School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 25 Results

  • Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D.

    Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D.

    Redlich Professor, Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Multiple NIH funded projects to characterize CNS mechanisms of human pain. Comparative effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy and chronic pain self-management within the context of opioid reduction (PCORI funded). Single session pain catastrophizing treatment: comparative efficacy & mechanisms (NIH R01). Development and implementation of an open-source learning healthcare system, CHOIR (http://choir/stanford.edu), to optimize pain care and innovative research in real-world patients.

  • Matthew Markert

    Matthew Markert

    Affiliate, Neurology

    Bio I am a clinical research neuroscientist in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford Hospital. I completed my training at The University of Kansas Hospital in Kansas City, and graduated from the physician scientist training program at The University of Miami - Miller School of Medicine where I conducted research in imaging surrogate markers of neurovascular disease and public health epidemiology. Miami and Kansas City are also where I developed a passion for global health, and were my home when traveling to formative experiences in disaster response and health management in austere conditions.

    After completing my doctoral research training I spent time at the NIH/NINDS Intramural Studies program to develop physiologic and neuroimaging markers of psychoactive exposure (e.g. MDMA, THC, JWH018/073), including clinical trials as they related to subject report of the emotional or hallucinatory influence of those drugs. I became interested in epilepsy as a clinical method for defining the interface of human consciousness and behavior, especially as consciousness is modified by pharmacology (e.g. anticonvulsants), structural change (e.g. surgical excision), electrical interference (e.g. brain/machine interface), and emotional control (e.g. stress vs. mindfulness).

    The core of my intellectual passion is functional interface with the brain, especially sensation and perception, towards multi-modal network regulation to include feedback with bidirectional information transfer among users. My first publication was a novel microelectrode for increasing bio-compatibility in a deep somatosensory implant, and the purpose of my medical training is to identify populations where reimbursable treatment procedures and diagnostic methods can power next generation developments within the scope of clinical practice. The existing tools of Vagal Nerve Stimulation (VNS), Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) and Responsive NeuroStimulation (NeuroPace) are just a few of those procedures, with advancements from the DARPA human interface initiative becoming closer every day. Breakthroughs in data analytics and machine learning are as necessary as device design to bring neural interface technology to into common use, and to the forum of noninvasive consumer-grade methods with reduced risk compared to those that presently require a surgeon or neurologist to play gatekeeper. The trajectory of these efforts is not only more effective neuromodulatory treatments for epilepsy and other neurocognitive pathology, but also the application potential for neurofeedback in the awake and conscious adult (e.g. gauges of attention, memory, emotion), transmission of information between users, and performance enhancement. In addition to the individual benefit for patients and perhaps an improved general understanding of human consciousness, capture of neurologic markers on a population scale will allow us to identify emergent properties in cognitive networks, especially as they relate to behavior, early diagnosis, and treatment optimization. Co-development with creative technological minds is necessary to share platforms that will deliver meaningful use outside of the research environment.

    I am a participating investigator in several clinical trials, including mobile application and artificially intelligent machine learning for predicting medication effectiveness, and non-invasive neuromodulation for human cognitive performance enhancement (rTMS). I am always willing to connect the willing with an opportunity to help, feel free to contact me if you have a sense our interests would align - send me a message with your idea, or your ability to support research or technology advancement projects in these areas.

  • William J Marks

    William J Marks

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Marks received an Honors Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Marquette University and his Medical Degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He completed his neurology residency and fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Marks also holds a Master of Science in Health Care Management degree from the Harvard School of Public Health.

    Dr. Marks is Board Certified in Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology. Prior to joining the Stanford Faculty, he served as Professor of Neurology at UCSF. His clinical and research interests include movement disorders, epilepsy, neuromodulation, health technology, and health care policy.

    Dr. Marks also serves as Head of Clinical Neurology at Verily Life Sciences, formerly Google Life Sciences?a translational research and engineering organization focused on improving healthcare by applying scientific and technological advances to significant problems in health and biology. At Verily, Dr. Marks is responsible for developing and implementing strategies and initiatives that will advance the understanding of neurological disorders to ultimately improve patient outcomes.

  • Kimford Meador, MD

    Kimford Meador, MD

    Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Meador is a Professor of Neurology and Neurosciences at Stanford University, and Clinical Director, Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Center. Dr. Meador graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Applied Biology (with high honor) and received his MD from the Medical College of Georgia. After an internship at the University of Virginia and service as an officer in the Public Health Corps, he completed a residency in Neurology at the Medical College of Georgia and a fellowship in Behavioral Neurology at the University of Florida. Dr. Meador joined the faculty at the Medical College of Georgia (1984-2002) where he became the Charbonnier Professor of Neurology. He was the Chair of Neurology at Georgetown University (2002-2004), the Melvin Greer Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience at the University of Florida (2004-2008) where he served as Director of Epilepsy Program and Director of the Clinical Alzheimer Research Program, and Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics at Emory University (2008-2013) where he served as Director of Epilepsy and of Clinical Neurocience Research. He joined the faculty of Stanford University in 2013. Dr. Meador has authored over 400 peer-reviewed publications. His research interests include: cognitive mechanisms (e.g., memory and attention); cerebral lateralization; pharmacology and physiology of cognition; mechanisms of perception, consciousness and memory; EEG; epilepsy; epilepsy and pregnancy; preoperative evaluation for epilepsy surgery; intracarotid amobarbital procedure (i.e., Wada test); functional imaging; therapeutic drug trials; neurodevelopmental effects of antiepileptic drugs; psychoimmunology; behavioral disorders (e.g., aphasia, neglect, dementia); and neuropsychiatric disorders. Dr. Meador has served as the PI for a long running NIH multicenter study of pregnancy outcomes in women with epilepsy and their children. Dr. Meador has served on the editorial boards for Clinical Neurophysiology, Epilepsy and Behavior, Epilepsy Currents, Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurology, Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology, and Epilepsy.com. His honors include Resident Teaching Award Medical College of Georgia; Outstanding Young Faculty Award in Clinical Sciences Medical College of Georgia; Distinguished Faculty Award for Clinical Research Medical College of Georgia Lawrence C. McHenry History Award American Academy of Neurology; Dreifuss Abstract Award American Epilepsy Society; Fellow of the American Neurological Association; Diplomat of American Neurologic Association; past Chair of the Section of Behavioral Neurology of American Academy of Neurology; past President of Society for Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology; past President of the Society for Behavioral & Cognitive Neurology; past President of the Southern EEG & Epilepsy Society; ranking in the top 10 experts in epilepsy worldwide by Expertscape; Distinguished Alumnus Award for Professional Achievement, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University 2015; American Epilepsy Society Clinical Research Award; and named award by the American Epilepsy Society: ?Kimford J. Meador Research in Women with Epilepsy Award.?

  • Mitchell Miglis, MD

    Mitchell Miglis, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Sleep disorders in patients with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

  • Rebecca Kate Miller-Kuhlmann

    Rebecca Kate Miller-Kuhlmann

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Rebecca Miller-Kuhlmann, MD, is a board certified Neurologist and a Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences. Her clinical interest focus on the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic conditions. She loves clinical medicine and works actively to maintain a wide-breadth of knowledge in order to best treat complex patients with multiple neurologic conditions. Her year of fellowship training in Clinical Neurology had primary foci in movement disorders, memory/cognitive disorders, and neuromuscular medicine/EMG/NCS studies with supplementary training in multiple sclerosis/neuroimmunology, epilepsy, headache, and therapeutic applications of botulinum toxin.

    As a former public school teacher prior to her medical career, she completed an honors certificate in medical education from Stanford and is passionate about medical education. She served as an education chief resident during her training and deeply enjoys working with medical students and residents both in the classroom and in the clinic.

    Her additional academic interests include mitigation of the epidemic of physician burnout, for which she is a graduate of the American Academy of Neurology's Live Well Lead Well Leadership program and has co-developed and directs a wellness & mentorship program for neurology residents and fellows. She has also completed the Stanford CELT (clinical education leadership training) program for developing skills in quality improvement and enjoys teaching and fostering quality improvement work within the Stanford Neurology Residency.

  • Michelle Monje

    Michelle Monje

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, of Pediatrics, of Pathology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Monje Lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of postnatal neurodevelopment. This includes microenvironmental influences on neural precursor cell fate choice in normal neurodevelopment and in disease states.

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