School of Medicine


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  • Malaya Kumar Sahoo

    Malaya Kumar Sahoo

    Basic Life Res Scientist, Pathology Sponsored Projects

    Current Role at Stanford Basic Life Science Research Scientist
    Lab manager

  • Atif Saleem

    Atif Saleem

    Resident in Pathology

    Bio Dr. Atif Saleem is a fourth-year resident in anatomic and clinical pathology with interests in global health, dermatopathology, and hematopathology.

  • Darren Salmi

    Darren Salmi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Anatomy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Medical education, anatomy, autopsy, cardiovascular pathology

  • Ansuman Satpathy

    Ansuman Satpathy

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab works at the interface of immunology, cancer biology, and genomics to study cellular and molecular mechanisms of the immune response to cancer. In particular, we are leveraging high-throughput genomic technologies to understand the dynamics of the tumor-specific T cell response to cancer antigens and immunotherapies (checkpoint blockade, CAR-T cells, and others). We are also interested in understanding the impact of immuno-editing on the heterogeneity and clonal evolution of cancer.

    We previously developed genome sequencing technologies that enable epigenetic studies in primary human immune cells from patients: 1) 3D enhancer-promoter interaction profiling (Nat Genet, 2017), 2) paired epigenome and T cell receptor (TCR) profiling in single cells (Nat Med, 2018), 3) paired epigenome and CRISPR profiling in single cells (Cell, 2019), and high-throughput single-cell ATAC-seq in droplets (Nature Biotech, 2019). We used these tools to study fundamental principles of the T cell response to cancer immunotherapy (PD-1 blockade) directly in cancer patient samples (Nature Biotech, 2019; Nat Med, 2019).

  • Birgitt Schuele

    Birgitt Schuele

    Associate Professor (Research) of Pathology

    Bio Birgitt Schüle, MD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on medical genetics and stem cell modeling to unlock disease mechanisms and pathways leading to neurodegeneration in Parkinson?s disease and related disorders, and to develop new therapeutic strategies to advance precision medicine.
    She received her medical training from the Georg-August University Göttingen and Medical University Lübeck, Germany (1993 - 2001) and completed doctoral degree in medicine (Dr. med.) in neurophysiology at the Georg-August University Göttingen (2001). During her neurology internship from 2001 to 2002 at Medical University of Lübeck with Prof. Christine Klein, Dr. Schüle studied genes for inherited forms of Parkinson?s disease and dystonia. From 2003 to 2005, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in human genetics with Prof. Uta Francke at Stanford University School of Medicine. From 2005-2019, Dr. Schüle led key clinical research programs and biospecimen repositories for neurogenetics, translational stem cell and brain donation at the Parkinson?s Institute and Clinical Center.

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