School of Medicine


Showing 1-58 of 58 Results

  • Myriam Amsallem, MD PhD

    Myriam Amsallem, MD PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Myriam Amsallem MD PhD is a cardiologist specialized in cardiac imaging. Co-director of the RV analytics group at Stanford, she has an interest in heart failure, cardioimmunology and early detection of pulmonary hypertension using imaging and circulating biomarkers. She is currently working on developping novel noninvasive strategies to detect pulmonary hypertension and heart failure, including deep learning analysis of Doppler signals and 4D flow MRI. She also has a special interest in educational projects to improve the quality of imaging methodology.

  • Lisa Bruckert

    Lisa Bruckert

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cerebellar Circuitry in Development, Learning, and Clinical Conditions: While many recent studies document the importance of cerebral white matter circuitry in human development and learning, it remains unclear how circuits that connect cerebellum to the rest of the brain change with age, experience, and disease. I am interested in examining the white matter circuitry of the human cerebellum in normal development and in relation to healthy and disordered cognitive functioning.

  • Maharshi Krishna Deb

    Maharshi Krishna Deb

    Member, Maternal & Child Health Research Institute (MCHRI)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I aim to gain insights of the molecular underpinnings that are critical for the specification of human germ cells as well as the episode of epigenetic reprogramming that they undergo which is critical for their development and thereby essential for perpetual propagation of human species. Under co-mentorship of Prof. Azim Surani and Dr. Shiv Grewal,I aim to learn these lessons from this immortal lineage of human germline to identify interventions against various pediatric as well as degenerative

  • Chrysovalantou Faniku

    Chrysovalantou Faniku

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery

    Bio Dr. Chrysovalantou Faniku performed her undergraduate studies at the University of Bedfordshire in England (UK) from 2008-2012, majoring in Biomedical Sciences. She continued her Master degree in Reproductive and Developmental Biology at St George?s Medical School in London from 2012-2013. Her research focused on post-ovulatory wound repair and scarring. Dr. Faniku worked as a research assistant at King?s College London prior to pursuing a Ph.D. in Glasgow in 2014. She completed her Ph.D. in Molecular Biology in 2018. Her research focused on Cx43 and Panx1, how these are impacted by diabetes and ischemia and how they could be potential therapeutic targets for wound healing of diabetic ulcers. In 2018, Dr. Faniku started her first postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Otolaryngology working in the lab of Dr. Jon-Paul Pepper. Her project investigates the role of the hedgehog pathway in facial nerve regeneration after injury.

  • Connie Fung

    Connie Fung

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    Bio Connie received her B.S. in Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics from UCLA, where she conducted research on how the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii invades and replicates inside host cells in the lab of Dr. Peter Bradley. Subsequently, she obtained her Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from Stanford University with Dr. Manuel Amieva. Her thesis research involved the use of high-resolution microscopy to study how the bacterium Helicobacter pylori establishes and maintains persistent colonization of the gastric epithelium. Connie joined Dr. Michael Howitt's lab as a postdoctoral research fellow in 2019 and is currently investigating how tuft cells, specialized taste-chemosensory cells, modulate mucosal immunity in response to intestinal parasites.

  • Shivani Gaiha

    Shivani Gaiha

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Adolescent Medicine

    Bio Shivani is a postdoctoral research scholar in the Halpern-Felsher Lab in Adolescent Medicine. Shivani uses mixed-methods experimental and implementation research to develop and evaluate real-world public health education programs and methodologies that lead to healthy behaviors. Her current research focuses on three key areas:

    (1) Assessing youth patterns of use and perceptions about electronic cigarettes, new tobacco products and other substances;
    (2) Understanding why youth use e-cigarettes vapes as a means to cope with stress and manage mental health problems, such as depression; and
    (3) Evaluating school-based educational interventions to reduce e-cigarette use.

    In addition to research, Shivani enjoys teaching research methods and mentoring high school and college students.

