School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 14 Results

  • Vittorio Sebastiano

    Vittorio Sebastiano

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The thread of Ariadne that connects germ cells, preimplatation development and pluripotent stem cells is the focus of my research, with a specific interest in human development. My long-term goals are: 1. Understanding the biology of germ cells and and their ability to sustain early preimplantation development; 2. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate very early cell fate decisions in human embryos; 3. Understanding the biology of derivation and maintenance of Pluripotent Stem Cells

  • Gary M. Shaw

    Gary M. Shaw

    NICU Nurses Professor and Professor (Research), by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests include 1) epidemiology of birth defects, 2) gene-environment approaches to perinatal outcomes, and 3) nutrition and reproductive outcomes.

  • Kate Shaw

    Kate Shaw

    Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include expanding access to and and improving patient experience with contraception and abortion care both domestically and globally. I am also interested in medical education and resilience among physicians and trainees.

  • Eric R. Sokol, MD

    Eric R. Sokol, MD

    Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Gynecology-Urogynecology) and, by courtesy, of Urology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research is focused on the development and testing of novel minimally invasive treatment modalities for complex pelvic floor disorders.

  • Michelle Solone

    Michelle Solone

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - General

    Bio Dr. Solone was born at Stanford Hospital and grew up in northern California. She went to UC Davis for college where she studied Exercise Science and was the captain of the cross country and track and field teams. She worked as a personal trainer and teacher before starting medical school at UC Irvine. She then returned to the Bay Area to attend Stanford for her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology. In her final year of residency she was an Administrative Chief resident. As a Clinical Instructor and Assistant Residency Program Director in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology she enjoys teaching residents, working on Labor and Delivery, performing gynecologic surgery, and seeing a variety of patients at the Gynecology and Obstetrics clinics. She also sees patients at the Palo Alto Veteran's Affairs Gynecology clinic one day per week. Dr. Solone is proud to work at the exceptional institution where she completed her residency training and where her children were delivered.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Marcia Stefanick, Ph.D a Professor of Medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, (SPRC) and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Dr. Stefanicks research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. Her work on the effects of menopausal hormones on cardiovascular and other health outcomes in mostly healthy postmenopausal women (in the Womens Health Initiative, WHI), in women with established heart disease, (the Heart and Estrogen-progesterone Replacement Study, HERS), and in peri-menopausal and early post-menopausal women (the Postmenopausal Estrogen and Progesterone Interventions, PEPI) trials has been widely disseminated both nationally and internationally. She was also the principal investigator of two large diet trials focusing on the role of a low-fat eating pattern (including increased vegetables & fruits) on preventing breast cancer (WHI) and recurrence (Womens Healthy Eating and Living, WHEL, trial) and she conducted several medium-sized diet, exercise, and weight control trials focused on heart disease risk and body composition that have influenced national guidelines. [She is currently writing a proposal for a large national trial of physical activity in older women with cardiovascular outcomes, not just risk factors.] Her current passion is the study of Sex (and Gender) Differences in Human Physiology and Disease, the title of a course she teaches in Stanfords Human Biology program, in addition to a course entitled: Current Topics and Controversies in Womens Health. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles in Stanfords Cardiovascular Institutes Womens Heart Health Program and Stanford Cancer Institutes Cancer Prevention and Control Program.
    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research directed her to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at SPRC, which has been her academic home for nearly 30 years.

  • Harise Stein

    Harise Stein

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology

    Bio Dr. Harise Stein has multiple clinical, teaching and administrative roles at Stanford in addition to her private practice in Mountain View.

    -- Stanford Physician PRN Support Director (wellmd.stanford.edu/get-help/prn-support.html), having served as an initial member of the peer support program, a peer support trainer, and author of the peer support manual. In addition, for 8 years, up until January 2019, she served as the WellMD Newsletter editor, and was the creator and webmaster for the WellMD website (wellmd.stanford.edu). She is a frequent speaker on topics of burnout and resilience for medical and community groups.

    -- Founder and Co-Chair of Stanford Family Abuse Prevention Council, teaching medical and community members about the health effects, recognition and management of partner and family abuse. She has created Stanford websites for domestic abuse (domesticabuse.stanford.edu), child abuse, elder abuse and human trafficking, as well as a monthly abuse research summary (abuseresearch.info) that goes out to a large national and international audience of clinicians, researchers, advocates and policy makers. In addition, she served for seven years as a Commissioner for on the Santa Clara County Domestic Violence Council and has been a member of the LPCH Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect Committee since its formation.

    -- Director of Stanford Ob/Gyn Preoperative Mind-Body Support program, preparing patients in ob and gyn clinics for upcoming surgery using various techniques including education, mindfulness, relaxation and positive psychology. She is a founding member of the Stanford Integrative Medicine Society and webmaster for the website integrativemedicine.stanford.edu.

    Through her many years of caring for patients and fellow physicians, she has come to believe that the most important root factor in health and well-being is the power of relationships - how family members treat each other, the impact of an optimal patient-physician interaction, and the support of medical colleagues by and for each other and their relationship with their institution.

  • David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    The Harold K. Faber Professor of Pediatrics, Senior Associate Dean, Maternal and Child Health and Professor, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is focused on the study of the ontogeny and control of heme catabolism and bilirubin production in the developing neonate. A better understanding of the role of increased bilirubin production in neonatal jaundice and the prevention of hemolytic jaundice has remained an overall objective of our program. Thus, we are exploring the pivotal role of the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of bilirubin in the developing neonate.

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: