School of Medicine


Showing 51-57 of 57 Results

  • Ruping Sun

    Ruping Sun

    Affiliate, Stanford Cancer Institute

    Bio High resolution and fidelity in measuring (epi)genetic variation is the foundation of precision cancer genomics. As a geneticist and computational biologist, my research is focused on bioinformatic innovations to improve the detection and quantification of intra tumor heterogeneity (ITH) from next generation sequencing (NGS) data, and leverage patterns of ITH to infer the evolutionary dynamics of human cancers.

    During my research tenure, I have developed considerable expertise in algorithm design and statistical analysis of (epi)genetic data, as well as in the computational modelling of cancer, such as gene regulatory circuits and cellular automata models. My unique experiences and quantitative training have enabled me to conduct impactful research at the interface of cancer genomics, computational and systems biology. My goal is to continue to develop algorithms and computational methods that advance a mechanistic understanding of tumor evolution and that are accessible and broadly utilized by the cancer biology community.

  • ZijieáSun

    ZijieáSun

    Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We focus on understanding the molecular mechanism of transcription factors that govern the transformation of normal cells to a neoplastic state. We are especially interested in nuclear hormone action and its interactions with other signaling pathways in tumor development and progression.

  • John B. Sunwoo

    John B. Sunwoo

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory is focused on two primary areas of research: (1) the immune response to head and neck cancer and to a tumorigenic population of cells within these malignancies called cancer stem cells; (2) the developmental programs of a special lymphocyte population involved in innate immunity called natural killer (NK) cells; and (3) intra-tumor and inter-tumor heterogeneity.

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Bio Using and Understanding Cell-Free Biology

    Swartz Lab General Research Focus:

    The current and projected research in the Swartz lab balances basic research in microbial metabolism, protein expression, and protein folding with a strong emphasis on compelling applications. The power and versatility of cell-free methods coupled with careful evaluation and engineering of these new systems enables a whole new range of applications and scientific investigation. Fundamental research on: the mechanisms and kinetics of ribosomal function, fundamental bioenergetics, basic mechanisms of protein folding, functional genomics, and metabolic pathway analysis is motivated by a variety of near- and medium term applications spanning medicine, energy, and environmental needs.

    Swartz Lab Application Focus:

    In the medical area , current research addresses the need for patient-specific vaccines to treat cancer. Particularly for lymphomas, there is a strong need to be able to make a new cancer vaccine for each patient. Current technologies are not practical for this demanding task, but cell-free approaches are rapid and inexpensive. We have already demonstrated feasibility in mouse tumor challenge studies and are now expanding the range of applications and working to improve the relevant technologies. Experience with these vaccines has also suggested a new and exciting format for making inexpensive and very potent vaccines for general use.

    To address pressing needs for a new and cleaner energy source, we are working towards an organism that can efficiently capture solar energy and convert it into hydrogen. The first task is to develop an oxygen tolerant hydrogenase using cell-free technology to express libraries of mutated enzymes that can be rapidly screened for improved function. Even though these are very complex enzymes, we have produced active hydrogenases with our cell-free methods. We are now perfecting the screening methods for rapid and accurate identification of improved enzymes. After these new enzymes are identified, the project will progress toward metabolic engineering and bioreactor design research to achieve the scales and economies required.

    To address environmental needs, we are developing an improved water filters using an amazing membrane protein, Aquaporin Z. It has the ability to reject all other chemicals and ions except water. We have efficiently expressed the protein into lipid bilayer vesicles and are now working to cast these membranes on porous supports to complete the development of a new and powerful water purification technology. The same lessons will be applied toward the development of a new class of biosensors that brings high sensitivity and selectivity.

  • Susan M. Swetter, MD

    Susan M. Swetter, MD

    Professor of Dermatology at Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System and the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1) Early detection of melanoma through enhanced screening, novel technologies, and professional/public education to improve melanoma awareness. 2) Therapeutic prevention of melanoma and other skin cancers in high-risk groups. 4) Epidemiologic and sociodemographic melanoma risk factors. 4) National dermatologist liaison to ECOG-ACRIN Melanoma Committee and Co-founder/Co-Director of the Melanoma Prevention Working Group, an interdisciplinary Intergroup collaboration dedicated to melanoma control.

  • Karl Sylvester

    Karl Sylvester

    Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One of the current primary interests of the lab is to investigate the mechanisms by which hepatocellular injury and recovery is influenced and controlled by hepatocyte metabolism.

    A second focus of investigation is to identify molecular markers of human disease that provide diagnostic function, serve as targets for possible therapeutic manipulation, or provide insight into mechanisms of human disease. Specific diseases of interest include newborn sepsis and Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC).

  • DanieláSze, MD, PhD

    DanieláSze, MD, PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Interventional Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transarterial administration of chemotherapeutics, radioactive microspheres, and biologics for the treatment of unresectable tumors; management of portal hypertension and complications of cirrhosis (TIPS); treatment of complications of organ transplantation; Venous and pulmonary arterial thrombolysis and reconstruction; Stent and Stent-graft treatment of peripheral vascular diseases, aneurysms, aortic dissections

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