    Through her Ph.D., Shivani developed and evaluated an arts-based educational program to reduce mental-health-related stigma in India. The program had a large, significant and positive effect on participants - they desired greater social proximity to people living with mental health problems. During this time, she also became interested in the intersection between mental health and substance use, a common theme in her interactions with youth. She also refined her skills in statistical analysis, study design and project management. Her interdisciplinary Ph.D. research at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine was supported by the PHFI-UKC Wellcome Trust Capacity Strengthening Award (2014-18). In 2017, she received the LSHTM Public Engagement Small Grant to strengthen school teachers? understanding of mental health problems, which resulted in a monthly column in a popular educational magazine, reaching approximately 40,000 Indian teachers every month.

    Previously, Shivani designed, implemented and evaluated health communication and behavior change initiatives at the Public Health Foundation of India from 2008-2014. She is especially passionate about designing educational public health programs to break silences around contentious public health issues, using participatory media and entertainment-education. At PHFI, she spearheaded health communication and community engagement programs aimed at changing behavior related to healthy lifestyles, sexual and reproductive health, maternal and neonatal care, menstrual hygiene, avoidable blindness and mental health. In partnership with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India and community-based organizations, she led three educational interventions: a community awareness campaign, which improved treatment-seeking behavior for mental disorders in underserved areas; a website targeting young people to improve their lifestyle; and entertainment-education-based participatory action research to improve sexual and reproductive health.

  • Elias Roth Gerrick

    Elias Roth Gerrick

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    Bio Eli received his B.S. in Microbiology and Immunology from U.C. Irvine in 2013, where he worked in the lab of Dr. Celia Goulding. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2018 in the lab of Dr. Sarah Fortune, where he studied post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Eli joined the Howitt lab at Stanford in the summer of 2018, where he is studying the influence of protozoan members of the microbiome on intestinal immunity.

  • Meghan Halley

    Meghan Halley

    Research Scholar, School of Medicine - Biomedical Ethics

    Bio I am a medical anthropologist with a background in public health and a passion for research that engages the voices of patients and families in improving population health and healthcare delivery. I am a proud Midwesterner, with a B.A. in anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a PhD and MPH from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. My broad research interests include the psychosocial dimensions of health and illness, the well-being of children and families, and medical decision-making, particularly in the context of complex illness. I also am a perpetual student of the art of grant writing, and I love supporting scientists in developing this critical skill. At the Center for Biomedical Ethics, my research examines the ethical and economic implications of genome sequencing for diagnosis of children with rare diseases and their families. My work examines the ethical implications of varying approaches to economic evaluation and their relation to reimbursement and equitable access to new genomic technologies. I am also interested in the development of new tools for measurement of the costs and benefits of new genomic technologies that reflect patient values.

  • Jing Jiang

    Jing Jiang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Jing's research work focuses on the cognitive and neural mechanisms of social communication. She received her Master degree at Beijing Normal University in 2013, where she mainly studied the unique neural underpinnings of face-to-face verbal communication using fNIRS-based hyperscanning. During her Ph.D. studies at Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin in Germany from 2013 to 2017,she combined various techniques such as fMRI, MEG and eye tracking to study neural mechanisms of one important component in social interaction: eye contact.She joined the Etkin Lab in 2017 and has specifically focused on the causal neural circuitry of emotion processing in social context using TMS-fMRI.

  • Jamie Johnston

    Jamie Johnston

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Human Anatomy

    Bio Jamie Johnston is the research and evaluation lead for the Stanford Center for Health Education's Digital MEdIC initiative and a postdoctoral fellow in the Stanford School of Medicine. Her work focuses on the use of technology to improve educational access and instructional quality in under-resourced areas, as well as how new teaching technologies can improve learning outcomes in medical education. Jamie completed her PhD in Economics of Education at the Stanford Graduate School of Education in 2017, where she was an Institute of Education Sciences (IES) doctoral fellow. Jamie also received a B.S. in Social Policy from Northwestern University, an M.P.P from the University of Chicago, and an M.A. in Economics from Stanford University.

  • Jing Li

    Jing Li

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Immunity Transplant Infection

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Autoimmune Diseases

  • Manjari Narayan

    Manjari Narayan

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics

    Bio Manjari Narayan is a postdoctoral research scholar in the School of Medicine. Her current research interests combine high dimensional statistics, network science & statistical causal inference methods to analyze changes in brain networks either longitudinally or due to experimental perturbations. She received a Ph.D in Electrical Engineering from Rice University in 2016 under the supervision of Dr. Genevera Allen and a B.S in Electrical Engineering from UIUC in 2007. Previously, she was a postdoctoral scholar in Psychiatry under the mentorship of Amit Etkin. Her dissertation work has been recognized by numerous student paper awards including the 2016 ENAR Distinguished Student Paper Award from the International Biometrics Society and the 2013 best paper travel award in Pattern Recognition in Neuroimaging.

