School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 16 Results

  • Kristin Sainani (n e Cobb)

    Kristin Sainani (n e Cobb)

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Science writing, science communication, biostatistics. Research areas: osteoporosis, stress fractures, sports injuries, female athlete triad.

  • Joshua Salomon

    Joshua Salomon

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Outcomes Research), Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research)

    Bio Joshua Salomon is a Professor of Medicine and a core faculty member in the Center for Health Policy and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research. His research focuses on priority-setting in global health, within three main substantive areas: (1) measurement and valuation of health outcomes; (2) modeling patterns and trends in major causes of global mortality and disease burden; and (3) evaluation of health interventions and policies.

    Dr. Salomon is an investigator on projects funded by the Centers for Disease Control, National Institutes of Health and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, relating to modeling of infectious and chronic diseases and associated intervention strategies; methods for economic evaluation of public health programs; measurement of the global burden of disease; and assessment of the potential impact and cost effectiveness of new health technologies.

    He is Director of the Prevention Policy Modeling Lab, which is a multi-institution research consortium that conducts health and economic modeling relating to infectious disease. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Dr. Salomon was Professor of Global Health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

  • Lee Sanders

    Lee Sanders

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I conduct interdisciplinary research to understand child and parent health literacy as potentially modifiable determinants of child health disparities. I am principal investigator on an multi-site, randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a low-literacy, early-childhood intervention designed to prevent obesity in the first two years of life. The aim of my current scholarship is to apply the health-literacy model to attenuate disparities for children with chronic illness.

  • Stylianos Serghiou

    Stylianos Serghiou

    Ph.D. Student in Epidemiology and Clinical Research, admitted Autumn 2016

    Bio Stylianos (Stelios) Serghiou joined the PhD program in Epidemiology and Clinical Research in 2016. After spending two years as a second lieutenant for the National Guard of Cyprus, he attended the University of Edinburgh, where he obtained a BSc with Honors in Neuroscience in 2012 and received his medical degree (MBChB) with Honors in 2015. He was then awarded a post and worked for a year as an Academic Foundation Doctor for NHS Lothian and as an Honorary Clinical Fellow of the University of Edinburgh. Over his time in Edinburgh, he obtained multiple awards, including scholarships by the Royal College of Physicians of UK and Ireland, Royal College of Ophthalmologists and being an AMGEN scholar. He is moving to Stanford to work on his interests in improving the quality of medical research and exploring the application of novel computational techniques to analyzing big data in medicine. Alongside medicine, he is especially interested in music and had served as the leader of the National Youth Orchestra of Cyprus and a first violin of the University of Edinburgh Symphony Orchestra.

  • Gary M. Shaw

    Gary M. Shaw

    NICU Nurses Professor and Professor (Research), by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests include 1) epidemiology of birth defects, 2) gene-environment approaches to perinatal outcomes, and 3) nutrition and reproductive outcomes.

  • Julia Simard

    Julia Simard

    Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    Bio Julia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy in the Epidemiology Division, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women?s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford?s Epidemiology faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2013. Dr. Simard? studies outcomes in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, but has shifted much of her focus to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease. In 2014 she was awarded a five-year K career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. She is also interested in disentangling social and biological constructs in the reported disparities in SLE with respect to sex, gender, race, and ethnicity, both from the etiologic and outcomes perspectives.

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