School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 261 Results

  • Raag Airan

    Raag Airan

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our goal is to develop and clinically implement new technologies for high-precision and noninvasive intervention upon the nervous system. Every few millimeters of the brain is functionally distinct, and different parts of the brain may have counteracting responses to therapy. To better match our therapies to neuroscience, we develop techniques that allow intervention upon only the right part of the nervous system at the right time, using technologies like focused ultrasound and nanotechnology.

  • Patrick Barnes

    Patrick Barnes

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Advanced imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, of injury to the developing central nervous system; including fetal, neonatal, infant and young child; and, including nonaccidental injury (e.g. child abuse).

  • Richard Barth

    Richard Barth

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Sonographic diagnosis of fetal anomalies.
    Focus interest in the diagnosis and conservative (non-surgical and minimal radiation) management of congenital broncho pulmonary malformations.
    Imaging of appendicitis in children.
    Sonography of the pediatric testis.

  • Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Radiology (Musculoskeletal Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Informatics and image processing techniques that provide infrastructure for diagnosis in musculoskeletal imaging. Decision support for improving accuracy of bone tumor diagnosis. Improved methods for MRI in the musculoskeletal system.

  • Hans-Christoph Becker, MD, FSABI, FSCCT

    Hans-Christoph Becker, MD, FSABI, FSCCT

    Clinical Professor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Myocardial bridges (MB) with associated upfront atherosclerotic lesions are common findings on coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). Abnormal septal wall motion in exercise echocardiography (EE) may to be associated with MB. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is considered the gold standard for the detection of MB. We investigate whether CTA is comparable to IVUS for the assessment of MB and upstream plaques in symptomatic patients with suspicion for MB raised by EE.

  • Corinne Beinat

    Corinne Beinat

    Instructor, Radiology - Rad/Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My current research areas of interest include developing new strategies for: 1) novel radioligand and radiotracer development for various targets involved in brain cancer, 2) preclinical animal models of glioblastoma, and 3) clinical translation of useful radiopharmaceuticals for early-detection of disease and monitoring therapy.

  • Sandip Biswal, MD

    Sandip Biswal, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Musculoskeletal Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The management of individuals suffering from chronic pain is unfortunately limited by poor diagnostic tests and therapies. Our research group is interested in 'imaging pain' by using novel imaging techniques to study peripheral nociception and inflammation with the goal of accurately identifying the location of pain generators. We are developing new approaches with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (PET/MRI) and are currently in clinical trials.

  • Francis Blankenberg

    Francis Blankenberg

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies on apoptotic cell death in vivo using the H MRS phenomenon.

  • Akshay Chaudhari

    Akshay Chaudhari

    Instructor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Chaudhari's current research interests include developing and characterizing deep learning methodologies to augment the magnetic resonance imaging workflow. He focuses on new ultra-fast imaging methods that provide rapid and quantitative assessment of anatomy which can be used for clinical purposes as well as in research studies. He is also interested in multi-modal acquisition and analysis methods for better understanding the early degenerative processes of osteoarthritis.

  • Zhen Cheng

    Zhen Cheng

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests To develop novel molecular imaging probes and techniques for non-invasively early detection of cancer using multimodality imaging technologies including PET, SPECT, MRI, optical imaging, etc.

  • Frederick T. Chin, Ph.D.

    Frederick T. Chin, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group's primary objectives are:

    1) Novel radioligand and radiotracer development.
    We will develop novel PET (Positron Emission Tomography) imaging agents with MIPS and Stanford faculty as well as other outside collaborations including academia and pharmaceutical industry. Although my personal research interests will be to discover and design of candidate probes that target molecular targets in the brain, our group focus will primarily be on cancer biology and gene therapy. In conjunction with our state-of-the-art imaging facility, promising candidates will be evaluated by PET-CT/MR imaging in small animals and primates. Successful radioligands and/or radiotracers will be extended towards future human clinical applications.

    2) Designing new radiolabeling techniques and methodologies.
    We will aim to design new radiolabeling techniques and methodologies that may have utility for future radiopharmaceutical development in our lab and the general radiochemistry community.

