School of Medicine


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  • Tom Wandless

    Tom Wandless

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We employ an interdisciplinary approach to studies of biological systems, combining synthetic chemistry with biochemistry, cell biology, and structural biology. We invent tools for biology and we are motivated by approaches that enable new experiments with unprecedented control. These new techniques may also provide a window into mechanisms involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Protein quality control is a particular interest at present.

  • William Weis

    William Weis

    William M. Hume Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Structural Biology, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and of Photon Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory studies molecular interactions that underlie the establishment and maintenance of cell and tissue structure. Our specific areas of interest are the architecture and dynamics of intercellular adhesion junctions, the molecular basis of cell polarity, and the Wnt signaling pathway. We also have a long-standing interest in carbohydrate-based cellular recognition and adhesion.

  • Monte Winslow

    Monte Winslow

    Associate Professor of Genetics and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory uses genome-wide methods to uncover alterations that drive cancer progression and metastasis in genetically-engineered mouse models of human cancers. We combine cell-culture based mechanistic studies with our ability to alter pathways of interest during tumor progression in vivo to better understand each step of metastatic spread and to uncover the therapeutic vulnerabilities of advanced cancer cells.

  • Albert J. Wong, M.D.

    Albert J. Wong, M.D.

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our goal is to define targets for cancer therapeutics by identifying alterations in signal transduction proteins. We first identified a naturally occurring mutant EGF receptor (EGFRvIII) and then delineated its unique signal transduction pathway. This work led to the identification of Gab1 followed by the discovery that JNK is constitutively active in tumors. We intiated using altered proteins as the target for vaccination, where an EGFRvIII based vaccine appears to be highly effective.

  • Joanna Wysocka

    Joanna Wysocka

    Lorry Lokey Professor and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The precise and robust regulation of gene expression is a cornerstone for complex biological life. Research in our laboratory is focused on understanding how regulatory information encoded by the genome is integrated with the transcriptional machinery and chromatin context to allow for emergence of form and function during human embryogenesis and evolution, and how perturbations in this process lead to disease.

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