI: Dr. Nguyen treats patients with concussion or traumatic brain injury (TBI), both non-sports and sports related, including varsity and professional athletes. He works to educate patients, families, and the public on properly recognizing and recovering from traumatic brain injuries.

  • Donald M. Olson

    Donald M. Olson

    Associate Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Epilepsy in children and adolescents. Particular interest in clinical neurophysiology (EEG and video EEG), differential diagnosis of seizures in children, and selection of patients who will benefit from epilepsy surger.

  • Sonia Partap

    Sonia Partap

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests involve the epidemiology, treatment and diagnosis of pediatric and young adult brain tumors. I am also interested in long-term neurologic effects and designing clinical trials to treat brain and spinal cord tumors.

  • Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr Parvizi completed his medical internship at Mayo Clinic and Neurology Residency at BIDMC Harvard Medical School before joining the UCLA for fellowship training in clinical neurophysiology and epilepsy. He has worked at Stanford University Medical Center since 2007 and specializes in treating patients with uncontrollable seizures. Dr. Parvizi is the principal investigator in the Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience whose research activities have been supported by National Institute of Health, National Science Foundation, and private foundations. To find out more about Dr Parvizi's scholarly activities please visit http://med.stanford.edu/parvizi-lab.html.

  • Chirag Patel, MD, PhD

    Chirag Patel, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuro-oncology, Clinical Trials, Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields), Molecular/PET Imaging, Neuroimaging, Immunotherapy, Big Data Analysis

  • Addie Peretz

    Addie Peretz

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Peretz's research interests include understanding the biological underpinnings of migraine and chronic daily headaches. She also participates in clinical trials of new headache treatments.

  • VJ Periyakoil, Geriatrics, Hospice & Palliative Medicine

    VJ Periyakoil, Geriatrics, Hospice & Palliative Medicine

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the intersection of biological, psychosocial and cultural aspects of care of persons with chronic and serious illnesses including dementia.

  • Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include the development, validation and application of functional and structural Neuroimaging techniques to be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease.

  • David Prince

    David Prince

    Edward F. and Irene Thiele Pimley Professor in Neurology and the Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Experiments examine
    1)intrinsic properties of neuronal membranes; actions of neurotransmitters that regulate neocortical and thalamic excitability
    2) chronic epileptogenesis following cortical injury; changes in intracortical connectivity and receptors;
    3) effects of early injury and activity on cortical development/maldevelopment Electrophysiological, anatomical and pharmacological techniques employed.
    4. prophylaxis of postraumatic epilepsy
    5. Neocortical interneuronal function/modulation

  • Thomas Rando, MD, PhD

    Thomas Rando, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell function, the effects of aging on skeletal muscle and skeletal muscle stem cells, and the pathogenesis and experimental therapeutics for hereditary muscle diseases, specifically the muscular dystrophies.

  • Lindsey Rasmussen

    Lindsey Rasmussen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests reside in the field of Neurocritical Care Medicine. My research focus has included inflammation following traumatic brain injury, outcome prediction after cardiac arrest, and neuro-monitoring in the pediatric intensive care setting. These interests are integrated clinically to focus on the merging of specialized neurologic monitoring and care with prognostic efforts in critically ill patients.

  • Ashley Elaine Rawls

    Ashley Elaine Rawls

    Clinical Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Ashley Rawls received her bachelor's degree in Biology at Duke University. Subsequently, she earned a master's degree in Medical Sciences with a concentration in Aging and Neuroscience at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine. She went on to obtain her medical degree from the University of Florida College of Medicine. She completed neurology residency at the Medical University of South Carolina, where she was appointed neurology Chief Resident. Dr. Rawls is currently training in the Stanford University Movement Disorders fellowship program, and hopes to continue to pursue her interests in global health and medical education.

  • Babak Razavi

    Babak Razavi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Razavi's clinical interests are in medically refractory epilepsies and using high density EEG (electroencephalogram) for better localization of seizure foci. His research areas include using engineering techniques for analyzing EEGs, medical devices for evaluation and treatment of epilepsy, and using seizures as a model for understanding consciousness.