  • David T. Paik

    David T. Paik

    Instructor, Cardiovascular Institute

    Bio Dr. David Paik is instructor working with Dr. Joseph Wu at Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. At Stanford, his focus is to utilize single-cell RNA-sequencing technology to elucidate patient-specific mechanisms of various cardiovascular diseases, characterize embryonic heart development, and optimize differentiation of iPSCs to subtypes of cardiovascular cells. Dr. Paik received his BA in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Boston University (2010) and PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology at Vanderbilt University (2015). At Vanderbilt, Dr. Paik was trained by Dr. Antonis Hatzopoulos to investigate the endogenous cardiac repair mechanisms in the adult heart following ischemic injury such as myocardial infarction. In particular, Dr. Paik focused on the role of Wnt signaling pathway on coronary vessel formation and plasticity of cardiac endothelial cells during cardiac tissue repair. During his PhD training, Dr. Paik completed HHMI/VUMC Certificate Program in Molecular Medicine, where he was supervised by his clinical mentor Dr. Douglas Sawyer to interact with congestive heart failure patients and to bridge clinical sciences with basic and translational cardiovascular research.

  • Vasiliki Rahimzadeh

    Vasiliki Rahimzadeh

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biomedical Ethics

    Bio Vasiliki (Vaso) Rahimzadeh, PhD is an applied bioethics scholar with research interests at the intersection of precision medicine, data governance and public policy.

  • Shamma Shakila Rahman

    Shamma Shakila Rahman

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Human Gene Therapy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Immunological pathophysiology of Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome

  • Ashley Rene Styczynski

    Ashley Rene Styczynski

    Postdoctoral Medical Fellow, Infectious Diseases

    Bio Ashley Styczynski, MD, MPH, is an infectious disease fellow in the Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine with research interests in epidemiology, global health, emerging infections, and antimicrobial resistance. She holds an MPH from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and an MD from University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to coming to Stanford for her infectious disease fellowship, she spent two years as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. During her time as an EIS officer, Ashley conducted outbreak investigations on Zika virus, vaccinia virus, and rabies. She is currently conducting research on perinatal transmission dynamics of antimicrobial resistant organisms and sustainable interventions to reduce transmission of infections within low-resource healthcare facilities.

  • Erin A. Vogel

    Erin A. Vogel

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, SCRDP/ Heart Disease Prevention

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Adolescent e-cigarette use, smoking in the LGBTQ+ community, social media and well-being, multiple health risk behaviors, digital interventions for substance use

  • Jinglong Wang

    Jinglong Wang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Radiation Biology

    Bio Jinglong was trained in a single-molecule lab in Institute Jacques Monod and École Normale Supérieure Paris and obtained his PhD degree from University of Paris in 2019, France. He dissected the molecular machinery of human and bacterial Non-homologous end joining, and interrogated the mechanism of SpCas9 plasticity on targeting DNA with deviant PAMs using single-molecule nanomanipulation tools. Jinglong joined the Frock lab in Jan 2020, and he is working on DSB-related chromosome topological changes and genomic interactions.

  • Marlene Helen Kennedy Wolfe

    Marlene Helen Kennedy Wolfe

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Bio Marlene is a Postdoctoral Scholar with the Woods Institute for the Environment. Her research uses environmental engineering, microbiology, and epidemiology to address complex issues in WASH and child health. She has 10 years of experience working on WASH topics in low and middle income countries and emergencies, especially in East Africa. During her PhD, she focused on the development of new approaches to assess exposure to emerging infectious challenges and interventions to interrupt transmission with a focus on handwashing. At Stanford, Marlene focuses on the relationship between WASH infrastructure in communities and institutions and disease risk in the local environment. Marlene did her doctoral training in Environmental Health at Tufts University, and holds an MSc in Epidemiology from the the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a BA in Human Biology from Stanford University.

