School of Medicine


Showing 1-58 of 58 Results

  • Michael Ma

    Michael Ma

    Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab aims to understand the biomechanics that govern a wide spectrum of congenital heart defects, and how those biomechanics change with contemporary operative repair strategies. We simulate operations virtually via CFD, and in ex vivo and in vivo animal models, and analyze how the changes we make alter fluid flow, pressure, and stresses throughout the system. We hope that these experiments can impact and optimize existing techniques that translate quickly to the operating room.

  • David Maahs

    David Maahs

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr David M. Maahs is Professor of Pediatrics and Division Chief of Pediatric Endocrinology at Stanford University and the Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital. He earned his MD followed by Pediatric Residency at the University of New Mexico. After 3 years on New Mexico?s faculty, Dr. Maahs completed a Pediatric Endocrinology fellowship and a concurrent PhD in Epidemiology at the University of Colorado. He remained on Colorado?s faculty for 10 years, advancing to Professor of Pediatrics before moving to Stanford. Prior to his medical career, Dr. Maahs received a BA and MA in English from the University of Kansas and was inspired to pursue a medical career after serving in the Peace Corps with assignments in Tunisia and the Central African Republic.

    Dr. Maahs? leadership experiences include being a past co-Chair (2013-16) for Protocols and Publications with the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange for which he continues as a Steering Committee member and Director of International Collaborations. This complements his role as Secretary-General for the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2016-20) and Editor-in-Chief for the 2018 ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines. He currently serves on the Professional Practice Committee for the American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2016-18), which writes the annual ADA Standards of Care. Previously, he served on the ADA Scientific Sessions committee representing the Council on Youth. He has also served on national committees for the American Heart Association, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and multiple journal editorial boards and review committees.

    His scholarly interest is improving care and preventing complications in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Along with Dr Peter Chase, he is author of the 12th and 13th editions of Understanding Diabetes, or ?Pink Panther,? which are the most widely used educational books for children newly diagnosed with T1D, distributed internationally by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF). More specifically, he has conducted epidemiologic studies that help generate hypotheses for clinical studies, including trials to develop artificial pancreas systems to improve glucose control, lower disease burden, and prevent diabetic complications. He is author or co-author of over 300 research publications. His multi-disciplinary research has been funded by the JDRF, the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the Helmsley Charitable Trust, and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

    Dr Maahs is Associate Director for the recently formed and NIDDK P30 funded Stanford University Diabetes Research Center (https://sdrc.stanford.edu). His collaborations extend to his role as Principal Investigator (PI) or steering committee member for NIH funded multi-center clinical trials including the FLEX, PERL, and ACTION studies as well as multiple Artificial Pancreas clinical trials. Education, mentorship, and training leadership includes being Program Director with Dr. Georgeanna Klingensmith on the Barbara Davis Center T32 and K12 training grants in Pediatric Endocrinology while at the University of Colorado. He is the PI on the Stanford NIH funded K12 "Training Research Leaders in Type 1 Diabetes.'

    While in the Peace Corps, David met his wife, Christine Walravens, who is also a Pediatrician at Stanford. They enjoy outdoor activities and traveling with their children, Nicholas (22) and Natalia (16).

  • Crystal Mackall

    Crystal Mackall

    Ernest and Amelia Gallo Family Professor and Professor of Pediatrics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Recent clinical studies, by us and others, have demonstrated that T cell based immunotherapy can eradicate cancers resistant to all other available therapies. Our program creates, develops and optimizes genetically engineered T cells to treat cancer. We link the bench with the bedside, developing novel therapies for early phase testing in clinical trials, while simultaneously conducting intensive studies on clinical samples obtained from patients treated on immunotherapy trials.

  • Holden Maecker

    Holden Maecker

    Professor (Research) of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I'm interested in immune monitoring of T cell responses to chronic pathogens and cancer, and the correlation of T cell response signatures with disease protection.

  • Kelly Mahaney

    Kelly Mahaney

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Mahaney is a Pediatric Neurosurgeon with clinical interest in Hydrocephalus, Craniovertebral Junction abnormalities, Spasticity, Spinal dysraphism and Myelomeningocele, Central Nervous System tumors, and Pediatric Epilepsy surgery. She completed residency training at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and subspecialty Pediatric Neurosurgery training at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and the Barrow Neurologic Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital. She is interested in advancing Neuro-endoscopic techniques in Pediatric Neurosurgical practice. Dr. Mahaney's research focuses on delineating the role of iron in the development of post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus.

  • Megan Mahoney

    Megan Mahoney

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Stanford Primary Care delivers innovative, high-quality, personalized and holistic care for patients and families throughout their lives. We are leading the shift from a health care system focused on medical care for individual patients toward an integrated health system focused on health and wellness of a population. Stanford Primary Care partners with multiple stakeholders across Stanford Health Care and Stanford University to achieve the quadruple aim.

  • Ravindra Majeti MD, PhD

    Ravindra Majeti MD, PhD

    RZ Cao Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Majeti lab focuses on the molecular/genomic characterization and therapeutic targeting of leukemia stem cells in human hematologic malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our lab uses experimental hematology methods, stem cell assays, genome editing, and bioinformatics to define and investigate drivers of leukemia stem cell behavior. As part of these studies, we have led the development and application of robust xenotransplantation assays for human hematopoietic cells.

  • Yvonne Maldonado

    Yvonne Maldonado

    Senior Associate Dean, Faculty Development and Diversity, Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on epidemiologic aspects of viral vaccines and perinatal HIV infection. This includes the molecular epidemiology of factors affecting the immunogenicity of oral polio vaccine (OPV) in developing areas of the world, and now the epidemiology of transmission and circulation of vaccine derived polioviruses in order to assist in global eradication of polio. I also work in development of methods to prevent breastfeeding transmission of HIV in Africa.

  • M. Peter Marinkovich, MD

    M. Peter Marinkovich, MD

    Associate Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Marinkovich lab studies the function of epithelial extracellular matrix molecules, including integrins, collagens and laminins in epithelial development and carcinoma progression. We apply our discoveries in this area towards development of molecular therapies for carcinomas, hair disease and inherited epithelial adhesive disorders.

  • John D. Mark

    John D. Mark

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Pulmonary Medicine

    Bio Dr. Mark received his medical degree from the University of Kansas and completed his residency in pediatrics at Children?s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri. He then completed a fellowship in pediatric pulmonary medicine at the University of Rochester, Rochester, New York. In 1999, Dr. Mark completed the first fellowship in Pediatric Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona. He practices at Packard Children?s Hospital where he utilizes non-conventional approaches with patients who have chronic illnesses such asthma and cystic fibrosis. He is interested in nutrition and the mind/body approach to healing in an effort to decrease dependence on medication.

    Dr. Mark is the Program Director for the Pediatric Pulmonary fellowship program, Associate Director for the Pediatric residency program and the Medical Director for the Coordinating and Optimizing Resources Effectively (CORE) Program at Packard Children?s Hospital, Stanford University. This innovative program assists with care coordination and communication with all health care providers for children with complex medical needs.

  • Ellen Markman

    Ellen Markman

    Senior Associate Dean for the Social Sciences and the Lewis M. Terman Professor

    Bio Markman?s research interests include the relationship between language and thought; early word learning; categorization and induction; theory of mind and pragmatics; implicit theories and conceptual change, and how theory-based explanations can be effective interventions in health domains.

  • Alison Marsden

    Alison Marsden

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab at Stanford develops novel computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, and medical devices. We have a particular interest in pediatric cardiology, and use virtual surgery to design novel surgical concepts for children born with heart defects.

  • Olivia Martinez

    Olivia Martinez

    Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Host-Pathogen interactions; EBV B cell lymphomas; pathways of immune evasion in the growth and survival of EBV B cell lymphomas; mechanisms of graft rejection and tolerance induction; stem cell and solid organ transplantation.

  • Melissa Mavers

    Melissa Mavers

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio I am a physician scientist at Stanford University/Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital, with a clinical and research focus in stem cell transplantation. Prior training includes earning MD and PhD degrees through the combined program at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, where I investigated the role of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production and treating inflammatory diseases. This project led to the publication of two first-author peer-reviewed articles, several middle-author publications, and a significant review article. I subsequently completed Pediatrics residency at the University of California Los Angeles/Mattel Children's Hospital and Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship at Stanford. Currently I'm an Instructor of Pediatrics in the division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine.

    My long-term career goal is to develop a research program focusing on immune tolerance in stem cell transplantation and become a leader in the development of improved therapies for preventing or treating graft-versus-host disease. As such, I am excited about my ongoing work in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Negrin, focusing on the expansion and functional enhancement of regulatory T cells and invariant natural killer T cells. This work is currently supported by a St. Baldrick?s Foundation Fellowship, and has previously received funding from the Stanford Child Health Research Institute.

  • Sean McGhee

    Sean McGhee

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Immunology and Allergy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Bioinformatics

  • Tracey McLaughlin

    Tracey McLaughlin

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. McLaughlin conducts clinical research related to obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Current studies include: 1) the impact of macronutrient composition on metabolism, DM2 and CVD; 2) comparison of different weight loss diets on metabolism and CVD risk reduction ; 3) role of adipocytes and adipose tissue immune cells in modulating insulin resistance; 4) use of continuous glucose monitoring and multi-omics to define metabolic phenotype and precision diets

  • Jennifer A McNab

    Jennifer A McNab

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research is focused on developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods that probe brain tissue microstructure. This requires new MRI contrast mechanisms, strategic encoding and reconstruction schemes, physiological monitoring, brain tissue modeling and validation. Applications of these methods include neuronavigation, neurosurgical planning and the development of improved biomarkers for brain development, degeneration, disease and injury.

  • Peter Meaney

    Peter Meaney

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Meaney is a nationally and internationally recognized pediatric resuscitation scientist, and his current focus is on improving care for seriously ill children at the community clinic and district hospital level in low and middle income countries. Dr Meaney seeks to conduct the necessary research to pioneer, implement and evaluate innovative yet relevant and practical solutions to improve the quality of care for seriously ill or injured children worldwide.

  • Rishi Mediratta

    Rishi Mediratta

    Clinical Instructor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have developed a new promising neonatal mortality prediction score at the University of Gondar Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Gondar, Ethiopia. The score predicts approximately 84% of neonatal deaths in the NICU using clinical variables. I have a dataset over 800 NICU admissions in Gondar. I am recruiting scholars who are interested in conducting clinical and epidemiological research to validate, refine, and implement the mortality score to reduce neonatal mortality in Ethiopia.

  • Kara Davis Meister

    Kara Davis Meister

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery Divisions

    Bio Kara D. Meister, MD, is a pediatric otolaryngologist and head & neck surgeon. She received her medical degree from Medical University of South Carolina and completed her otolaryngology residency at University of Pittsburgh. She completed a NIH funded fellowship in head and neck research at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Meister then went on to complete a pediatric otolaryngology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital Stanford.

    She is currently a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department Otolaryngology, Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, at Stanford University. Dr. Meister?s research interest involves understanding the use of technology to diagnose and treat pediatric patients, specifically the use of point-of-care ultrasonography. Her clinical interests include airway evaluation and reconstruction, voice and swallowing problems, and treatment of patients with head and neck masses including thyroid nodules and cancer. She is Co-Director, Surgical, of the Children's Thyroid Center at Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital Stanford and is a participating surgeon in the Aerodigestive and Airway Reconstruction Center at Stanford Children?s Health.

    Clinical Expertise:
    Children's Thyroid Center, Co-Director, Surgical
    Aerodigestive and Airway Reconstruction Center
    Head and Neck masses
    Vocal Cord Dysfunction Clinic
    Voice Clinic
    Fetal Airway and Exit Team

    Commonly treated diagnoses: Pediatric thyroid cancer, pediatric thyroid masses, Pediatric Head and Neck masses, subglottic stenosis, airway reconstruction, laryngeal reconstruction, tracheal stenosis, noisy breathing, tracheostomy, stridor, complete tracheal rings, vocal fold paralysis, bronchoscopy, Aerodigestive and Airway Reconstruction Center, Vocal Cord Dysfunction, pediatric voice disorders, Vascular Anomalies, Fetal Airway and Exit Surgery

  • Elizabeth Mellins

    Elizabeth Mellins

    Professor of Pediatrics (Human Gene Therapy) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms and intracellular pathways of antigen processing and presentation; structure/function of HLA-DR,-DM, -DO; mechanisms underlying HLA allele association with disease; disease mechanisms in systemic idiopathic juveile arthritis, recently found to be an HLA-linked disease.

  • Nicholas Melosh

    Nicholas Melosh

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

    Bio The Melosh group explores how to apply new methods from the semiconductor and self-assembly fields to important problems in biology, materials, and energy. We think about how to rationally design engineered interfaces to enhance communication with biological cells and tissues, or to improve energy conversion and materials synthesis. In particular, we are interested in seamlessly integrating inorganic structures together with biology for improved cell transfection and therapies, and designing new materials, often using diamondoid molecules as building blocks.
    My group is very interested in how to design new inorganic structures that will seamless integrate with biological systems to address problems that are not feasible by other means. This involves both fundamental work such as to deeply understand how lipid membranes interact with inorganic surfaces, electrokinetic phenomena in biologically relevant solutions, and applying this knowledge into new device designs. Examples of this include ?nanostraw? drug delivery platforms for direct delivery or extraction of material through the cell wall using a biomimetic gap-junction made using nanoscale semiconductor processing techniques. We also engineer materials and structures for neural interfaces and electronics pertinent to highly parallel data acquisition and recording. For instance, we have created inorganic electrodes that mimic the hydrophobic banding of natural transmembrane proteins, allowing them to ?fuse? into the cell wall, providing a tight electrical junction for solid-state patch clamping. In addition to significant efforts at engineering surfaces at the molecular level, we also work on ?bridge? projects that span between engineering and biological/clinical needs. My long history with nano- and microfabrication techniques and their interactions with biological constructs provide the skills necessary to fabricate and analyze new bio-electronic systems.


    Research Interests:
    Bio-inorganic Interface
    Molecular materials at interfaces
    Self-Assembly and Nucleation and Growth

  • Fernando S. Mendoza

    Fernando S. Mendoza

    Associate Dean of Minority Advising and Programs and Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have two research interests: childhood health disparities and workforce diversity. My research on childhood health disparities centers on Latino and immigrant children with a focus on early childhood health and development. My work in workforce diversity examines the pipeline for diversity in academic pediatrics, with special attention on the pipeline for underrepresent minorities.

  • Vinod Menon

    Vinod Menon

    Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests EXPERIMENTAL, CLINICAL AND THEORETICAL SYSTEMS NEUROSCIENCE

    Cognitive neuroscience; Systems neuroscience; Cognitive development; Psychiatric neuroscience; Functional brain imaging; Dynamical basis of brain function; Nonlinear dynamics of neural systems.

  • Ross Metzger

    Ross Metzger

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Development, maintenance, and repair of the pulmonary circulation

  • Everett Meyer

    Everett Meyer

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research focus in T cell immunotherapy and T cell immune monitoring using high-throughput sequencing and genomic approaches, with an emphasis on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the treatment of graft-versus-host disease and immune tolerance induction.

  • Timothy Meyer

    Timothy Meyer

    Stanford University Professor of Nephrology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Inadequate removal of uremic solutes contributes to widespread illness in the more than 500,000 Americans maintained on dialysis. But we know remarkably little about these solutes. Dr. Meyer's research efforts are focused on identifying which uremic solutes are toxic, how these solutes are made, and how their production could be decreased or their removal could be increased. We should be able to improve treatment if we knew more about what we are trying to remove.

  • Tobias Meyer

    Tobias Meyer

    Mrs. George A. Winzer Professor in Cell Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests CELLULAR INFORMATION PROCESSING. We are using live single-cell microscopy approaches to understand the design principles of cell signaling circuits. Mammalian signaling processes have a unique logic due to the large number of signaling proteins, second messengers and chromatin modifiers involved in each decision process. We are particularly interested in understanding how cells make decisions to enter and exit the cell cycle and how they decide to polarize and move.

  • Emmanuel Mignot, MD, PhD

    Emmanuel Mignot, MD, PhD

    Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The research focus of the laboratory is the study of sleep and sleep disorders such as narcolepsy and Kleine Levin syndrome. We also study the neurobiological and genetic basis of the EEG and develop new tools to study sleep using nocturnal polysomnography. Approaches mostly involve human genetic studies (GWAS, sequencing), EEG signal analysis, and immunology (as narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease of the brain).

  • Carlos Milla

    Carlos Milla

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pulmonary Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests have centered on the inflammatory responses that lead to airway disease in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and the metabolic factors that contribute to CF lung disease progression. Current efforts are focused on the understanding of the early events that drive the development of lung disease through the study of infants with CF identified by newborn screening. This includes the development of new diagnostic tools that permit the early detection of lung disease manifestations.

  • Daria Mochly-Rosen

    Daria Mochly-Rosen

    The George D. Smith Professor in Translational Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Two areas: 1. Using rationally-designed peptide inhibitors to study protein-protein interactions in cell signaling. Focus: protein kinase C in heart and large GTPases regulating mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegdenration. 2. Using small molecules (identified in a high throughput screens and synthetic chemistry) as activators and inhibitors of aldehyde dehydrogenases, a family of detoxifying enzymes, and glucose-6-phoshate dehydrogenase, in normal cells and in models of human diseases.

  • Denise M. Monack

    Denise M. Monack

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The primary focus of my research is to understand the genetic and molecular mechanisms of intracellular bacterial pathogenesis. We use several model systems to study complex host-pathogen interactions in the gut and in immune cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells. Ultimately we would like to understand how Salmonella persists within certain hosts for years in the face of a robust immune response.

  • Michelle Monje

    Michelle Monje

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, of Pediatrics, of Pathology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Monje Lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of postnatal neurodevelopment. This includes microenvironmental influences on neural precursor cell fate choice in normal neurodevelopment and in disease states.

  • Stephen B. Montgomery

    Stephen B. Montgomery

    Associate Professor of Pathology, and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We focus on understanding the effects of genome variation on cellular phenotypes and cellular modeling of disease through genomic approaches such as next generation RNA sequencing in combination with developing and utilizing state-of-the-art bioinformatics and statistical genetics approaches. See our website at http://montgomerylab.stanford.edu/

  • Tirin Moore

    Tirin Moore

    Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study neural mechanisms of visual-motor integration and the neural basis of cognition (e.g. attention). We study the activity of single neurons in visual and motor structures within the brain, examine how perturbing that activity affects neurons in other brain structures, and also how it affects the perceptual and

  • Ashby Morrison

    Ashby Morrison

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research interests are to elucidate the contribution of chromatin to mechanisms that promote genomic integrity.

  • Michael Moseley

    Michael Moseley

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests MR physics into tissue contrast mechanisms such as diffusion, perfusion, and functional imaging describes the research direction. Applications of cerebral stroke (brain attacks) and neurocognitive disorders are also being developed from these methods

  • Heather E. Moss, MD, PhD

    Heather E. Moss, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinician scientist with a background in engineering, epidemiology and neuro-ophthalmology. In my research, I combine tools from these disciplines with the goal of understanding and preventing vision loss from optic nerve diseases. My focus is on papilledema, the swelling of the optic nerve head due to elevation in intracranial pressure, which we are characterizing using electrophysiological and imaging techniques. Other areas of interest are peri-operative vision loss and optic neuritis.

  • Richard B. Moss

    Richard B. Moss

    Professor of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Immunopathogenesis of chronic airways diseases of childhood, including cystic fibrosis, asthma, allergic aspergillosis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Translational research: early clinical trials in airways disease of childhood, most notably CF, including gene, cytokine and drug therapy.

  • Philippe Mourrain

    Philippe Mourrain

    Associate Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Bio Expertise: Neurobiology, Molecular Genetics, Developmental Biology, Gene Silencing

    Methodology: Synapse Imaging (Two photon microscopy, Array Tomography), Calcium Imaging (Light Sheet Microscopy/SPIM, Light Field Microscopy), Optogenetics, CLARITY, Tol2 transgenesis, TALENs/CRISPRs, Video tracking and behavior computation.

  • Claudia Mueller

    Claudia Mueller

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Investigations of how children's beliefs of health affect their responses to illness.

  • Gayathree (Gaya) Murugappan, MD

    Gayathree (Gaya) Murugappan, MD

    Instructor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Infertility as a marker of future health
    Biobanking
    Recurrent pregnancy loss

  • David Myung, MD, PhD

    David Myung, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Novel biomaterials to reconstruct the wounded cornea
    Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for corneal and ocular surface regeneration
    Engineered biomolecule therapies for promote corneal wound healing

    Telemedicine in ophthalmology

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