  • Lawrence Recht, MD

    Lawrence Recht, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory focuses on two interrelated projects: (1) assessment of glioma development within the framework of the multistage model of carcinogenesis through utilization of the rodent model of ENU neurocarcinogenesis; and (2) assessment of stem cell specification and pluripotency using an embryonic stem cell model system in which neural differentiation is induced.

  • Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Reimer Lab interests

    A primary interest of our lab is to understand how nerve cells make and recycle neurotransmitters, the small molecules that they use to communicate with each other. In better defining these processes we hope to achieve our long-term goal of identifying novel sites for treatment of diseases such as epilepsy and Parkinson Disease. In our studies on neurotransmitter metabolism we have focused our efforts on transporters, a functional class of proteins that move neurotransmitters and other small molecules across membranes in cells. Transporters have many characteristics that make them excellent pharmacological targets, and not surprisingly some of the most effective treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders are directed at transporters. We are specifically focusing on two groups of transporters – vesicular neurotransmitter transporters that package neurotransmitters into vesicles for release, and glutamine transporters that shuttle glutamine, a precursor for two major neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA, to neurons from glia, the supporting cells that surround them. We are pursuing these goals through molecular and biochemical studies, and, in collaboration with the Huguenard and Prince labs, through physiological and biosensor based imaging studies to better understand how pharmacological targeting of these molecules will influence neurological disorders.

    A second interest of our lab is to define mechanism underlying the pathology of lysosomal storage disorders. Lysosomes are membrane bound acidic intracellular organelles filled with hydrolytic enzymes that normally function as recycling centers within cells by breaking down damaged cellular macromolecules. Several degenerative diseases designated as lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are associated with the accumulation of material within lysosomes. Tay-Sachs disease, Neimann-Pick disease and Gaucher disease are some of the more common LSDs. For reasons that remain incompletely understood, these diseases often affect the nervous system out of proportion to other organs. As a model for LSDs we are studying the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders. These diseases are the result of a defect in transport of sialic acid across lysosomal membranes and are associated with mutations in the gene encoding the sialic acid transporter sialin. We are using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches to better define the normal function of sialin and to determine how loss of sialin function leads to neurodevelopmental defects and neurodegeneration associated with the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders.

  • maura ruzhnikov

    maura ruzhnikov

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Child neurologist and medical geneticist focusing on the diagnosis and management of rare neurologic disorders. Specific interests are in genetic epilepsy syndromes, childhood neurodegenerative and neurometabolic diseases and undiagnosed suspected genetic conditions.

  • Sarada Sakamuri, MD

    Sarada Sakamuri, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Sarada Sakamuri specializes in neuromuscular medicine. Her interests are in peripheral nerve injury, neuromuscular ultrasound, EMG/NCS, neurogenetic disorders, clinical research, and medical education.

    Dr. Sakamuri studied psychology at Rutgers University and she graduated with Phi Beta Kappa distinction. She obtained her medical degree from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, where she lead multiple community service and medical education activities and was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha and Gold Humanism Honor Societies. She moved to the Bay Area to pursue neurology residency at Stanford and later served as chief resident. She then completed two years of fellowship in EMG/Clinical Neurophysiology and Neuromuscular Medicine and research training at Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center.

    She serves as the Co-Director of the Center for Peripheral Nerve Surgery along with neurosurgeon Dr. Thomas J. Wilson. She performs advanced evaluations of peripheral nerve conditions by integrating nerve and muscle ultrasound and neurophysiologic testing (EMG/NCS) at the bedside. She has advanced training and particular interest in ultrasound, and sits on the Neuromuscular Ultrasound Committee of the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM).

    She is board-certified in Neurology and Neuromuscular disorders by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN). She is certified in EMG/NCS by the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (ABEM).

    Dr. Sakamuri's other passion is medical education. She is the Associate Director of the Stanford Neuromuscular Medicine and Clinical Neurophysiology/EMG Fellowships. She supervises a weekly neurology resident continuity clinic and enjoys leading teaching sessions for neurology and physiatrist residents and medical students. She has also served as a clinical instructor at Jagiellonian University Medical College in Poland, and as a teaching fellow at Stanford School of Medicine.

  • Jacinda Sampson

    Jacinda Sampson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Jacinda Sampson received her MD and a PhD in biochemistry from University of Alabama at Birmingham, and completed her neurology residency and neurogenetics fellowship at the University of Utah. She served at Columbia University Medical Center prior to joining Stanford University Medical Center in 2015. Her areas of interest include myotonic dystrophies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and neurogenetic disorders such as neurofibromatosis, hereditary spastic paraparesis, spinocerebellar ataxia, among others. She is interested in clinical trials for treatment of neurogenetic disorders, and is the clinical application of next-generation genomic sequencing to genetic testing.

  • Veronica E. Santini, MD

    Veronica E. Santini, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Please see our website @ http://med.stanford.edu/neurology/divisions/md.html

  • Robert Sapolsky

    Robert Sapolsky

    John A. and Cynthia Fry Gunn Professor and Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuron death, stress, gene therapy

  • Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical interests involve inpatient and outpatient care of patients with neurovascular diseases, mostly ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. I have a particular interest in cervical artery dissection, non-atherosclerotic vasculopathies, and stroke in the young.

  • Sharon Sha, MD, MS

    Sharon Sha, MD, MS

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Sha is a Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University where she serves as the Medical Director of the Stanford Neuroscience Clinical Trials Group, Co-Director of the Huntington?s Disease Center of Excellence and Ataxia Clinic, Co-Director of the Lewy Body Disease Association Research Center of Excellence, Clinical Core Co-Leader of the Stanford Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, and Director of the Behavioral Neurology Fellowship. Her clinical time is devoted to caring for patients with Alzheimer?s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Her research is devoted to finding treatments for cognitive disorders. Her recent work focused on the safety of young plasma for the treatment of Alzheimer?s disease.

    Dr. Sha received a Master?s degree in Physiology and an MD from Georgetown University, followed by Neurology training at UCLA and Stanford University. She completed a clinical and research fellowship in Behavioral Neurology at UCSF, where she focused on identifying biomarkers for genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia and caring for patients with movement disorders with cognitive impairment.

  • Mehrdad Shamloo

    Mehrdad Shamloo

    Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The ultimate goal of the Shamloo laboratory is to rapidly advance our understanding of brain function at the molecular, cellular, circuit and behavioral levels, and to elucidate the pathological process underlying malfunction of the nervous system following injury and neurologic disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson?s disease, and autism. We have been focusing on the noradrenergic system and approaches leading to restoration of brain adrenergic signaling in these disorders.

  • Yuen So, MD, PhD

    Yuen So, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research in the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of peripheral neuropathy, myasthenia gravis, motor neuron diseases including ALS and SMA, nerve injuries and muscle diseases. Application of clinical neurophysiological methods to neurological diagnosis. Development of evidence-based medicine pertaining to the practice of neurology.

  • Ivan Soltesz

    Ivan Soltesz

    James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences

    Bio Ivan Soltesz received his doctorate in Budapest and conducted postdoctoral research at universities at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, in 1995. He became full Professor in 2003, and served as department Chair from 2006 to July 2015. He returned to Stanford in 2015 as the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His major research interest is focused on neuronal microcircuits, network oscillations, cannabinoid signaling and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy.
    His laboratory employs a combination of closely integrated experimental and theoretical techniques, including closed-loop in vivo optogenetics, paired patch clamp recordings, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from identified interneurons in awake mice, 2-photon imaging, machine learning-aided 3D video analysis of behavior, video-EEG recordings, behavioral approaches, and large-scale computational modeling methods using supercomputers. He is the author of a book on GABAergic microcircuits (Diversity in the Neuronal Machine, Oxford University Press), and editor of a book on Computational Neuroscience in Epilepsy (Academic Press/Elsevier). He co-founded the first Gordon Research Conference on the Mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and epilepsy, and taught for five years in the Ion Channels Course at Cold Springs Harbor. He has over 30 years of research experience, with over 20 years as a faculty involved in the training of graduate students (total of 16, 6 of them MD/PhDs) and postdoctoral fellows (20), many of whom received fellowship awards, K99 grants, joined prestigious residency programs and became independent faculty.

