School of Medicine


Showing 21-30 of 413 Results

  • David Camacho Talavera

    David Camacho Talavera

    Clinical Instructor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Bio Dr. David Talavera earned his doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of Houston where he worked in the Culture, Risk, and Reliance Lab. His research focused on examining the impact of race/ethnicity and acculturation in health outcomes and anxiety. His broader interests included developing culturally sensitive interventions for those suffering from chronic illness and pain. Dr. Talavera completed an APA-accredited Psychology Internship at the Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical school. He primarily worked at the Latino Mental Health Clinic, but also had rotations in Primary Care, the Acute Psychological Services, and the Psychology Emergency Services. It was at these sites where he gained added training in behavioral medicine, culturally competent care, and Spanish-language mental health services. Collectively, for Dr. Talavera, these experiences highlighted the critical role of race, ethnicity, and culture have on an individual?s experience of stress and health. As a result, he aims to incorporate these multicultural factors into his treatment and evaluation.

    After internship, in 2019 he completed an APA-accredited Fellowship in Pain Psychology at Stanford University School of Medicine in the Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Pain. Dr. Talavera is currently a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Anesthesia and works in the Stanford Pain Management Center. Dr. Talavera's professional interests include expanding pain psychology treatment modalities for underrepresented groups and Spanish-speaking populations. He aims to expand these services within the Stanford Health Care system and continue to teach/supervise on multicultural factors within pain psychology.

  • William Talbot

    William Talbot

    Senior Associate Dean, Graduate Education & Postdoctoral Affairs and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use genetic and cellular approaches to investigate the molecular basis of glial development and myelination in the zebrafish.

  • Suzanne Tamang

    Suzanne Tamang

    Instructor, Biomedical Data Science

    Bio Suzanne Tamang is based at the Center for Population Health Sciences She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the City University of New York and completed her postdoctoral training at the Stanford's Center for Biomedical Bioinformatics.

    At Stanford, Suzanne's collaborations span the Alcoa Research Consortium, the Clinical Excellence Research Center and the Stanford Cancer Institute. She is also affiliated with the Department of Rheumatology at UCSF.

  • John S. Tamaresis, PhD, MS

    John S. Tamaresis, PhD, MS

    Biostatistician, Biomedical Data Science

    Bio Dr. Tamaresis joined the Stanford University School of Medicine in Summer 2012. He earned the Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from the University of California, Davis and received the M.S. in Statistics from the California State University, East Bay. He has conducted research in computational biology as a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Merced and as a biostatistician at the University of California, San Francisco.

    As a statistician, Dr. Tamaresis has developed and validated a highly accurate statistical biomarker classifier for gynecologic disease by applying multivariate techniques to a large genomic data set. His statistical consultations have produced data analyses for published research studies and analysis plans for novel research proposals in grant applications. As an applied mathematician, Dr. Tamaresis has created computational biology models and devised numerical methods for their solution. He devised a probabilistic model to study how the number of binding sites on a novel therapeutic molecule affected contact time with cancer cells to advise medical researchers about its design. For his doctoral dissertation, he created and analyzed the first mathematical system model for a mechanosensory network in vascular endothelial cells to investigate the initial stage of atherosclerotic disease.

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