Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 41 Results

  • Kristina Elizabeth Hawk

    Kristina Elizabeth Hawk

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology - Rad/Nuclear Medicine

    Bio Kristina Elizabeth Hawk, MS MD PhD is a Nuclear Medicine Physician and Neuroradiologist. As a physician scientist, integrated MD/PhD training helped build a foundation to explore translational research efforts, using a full and intricate understanding of the research process, and the developed ability to understand, discuss and teach new emerging concepts. Dr. Hawk?s dissertation in Neuroscience focused on the regulation of Nitric Oxide Synthase in the dorsal and ventral striatum, exploring the neurochemical role of nitric oxide producing interneurons, and their ability to coordinate dopaminergic and glutamatergic signaling in areas of the brain relevant to cognition and motivated behavior.

    Eager to expand her passion into the field of Medical Radiation Physics, she also completed a separate Masters degree in Medical Radiation Physics. This provided her with in depth training of how therapeutic and diagnostic instruments use both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation in the clinical setting. She then completed her Medical Doctorate and Diagnostic Radiology Residency at the University of Southern California (USC), learning the art of medicine while serving the diverse population at Los Angeles County Hospital.

    Dr. Hawk completed clinical fellowship requirements in Nuclear Medicine at USC, and is now Board Certified by the American Board of Nuclear Medicine. She also completed a Neuroradiology fellowship at USC, and is Board Certified the American Board of Radiology. She served as both the Chief Resident and Chief Neuroradiology Fellow.

    Dr. Hawk has held multiple local and national leadership positions, including positions in the American College of Radiology (ACR), the American College of Nuclear Medicine (ACNM) and the Society of Nuclear and Molecular Medicine (SNMMI). Dr. Hawk is an editorial board member of the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR). She has served as the Vice-Chair for Education for the Nuclear Medicine Resident Organization of the ACNM, and the Educational Liaison for the Resident and Fellow Section of the ACR. Currently, she serves on the national ACR Commission for Women and General Diversity as well as the ACR Commission on Nuclear Medicine. Dr. Hawk also sits on the ACR Council Steering Committee.

    Dr. Hawk is committed to continually exploring the beautiful applications of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation to image and treat the human body.

  • Thomas Haywood

    Thomas Haywood

    Senior Research Scientist, Physical, Rad/Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford

    Current Role at Stanford Head of International Radiochemistry Collaborations

  • Jeremy J. Heit, MD, PhD

    Jeremy J. Heit, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research seeks to advance our understanding of cerebrovascular disease and to develop new minimally invasive treatments for these diseases. We study ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, cerebral aneurysms, delayed cerebral ischemia, cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), dural arteriovenous fistulae, and other vascular diseases of the brain. We use state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques to non-invasively study these diseases, and we are developing future endovascular technologies to advance neurointerventional surgery.

    www.heitlab.com

  • Robert Herfkens

    Robert Herfkens

    Professor of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Imaging of cardiovascular diseases with CT, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

  • Carl Herickhoff

    Carl Herickhoff

    Affiliate, Rad/Pediatric Radiology

    Bio Dr. Herickhoff has broad experience in ultrasound research & development, spanning 14 years in both academia and industry (GE Global Research and Philips Medical Systems). He currently serves as Deputy Director of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory, and his current research interests include novel medical ultrasound transducer designs and methods for elasticity, contrast, and flow imaging, and specialized ultrasound imaging systems for pediatrics and interventional procedure guidance.

  • Sanna Elizabeth Herwald

    Sanna Elizabeth Herwald

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio Sanna Herwald received her M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Tufts University. Her Ph.D. research in the field of Microbiology focused on the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans. During her time in the M.D.-Ph.D. program she discovered her interest in Radiology, and the possibilities for visualizing the interaction between microorganisms and the human body.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.