  • Kristen Steenerson

    Kristen Steenerson

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery Divisions

    Bio Kristen Steenerson is a board-certified neurologist with fellowship training in otoneurology. After graduating cum laude from Claremont McKenna College where she was honored as an All-American lacrosse defensive player, she continued on to medical school at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah. After four years of excellent training and annual ski passes, she proceeded to the Mayo Clinic in Arizona for neurology residency. There, she discovered the beauty of the Sonoran Desert as well as an unmet need in balance disorders and vertigo, motivating her to pursue a fellowship in otoneurology at Barrow Neurological Institute. She joins Stanford with positions in both Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery and Neurology with the goal of jointly addressing the junction of inner ear and brain disorders. Her specific interests include vestibular migraine, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Méničre's disease and international neurology.

  • Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Bernard and Ronni Lacroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor in Neurosurgery and Neurosciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory investigates the pathophysiology and treatment of cerebral ischemia, and methods to restore neurologic function after stroke. Treatment strategies include brain hypothermia, stem cell transplantation and optogenetic stimulation. Our clinical research develops innovative surgical, endovascular and radiosurgical approaches for treating difficult intracranial aneurysms, complex vascular malformations and occlusive disease, including Moyamoya disease, as well as stem cell transplant.

  • Lawrence Steinman, MD

    Lawrence Steinman, MD

    George A. Zimmermann Professor and Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory is dedicated to understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, particularly multiple sclerosis. We have developed several new therapies for autoimmunity, including some in Phase 2 clinical trials, as well as one approved drug, natalizumab. We have developed microarray technology for detecting autoantibodies to myelin proteins and lipids. We employ a diverse range of molecular and celluar approaches to trying to understand multiple sclerosis.

  • Thomas Sudhof

    Thomas Sudhof

    Avram Goldstein Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Information transfer at synapses mediates information processing in brain, and is impaired in many brain diseases. Thomas Südhof is interested in how synapses are formed, how presynaptic terminals release neurotransmitters at synapses, and how synapses become dysfunctional in diseases such as autism or Alzheimer's disease. To address these questions, Südhof's laboratory employs approaches ranging from biophysical studies to the electrophysiological and behavioral analyses of mutant mice.

  • Reena Thomas

    Reena Thomas

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Reena Thomas received her medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC and her PhD from the City of Hope Graduate School in Duarte, California. She completed her training as a resident in Neurology as well as her fellowship training in Neuro-Oncology at Stanford University Hospital. Her research background and interests are focused on immune based cancer therapies and chemokine signaling in glioblastoma brain tumors. She has also been involved in advanced imaging studies of glioblastoma. She is the Director of the Adult Neuro Oncology Fellowship at Stanford.

  • Zachary David Threlkeld

    Zachary David Threlkeld

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Threlkeld cares for critically ill patients with acute neurologic illness, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and epilepsy. He completed his residency training in neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, and joined the Stanford Neurocritical Care program after completing fellowship training in neurocritical care at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women?s Hospital in Boston. He has a particular clinical and research interest in traumatic brain injury. His research uses advanced imaging modalities like functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to better understand disorders of consciousness.

  • Keith Van Haren, MD

    Keith Van Haren, MD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research group is dedicated to innovating care for children with degenerative brain disorders. We are particularly focused on genetic and autoimmune disorders that cause damage to the myelin (the fatty insulation around the nerves) of the brain and spinal cord. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (genetic) and multiple sclerosis (autoimmune) are the prototypical examples of degenerative disorders of myelin and are the two disorders we study most intensively.