    3) Radiochemistry production of routine clinical tracers.
    Since we also have many interests with many Stanford faculty and outside collaborators, our efforts will also include the routine radiochemistry production of many existing radiotracers for human and non-human use. Our routine clinical tracers will be synthesized in custom-made or commercial synthetic modules (i.e. GE TRACERlab modules) housed in lead-shielded cells and be distributed manually or automatically (i.e. Comecer Dorothea) to our imagers.

  • Sean Gregory Creeden

    Sean Gregory Creeden

    Clinical Instructor, Radiology

    Bio Undergraduate: Colorado State University
    Medical School: Creighton University School of Medicine
    Internship: Trident Family Health/Medical University of South Carolina
    Residency: Medical University of South Carolina

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Ultrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Heike Daldrup-Link

    Heike Daldrup-Link

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As a physician-scientist involved in the care of pediatric patients and developing novel pediatric molecular imaging technologies, my goal is to link the fields of nanotechnology and medical imaging towards more efficient diagnoses and image-guided therapies. Our research team develops novel imaging techniques for improved cancer diagnosis, for image-guided-drug delivery and for in vivo monitoring of cell therapies in children and young adults.

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-compatible remote manipulation and haptics

    3. Medical Mixed Reality. Currently being explored are methods of fusing patients and their images to potentially improve breast conserving surgery, and other conditions.

  • Guido Davidzon

    Guido Davidzon

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology - Rad/Nuclear Medicine

    Bio Dr. Guido A. Davidzon is a physician-scientist board certified in Nuclear Medicine. He is an attending physician in Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging at Stanford Health Care.

    He graduated with honors from medical school in Argentina and completed an internship at Yale University New-Haven Hospital in Connecticut. He did his residency and was chief resident at Stanford Health Care. He completed a research fellowship in mitochondrial diseases at Columbia University in New York and, a U.S. National Library of Medicine Award supported, Biomedical Informatics fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital in conjunction with a Science Masters at MIT.

    Dr. Davidzon is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University. His clinical specialties include early diagnostic imaging of cancer, coronary artery disease, and dementias using molecular probes as well as the treatment of cancer for which he employs targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy.

    Dr. Davidzon investigates the use of machine learning in medical imaging to improve clinical outcomes, he is involved in the professional Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. He serves as a peer reviewer for multiple medical journals. Dr. Davidzon is a native of Buenos Aires, Argentina and has lived in the U.S. for over a decade. He travels to Argentina frequently, with his wife and three sons.

  • Wendy DeMartini

    Wendy DeMartini

    Professor of Radiology (Breast Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Wendy DeMartini is a Professor and the Chief of the Breast Imaging Division in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. DeMartini completed her fellowship in Breast Imaging at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington. She then served as Breast Imaging faculty at the University of Washington where she became Associate Professor and Associate Director of Clinical Services, and at the University of Wisconsin where she became Professor and Chief of Breast Imaging. Her work is focused upon high quality patient care, clinical research and education.

    Dr. DeMartini has more than 100 research presentations, abstracts/publications, review articles or book chapters. Her research is directed toward the appropriate evidence-based use of imaging tests to optimize the detection and evaluation of breast cancer. She has served as an investigator on several studies of breast MRI funded by the National Cancer Institute and by the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN). Particular research topics have included the development of a pilot tool for predicting the probability of malignancy of breast MRI lesions, assessment of the impact of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on breast MRI accuracy, and evaluation of current utilization patterns of breast MRI and other emerging technologies.

    Dr. DeMartini is a highly sought-after educator. She lectures on a broad spectrum of breast imaging topics nationally and internationally, including in the Americas, Europe, Australasia and Africa. She is also the Co-Director of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Education Center Breast MRI with Biopsy Course. Dr. DeMartini is an active member of many professional organizations and committees, including in the Radiologic Society of North America, the American College of Radiology and the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI). She was elected as an SBI Fellow in 2009, and served as President of the SBI in 2017-2018.

  • Utkan Demirci

    Utkan Demirci

    Professor of Radiology (Canary Cancer Center)

    Bio Dr. Demirci is currently a Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine with tenure at the Canary Center for Early Cancer Detection. Prior to his Stanford appointment, he was an Associate Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and at Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology serving at the Division of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Infectious Diseases and Renal Division. He leads a group of 20+ researchers focusing on micro- and nano-scale technologies. He received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1999 as a James B. Angell Scholar (summa cum laude) from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He received his M.S. degree in 2001 in Electrical Engineering, M.S. degree in Management Science and Engineering in 2005, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2005, all from Stanford University.

    The Demirci Bio-Acoustic MEMS in Medicine Lab (BAMM) specializes in applying micro- and nanoscale technologies to problems in medicine at the interface between micro/nanoscale engineering and medicine. Our goal is to apply innovative technologies to clinical problems. Our major research theme focuses on creating new microfluidic technology platforms targeting broad applications in medicine. In this interdisciplinary space at the convergence of engineering, biology and materials science, we create novel technologies for disposable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and monitoring of infectious diseases, cancer and controlling cellular microenvironment in nanoliter droplets for biopreservation and microscale tissue engineering applications. These applications are unified around our expertise to test the limits of cell manipulation by establishing microfluidic platforms to provide solutions to real world problems at the clinic.

    Our lab creates technologies to manipulate cells in nanoliter volumes to enable solutions for real world problems in medicine including applications in infectious disease diagnostics and monitoring for global health, cancer early detection, cell encapsulation in nanoliter droplets for cryobiology, and bottom-up tissue engineering. Dr. Demirci has published over 120 peer reviewed publications in journals including PNAS, Nature Communications, Advanced Materials, Small, Trends in Biotechnology, Chemical Society Reviews and Lab-chip, over 150 conference abstracts and proceedings, 10+ book chapters, and an edited book. His work was highlighted in Wired Magazine, Nature Photonics, Nature Medicine, MIT Technology Review, Reuters Health News, Science Daily, AIP News, BioTechniques, and Biophotonics. He is fellow-elect of the American Institute of Biological and Medical Engineering (AIMBE, 2017). His scientific work has been recognized by numerous national and international awards including the NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award (2012), the IEEE-EMBS Early Career Achievement Award (2012), Scientist of the year award from Stanford radiology Department (2017). He was selected as one of the world?s top 35 young innovators under the age of 35 (TR-35) by the MIT Technology Review at the age of 28. In 2004, he led a team that won the Stanford University Entrepreneur?s Challenge Competition and Global Start-up Competition in Singapore. His work has been translated to start-up companies including DxNow, KOEK Biotechnology and LEVITAS. There has been over 10,000 live births in the US, Europe and Turkey using the sperm selection technology that came out of Dr. Demirci's lab. He has been cited over 3000 times within the last two years (H index, 60).

  • Terry Desser

    Terry Desser

    Professor of Radiology (Abdominal Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Imaging of gastrointestinal tract cancer
    Ultrasound
    Simulated learning environment

  • Jennifer Dionne

    Jennifer Dionne

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Bio Jennifer Dionne is an associate professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Radiology (by courtesy) at Stanford. Jen received her Ph. D. in Applied Physics at the California Institute of Technology, advised by Harry Atwater, and B.S. degrees in Physics and Systems & Electrical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining Stanford, she served as a postdoctoral researcher in Chemistry at Berkeley, advised by Paul Alivisatos. Jen?s research develops new approaches to image chemical and biological processes as they unfold with nanometer scale resolution. She then uses these observations to help improve energy-relevant processes (such as photocatalysis and energy storage) and medical diagnostics and therapeutics. Her work has been recognized with the Alan T. Waterman Award (2019), a Moore Inventor Fellowship (2017), the Materials Research Society Young Investigator Award (2017), Adolph Lomb Medal (2016), Sloan Foundation Fellowship (2015), and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2014), and was recently featured on Oprah?s list of ?50 Things that will make you say ?Wow?!?.

  • Robert Dodd, MD, PhD

    Robert Dodd, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery, of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Dodd is involved in clinical trials using endovascular coils that have a fiber coating that help heal aneurysms of the neck and can prevent an aneurysm from reforming. He uses minimally invasive endoscopic techniques to treat brain tumors.

    Dodd's research interests are in cerebral blood vessel reactivity and stroke.

  • Lane Donnelly

    Lane Donnelly

    Professor of Radiology and of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Bio Lane F. Donnelly MD is currently Chief Quality Officer and Christopher G. Dawes Endowed Director of Quality at Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital and Stanford Children?s Health. He is also a Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics and the Associate Dean, Maternal and Child Health (Quality and Safety) in the School of Medicine at Stanford University. He also serves as the Co-Executive Director of Stanford Medicine Center for Improvement.

    Dr. Donnelly has been an NIH funded researcher, has published 278 peer review manuscripts that have been cited over 10,000 times and has authored multiple textbooks, including Pediatric Imaging: The Fundamentals, a lead selling text book on pediatric imaging. Many improvement projects for which he was a contributor have received multiple national recognitions including International Quality Radiology Network?s Quality-Improvement in Radiology Practices Paper Competition: Annual Award 2008 (Paper of the Year); Caffey Award ? for Outstanding Presented Paper, Society for Pediatric Radiology (2001, 2009, 2011); 2012 British Medical Association Book Awards; Singleton?Taybi Award for Lifetime Achievements in Education, Society for Pediatric Radiology (2009); Journal of the America College of Radiology 2018 Paper of the Year Award; and the 2009 Best Scientific Paper Award - Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and the RSNA Honored Educator Award (2019). Dr. Donnelly has served on the Board of Trustees for both the American Board of Radiology and the Society for Pediatric Radiology.

    Former Leadership positions include Radiologist-in-Chief and Frederic N. Silverman Chair of Pediatric Radiology as well as Executive Cabinet member at Cincinnati Children?s Hospital Medical Center (2002-2011); Inaugural Chief Medical Officer / Physician-in-Chief at the Nemours Children?s Hospital (helping plan, staff, and open the greenfield hospital in 2012) and Enterprise Vice President as well as Enterprise Radiologist-in-Chief for the Nemours Foundation (2011-2015); and Chief Quality Officer for Hospital Based Services at Texas Children?s Hospital (2015-2017). He was educated at The Ohio State University and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

  • Gozde Durmus

    Gozde Durmus

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Durmus' research focuses on applying micro/nano-technologies to investigate cellular heterogeneity for single-cell analysis and personalized medicine. At Stanford, she is developing platform technologies for sorting and monitoring cells at the single-cell resolution. This magnetic levitation-based technology is used for wide range of applications in medicine, such as, label-free detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood; high-throughput drug screening; and rapid detection and monitoring of antibiotic resistance in real-time. During her PhD, she has engineered nanoparticles and nanostructured surfaces to decrease antibiotic-resistant infections.

  • Ahmed Nagy El Kaffas

    Ahmed Nagy El Kaffas

    Instructor, Radiology

    Bio We develop quantitative imaging methods to characterize the tumor microenvironment, and to subsequently relate these imaging parameters to biomarkers that can be used for cancer surveillance, diagnosis and treatment monitoring/characterization. The focus is on 1) developing new acquisition methods and protocols to enhance quantification, 2) designing new image processing algorithms, analysis parameters and statistical models to quantitatively characterize imaging data, and 3) using advanced AI methods to further refine quantification or classification. While our methods can be used for other imaging modalities, we primarily focus on Ultrasound imaging modes such as contrast, molecular, elastography and spectroscopic ultrasound. Disease focus include liver cancer and liver metastasis, liver fibrosis/cirrhosis, and tumor blood flow characterization.

  • Daniel Bruce Ennis

    Daniel Bruce Ennis

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Veterans Affairs)

    Bio Daniel Ennis (Ph.D.) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Radiology. As an MRI scientist for nearly twenty years, he has worked to develop advanced translational cardiovascular MRI methods for quantitatively assessing structure, function, flow, and remodeling in both adult and pediatric populations. He began his research career as a Ph.D. student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University during which time he formed an active collaboration with investigators in the Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI). Thereafter, he joined the Departments of Radiological Sciences and Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University as a post doc and began to establish an independent research program with an NIH K99/R00 award focused on ?Myocardial Structure, Function, and Remodeling in Mitral Regurgitation.? For ten years he led a group of clinicians and scientists at UCLA working to develop and evaluate advanced cardiovascular MRI exams as PI of several NIH funded studies. In 2018 he returned to Stanford Radiology and the Radiological Sciences Lab to bolster programs in cardiovascular MRI. He is also the Director of Radiology Research for the Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System where he oversees a growing radiology research program.

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