School of Medicine


Showing 21-28 of 28 Results

  • Monte Winslow

    Monte Winslow

    Associate Professor of Genetics and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory uses genome-wide methods to uncover alterations that drive cancer progression and metastasis in genetically-engineered mouse models of human cancers. We combine cell-culture based mechanistic studies with our ability to alter pathways of interest during tumor progression in vivo to better understand each step of metastatic spread and to uncover the therapeutic vulnerabilities of advanced cancer cells.

  • Max Wintermark

    Max Wintermark

    Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention) and, by courtesy, of Neurology, of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Stroke, cerebrovascular diseases, cardiovascular diseases, carotid arteries, coronary arteries
    Stroke diagnosis, stroke triage, stroke treatment
    Traumatic brain injury
    Traumatic brain injury diagnosis and prognosis
    Psychiatric disorders, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorders
    Epilepsy
    Movement disorders, including essential tremor and Parkinson?s tremor
    Brain tumors
    Image-guided clinical trials
    CT, multidetector-row CT, perfusion-CT, CT angiography
    MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, perfusion-weighted MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI
    Brain perfusion imaging techniques
    Functional imaging
    Post-processing techniques of medical images, signal and image processing
    3D visualization
    MR-guided focused ultrasound

  • Albert J. Wong, M.D.

    Albert J. Wong, M.D.

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our goal is to define targets for cancer therapeutics by identifying alterations in signal transduction proteins. We first identified a naturally occurring mutant EGF receptor (EGFRvIII) and then delineated its unique signal transduction pathway. This work led to the identification of Gab1 followed by the discovery that JNK is constitutively active in tumors. We intiated using altered proteins as the target for vaccination, where an EGFRvIII based vaccine appears to be highly effective.

  • Wing Hung Wong

    Wing Hung Wong

    Stephen R. Pierce Family Goldman Sachs Professor in Science and Human Health and Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current interest centers on the application of statistics to biology and medicine. We are particularly interested in questions concerning gene regulation, genome interpretation and their applications to precision medicine.

  • Albert Wu

    Albert Wu

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My translational research focuses on using autologous stem cells to recreate a patient?s ocular tissues for potential transplantation. We are generating tissue from induced pluripotent stem cells to treat limbal stem cell deficiency in patients who are bilaterally blind. By applying my background in molecular and cellular biology, stem cell biology, oculoplastic surgery, I hope to make regenerative medicine a reality for those suffering from orbital and ocular disease.

  • Joseph  C. Wu

    Joseph C. Wu

    Director, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Simon H. Stertzer, MD, Professor and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Drug discovery, drug screening, and disease modeling using biobank of cardiac iPSC lines.

  • Joy Wu

    Joy Wu

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory focuses on the pathways that regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast and adipocyte lineages. We are also studying the role of osteoblasts in the hematopoietic and cancer niches in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  • Joanna Wysocka

    Joanna Wysocka

    Lorry Lokey Professor and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The precise and robust regulation of gene expression is a cornerstone for complex biological life. Research in our laboratory is focused on understanding how regulatory information encoded by the genome is integrated with the transcriptional machinery and chromatin context to allow for emergence of form and function during human embryogenesis and evolution, and how perturbations in this process lead to disease.

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