  • Chitra Venkatasubramanian, MBBS, MD

    Chitra Venkatasubramanian, MBBS, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in the study of the radiological characteristics and temporal profile of edema/ tissue injury in the perihematomal area around spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. I am also interested in developing protocols for emergent reversal of anticoagulation in a life-threatening hemorrhage situation.

  • Nirali Vora

    Nirali Vora

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Nirali Vora is a Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology and Neurological sciences at Stanford University. She is board certified in Adult Neurology and Vascular Neurology after completing her residency and advanced fellowship training at Stanford. She provides comprehensive care for all stroke patients, as well as hospitalized adults with acute or undiagnosed neurological conditions. She specializes in treating vascular disorders including TIA, vasculitis, dissection, venous thrombosis, and undetermined or ?cryptogenic? causes of stroke.

    Dr. Vora directs the Stanford Global Health Neurology program, through which she started the first stroke unit in Zimbabwe and gained experience in HIV neurology and other neuro-infectious diseases. Additional research interests include stroke prevention, TIA triage, eliminating disparities in health care, and neurology education. She is also the Director of the Stanford Adult Neurology Residency Program.

  • Jessica Walter

    Jessica Walter

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Walter received her MD from Georgetown University in Washington, DC. She stayed at Georgetown for her internship in Internal Medicine and then moved to New York City to complete her residency in Neurology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She went on to pursue a Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship at Rush University in Chicago, IL, training in both EEG and EMG. Due to her particular interest in Epilepsy she went on to become the first Epilepsy Fellow at Rush University. Dr. Walter provides clinical care to general neurology patients as well as patients with epilepsy and enjoys teaching residents and medical students. She also has a particular interest in dietary treatments for epilepsy and clinical research.

  • Tzu-Chieh Wang

    Tzu-Chieh Wang

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main research focus is in understanding the molecular mechanisms of axonal degeneration and subsequent failure of axonal regeneration in the CNS. Specifically I have identified a critical, common cellular pathway mediating axonal survival and degeneration following a variety of neurological injuries. Targeting this pathway presents a novel therapeutic modality to protect vulnerable nerve fibers and enhance functional recovery in many CNS diseases.

  • Yohannes Woldeamanuel

    Yohannes Woldeamanuel

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Testing the Efficacy of Regular Exercise to Manage Chronic Migraine

    2. Examining Biological Mechanisms Behind Efficacy of Exercise in Chronic Migraine Utilizing Multi-omics

    2. Understanding the Link between Clinical Phenotypes, Serum & Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers, and Neuroimaging correlates in Headache Disorders.

    3. Developing Lifestyle-Based Digital Tool for Personalized Migraine Self-Management

    4. Development and Clinical Validation of a Digital Tool for Headache Disorders

  • Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My projects focus on clinical research in newborns with, or at risk, for brain injury. I use EEG in at-risk neonates to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of risk factors that may lead to worse outcomes. I am particularly interested in neonatal seizures and how they may exacerbate perinatal brain injury with a goal to identify treatments that might protect the vulnerable brain. I am also interested in EEG in other pediatric populations, as well as medical ethics and global health.

  • Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    D. H. Chen Professor II

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Use of genetic and molecular tools to dissect immune and inflammatory pathways in Alzheimer's and neurodegeneration.

  • Yanmin Yang

    Yanmin Yang

    Associate Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Elucidate biological functions of cytoskeletal associated proteins in neurons. Define the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in null mice.

  • Jerome Yesavage

    Jerome Yesavage

    Jared and Mae Tinklenberg Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study cognitive processes and aging in our research center. Studies range from molecular biology to neuropsychology of cognitive processes.

  • Niushen Zhang

    Niushen Zhang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Niushen Zhang specializes in the treatment of headache and facial pain. Dr. Zhang has a special interest in complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of headaches and facial pain. She is the Director of the Headache Fellowship Program at Stanford.

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