  • Mollie Woodworth

    Mollie Woodworth

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Many types of blindness result from the neurons of the retina no longer being able to communicate with the brain due to injury or disease. In mammals, the adult retina cannot make new retinal ganglion cells (the neurons that connect the retina with the brain) to replace those that are lost. In my work, I aim to learn about normal development of retinal ganglion cells and, further, to regenerate new retinal ganglion cells if they are lost in adulthood.

  • Chien Ting Wu

    Chien Ting Wu

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Microbiology and Immunology

    Bio I started conducting research as a second-year student in college. I entered a biochemical lab to perform research and had my own project. My topic was Alzheimer's disease, and I focused on the relationship between aggregated amyloid-beta and reactive oxygen species levels in cells. I am very grateful for this particular research experience because it allowed me to realize that I am particularly interested in studying disease-associated proteins on a molecular level. Thus, these early research experiences have been invaluable in shaping my scientific interests and personality.

    I decided to pursue my graduate training straight out of college by obtaining my master?s degree. I then decided to join the Chen, I-T. Lab for my graduate research training, where I discovered that a novel recombinant protein, LZ8 cloned from Ganoderma, can inhibit the duplication of cancer cells in vitro and decrease the growth rate of tumors in vivo through regulating the p53/MDM2/mTOR signaling pathway. My findings were published in the journal Carcinogenesis. This was my first first-author paper. During this time, I learned how to become an independent scientist.

    After my master?s degree, I spent three years completing my military service as a research assistant in Academia Sinica. I worked under the supervision of Prof. Tang Tang. My research focused on the molecular mechanism of centriole duplication. In my research, I found that CEP120, a ciliopathy protein, is required to promote centriole elongation. Overexpression of CEP120 can induce overly long centrioles. This work was published in the Journal of Cell Biology. This was my second first-author paper. Because of these valuable lab experiences, I began to be fascinated by the centriole and cilium field.

    Afterwards, to better understand centriole- and cilia-related human hereditary diseases, I worked as a molecular diagnostician in a molecular diagnosis lab at Oregon Health Science University. I used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify gene mutations from ciliopathy patients. During this period, I learned how to run a complete molecular diagnosis, draw blood for running NGS, analyzing patient data, preparing patient reports and designing a novel disease panel to run NGS. This experience provided me with a new perspective and connected the things that I learned in the centriole and cilia field, from biochemistry to molecular biology to clinical diagnosis. Most importantly, this experience allowed me to realize that so many people suffer from ciliopathy disease. As a researcher, I hope to continue my research on the cilium field to help develop better clinical treatments for these patients.

    For this reason, I decided to join the Tang Tang Lab in Academia Sinica for my PhD training. The Tang Lab has a longstanding interest in understanding the mechanisms of centriole duplication and is at the forefront of research in the primary cilium field. In this period, I found that Myosin-Va, a motor protein, is required for preciliary vesicle trafficking during the early stage of ciliogenesis. This research was published in Nature Cell Biology.
    Thus, my experiences have allowed me to develop my scientific interests and to realize that I would one day like to run my own laboratory and research program focusing on cilium-related diseases.

  • Hua Xie

    Hua Xie

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio I am a postdoc scholar at Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. I am interested in studying brain dynamics, measured using fMRI, EEG and fNIRs using manifold learning, machine learning and pattern recognition, and discovering link between brain dynamics to psychiatric diseases.

  • Fan Yang

    Fan Yang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    Bio Fan Yang has a broad background in Computational Biology, Genomics, Oncology, Immunology, and their intersections. She did her Ph.D. at the University of Toronto and participated in several inspiring and cutting-edge projects focusing on assessing the functionality and immunogenicity of human genomic variants both experimentally and computationally. She joined the Boyd lab at Stanford for her postdoctoral work to study the B cell and T cell repertoires in human infectious diseases and vaccine responses.

  • Mahboubeh Yazdanifar

    Mahboubeh Yazdanifar

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio Bachelor's degree in Animal Biology, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran (2007)
    Master's degree in Medical Immunology, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran (2010)
    Ph.D. degree in Biology - Cancer Immunology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, NC, USA (2019)
    Postdoctoral Scholar at Stanford University (2019 - present)

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: