School of Medicine


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  • James Lock

    James Lock

    Eric Rothenberg, MD Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests James Lock, MD, Ph.D. is Professor of Child Psychiatry and Pediatrics in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has taught since 1993. He is board certified in adult as well as child and adolescent psychiatry. He directs the eating disorder program in Child Psychiatry and is active in treatment research for children and adolescents with eating disorders.

  • Anne Juliana Lockman

    Anne Juliana Lockman

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Juliana Lockman is Clinical Associate Professor in the Neuropsychiatry Division of the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. She is also appointed to La Selva Group, where she directs the Functional Neurologic Symptom Disorder (FND) Track within their state-of-the-art residential, partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient programs. She completed residencies in both Neurology at the University of Virginia and Psychiatry at Stanford Hospital & Clinics. Her clinical activities include providing pharmacologic and behavioral care for clients with psychiatric and behavioral conditions in the context of neurological illness, including epilepsy, stroke, movement disorders and others. She also teaches and supervises Stanford residents and fellows in Neuropsychiatry. Professional goals include advancement of research and clinical care and improving access for clients suffering from neuropsychiatric conditions, including FND and related disorders.

  • Andreas Loening

    Andreas Loening

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Body MRI) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab focuses on expanding the capability of MR and PET/MR as it relates to applications in body imaging. Clinical research aims include the application of new or improved MR sequences to increase the speed, robustness, and diagnostic capability of body MR. Translation research aims include exploring new MR contrast mechanisms and contrast agents, such as for the stratification of cancer within the prostate and the evaluation of the lymphatic system.

  • Kyle Loh

    Kyle Loh

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology (Stem Cell)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We have developed a strategy to generate fairly pure populations of various human tissue progenitors in a dish from embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We have delineated the sequential lineage steps through which ESCs diversify into various tissues, and in so doing, developed methods to exclusively induce certain fates at the expense of others. The resultant pure populations of tissue progenitors are the fundamental building blocks for regenerative medicine.

  • Adrienne H. Long, MD, PhD

    Adrienne H. Long, MD, PhD

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio Adrienne H. Long, MD, PhD is a fellow in the Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. Dr. Long attend Northwestern University, where she earned both her BS in biomedical engineering and her MD. Determined to help develop novel treatments for pediatric cancer patients, she took time during medical school to pursue a PhD at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where she helped advance CAR T cell therapies with Dr. Crystal Mackall. Her influential thesis work was the first to identify T cell exhaustion as a critical factor limiting efficacy of CAR therapies (Long et al., Nature Medicine, 2015), and also identified novel methods to enhance CAR therapies for pediatric solid tumor patients (Long/Highfill et al., Cancer Immunology Research, 2016). Dr. Long went on to complete her pediatrics residency training at Boston Children?s Hospital, where she continued her research in cancer immunology with Dr. Nicholas Haining ? this time focusing on strategies to enhance antigen presentation to augment checkpoint blockade (Long et al. Keystone Symposium on Cancer Immunotherapy, 2019). She remains dedicated to a career as a physician-scientist focused on developing novel immunotherapies for children with cancer.

  • Jonathan Z. Long

    Jonathan Z. Long

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory focuses on the endocrine hormones and other circulating hormone-like molecules that regulate mammalian energy metabolism. With modern mass spectrometry, it is now recognized that blood plasma likely contains many more bioactive factors than previously recognized, secreted by cell types that were not previously considered to have endocrine functions. What are the identities of these molecules? What energy stressors do they respond to? Where are they made? What cell types or tissues do they act on? We use chemical biology and mass spectrometry-based technologies as discovery tools. We combine these tools with classical biochemical and genetic approaches in cell and animal models. Our goal is to uncover new endocrine pathways of organismal energy metabolism. Recent studies from our laboratory have identified a family of cold-regulated circulating lipids that stimulate mitochondrial respiration as well as an exercise-stimulated thermogenic polypeptide hormone. We suspect that many more remain to be discovered. We anticipate that our approach will uncover fundamental mechanisms that control mammalian energy homeostasis. In the long term, we hope to translate our discoveries into therapeutic opportunities that matter for metabolic and other age-associated chronic diseases.

  • Sharon R. Long

    Sharon R. Long

    William C. Steere, Jr. - Pfizer Inc. Professor in Biological Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Biochemistry, genetics and cell biology of plant-bacterial symbiosis

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