School of Medicine


Showing 1-12 of 12 Results

  • Peter K.  Jackson

    Peter K.  Jackson

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology (Baxter Labs)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cell cycle and cyclin control of DNA replication .

  • Charlotte D. Jacobs M.D.

    Charlotte D. Jacobs M.D.

    Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical Interests: general oncology, sarcomas. Research Interests: clinical trials in solid tumors.

  • Siddhartha Jaiswal

    Siddhartha Jaiswal

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We identified a common disorder of aging called clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP). CHIP occurs due to certain somatic mutations in blood stem cells and represents a precursor state for blood cancer, but is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. We hope to understand more about the biology and clinical implications of CHIP using human and model system studies.

  • Ted Jardetzky

    Ted Jardetzky

    Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Jardetzky laboratory is studying the structures and mechanisms of macromolecular complexes important in viral pathogenesis, allergic hypersensitivities and the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation, with an interest in uncovering novel conceptual approaches to intervening in disease processes. Ongoing research projects include studies of paramyxovirus and herpesvirus entry mechanisms, IgE-receptor structure and function and TGF-beta ligand signaling pathways.

  • Daniel Jarosz

    Daniel Jarosz

    Assistant Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory studies conformational switches in evolution, disease, and development. We focus on how molecular chaperones, proteins that help other biomolecules to fold, affect the phenotypic output of genetic variation. To do so we combine classical biochemistry and genetics with systems-level approaches. Ultimately we seek to understand how homeostatic mechanisms influence the acquisition of biological novelty and identify means of manipulating them for therapeutic and biosynthetic benefit.

  • Stefanie S. Jeffrey, MD

    Stefanie S. Jeffrey, MD

    John and Marva Warnock Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Jeffrey led the multidisciplinary team from the Schools of Medicine, Engineering, and Genome Technology Center that invented the MagSweeper, an automated device that immunomagnetically captures live circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patient blood for single cell analysis or culture. Her lab also works on microfluidic technologies for tumor cell capture, characterization, and growth - with the goal of defining individual patient response to newer biologically-based cancer therapies.

  • Michael Jeng

    Michael Jeng

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests focus on: 1) histiocytic disorders, such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), and 2) vascular anomalies and malformations.

  • Kristin Jensen

    Kristin Jensen

    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Palo Alto Veteran's Health Care System and at Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinical translational investigator with a primary interest in breast cancer biology, and the use of investigational and clinical ancillary techniques such as gene and tissue microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis and prognosis of this disease. As a practicing cytopathologist, I also have an interest in improving the fine needle aspiration biopsy diagnosis of breast lesions, again using immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis as adjuncts to cytomorphology.

  • Hanlee P. Ji

    Hanlee P. Ji

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cancer genomics and genetics, translational applications of next generation sequencing technologies, development of molecular signatures as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in oncology, primary genomic and proteomic technology development, cancer rearrangements, genome sequencing, big data analysis

  • Esther M. John

    Esther M. John

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. John has extensive expertise in conducting population-based epidemiologic studies and has led as Principal Investigator multiple large-scale studies, including multi-center studies with a study site in the San Francisco Bay Area with its diverse population. Many of her studies and collaborations investigated cancer health disparities. Her research has focused on the role of modifiable lifestyle factors (e.g., body size, physical activity, diet), hormonal factors, early-life exposures, genetic variants, and gene-environment interactions; differences in risk factors by race/ethnicity, breast cancer subtypes, and prostate cancer subtypes; risk factors for familial breast cancer and second primary breast cancer, as well as prognostic factors related to survival disparities.

    As Principal Investigator, Dr. John has led a number of studies conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area, including:

    - the Northern California site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry, an on-going prospective multi-generational cohort of over 13,000 families established in 1995 at six international sites;
    - the Northern California site of the WECARE Study that investigates risk factors for second primary breast cancer;
    - the California site of the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study that investigated genetic variability and breast cancer risk and survival in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white populations in the context of genetic admixture;
    - the Breast Cancer Etiology in Minorities (BEM) Study, a pooled analysis of risk factors for breast cancer subtypes in racial/ethnic minorities;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study in nearly 5,000 Hispanic, African American and non-Hispanic white women that investigated the role of modifiable lifestyle factors and other risk factors;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Prostate Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study of lifestyle and genetic risk factors for advanced and localized disease.

    These studies collected and pooled extensive data and biospecimens and continue to support numerous ancillary studies, collaborations and international consortia and have contributed to a better understanding of cancer risk and survival in racial/ethnic minority populations.

    Dr. John is also a founding PI of the LEGACY Girls Study, an on-going prospective cohort established in 2011 that investigates early life exposures in relation to pubertal development outcomes, breast tissue characteristics, and behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in the context of having a family history or breast cancer.

  • Laura Johnston

    Laura Johnston

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical research in allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), more specifically, allogeneic transplantation and graft versus host disease. Exploring methods of improving prevention and treatment of GVHD as well as the long term follow-up and/or quality of life of affected patients.

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