School of Medicine


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  • Paul George, MD, PhD

    Paul George, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests CONDUCTIVE POLYMER SCAFFOLDS FOR STEM CELL-ENHANCED STROKE RECOVERY:
    We focus on developing conductive polymers for stem cell applications. We have created a microfabricated, polymeric system that can continuously interact with its biological environment. This interactive polymer platform allows modifications of the recovery environment to determine essential repair mechanisms. Recent work studies the effect of electrical stimulation on neural stem cells seeded on the conductive scaffold and the pathways by which it enhances stroke recovery Further understanding the combined effect of electrical stimulation and stem cells in augmenting neural repair for clinical translational is a major focus of this research going forward.

    BIOPOLYMER SYSTEMS FOR NEURAL RECOVERY AND STEM CELL MODULATION:
    The George lab develops biomaterials to improve neural recovery in the peripheral and central nervous systems. By controlled release of drugs and molecules through biomaterials we can study the temporal effect of these neurotrophic factors on neural recovery and engineer drug delivery systems to enhance regenerative effects. By identifying the critical mechanisms for stroke and neural recovery, we are able to develop polymeric technologies for clinical translation in nerve regeneration and stroke recovery. Recent work utilizing these novel conductive polymers to differentiate stem cells for therapeutic and drug discovery applications.

    APPLYING ENGINEERING TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE BIOMARKERS FOR STROKE DIAGNOSTICS:
    The ability to create diagnostic assays and techniques enables us to understand biological systems more completely and improve clinical management. Previous work utilized mass spectroscopy proteomics to find a simple serum biomarker for TIAs (a warning sign of stroke). Our study discovered a novel candidate marker, platelet basic protein. Current studies are underway to identify further candidate biomarkers using transcriptome analysis. More accurate diagnosis will allow for aggressive therapies to prevent subsequent strokes.

  • Carl Gold

    Carl Gold

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Gold is a board-certified general neurologist who is fellowship-trained in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders in hospitalized patients. He cares for a broad range of patients, including individuals with seizures, central nervous system infections, autoimmune diseases, headaches, neuromuscular conditions, and neurological complications of cancer. Dr. Gold has a particular clinical interest in the inpatient diagnosis of uncommon or rare neurological disorders. He directs quality improvement for the department of Neurology and is actively involved in projects to improve the experience of hospitalized patients with neurological conditions at Stanford. His primary research interest focuses on enhancing the communication skills of neurology residents and he serves as the Director of the Stanford Neurology Residency Communication Coaching Program. He is also the Fellowship Director of the Stanford Neurohospitalist Fellowship.

    For more information on the Stanford Neurohospitalist Program & Fellowship, please visit: https://med.stanford.edu/neurology/divisions/neurohospitalist.html

    Additional information on Stanford Neurology's efforts in Quality, Safety, & Value can be found here: http://med.stanford.edu/neurology/quality.html

    Learn more about the Stanford Neurology Communication Coaching Program by visiting: http://med.stanford.edu/neurology/education/resident-coaching.html

  • Olga Fedin Goldberg

    Olga Fedin Goldberg

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Goldberg is board-certified in Neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She provides comprehensive neurologic care to patients with a broad range of neurologic conditions, including those who have multiple neurologic conditions. She is interested in medical education for neurology residents and for referring primary care providers and serves as Director of Neurology Resident Continuity Clinic. Additionally, she completed the Stanford CELT (Clinical Education Leadership Training) Program for developing skills in quality improvement. She has led or played a key role in multiple quality improvement projects in the Department of Neurology, including those focused on increasing patient understanding of their neurologic medications upon hospital discharge, improvement of outcomes for headache patients seen in primary care, and in optimizing clinic processes involved in collection of cerebrospinal fluid.

  • Neelam Goyal, MD

    Neelam Goyal, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Goyal specializes in the diagnosis, management, and electrophysiological testing of neuromuscular diseases. Through collaboration with a multidisciplinary team including therapists, research scientists, and ancillary staff, her work focuses on providing state of the art, comprehensive care to patients living with neuromuscular diseases. Her clinical research interests include ALS and sleep, hereditary neuropathies, and neuromuscular junction disorders.

  • Gerald Grant, MD, FACS

    Gerald Grant, MD, FACS

    Endowed Professor in Pediatric Neurosurgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Grant directs a Blood-brain Barrier Translational Laboratory focusing on enhancing drug delivery to brain tumors in children.

  • Maxwell Greene, MD

    Maxwell Greene, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Greene is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist. He is also a Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Greene provides clinical care for adult patients with disorders of the muscles and peripheral nerves that cause weakness and numbness. He specializes in diagnosing and treating neuromuscular diseases that include amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), all types of muscular dystrophy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), myasthenia gravis, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). For CIDP and CMT, Stanford is one of the few centers of excellence in the country.

    A significant part of Dr. Greene?s practice involves investigational work, where he seeks to determine the cause of a patient?s symptoms. In addition to performing the full range of diagnostic tests including interpreting biopsy procedures, he has special qualifications in electrodiagnosis and the use of electromyography and nerve conduction studies.

    Treatments offered by Dr. Greene cover the complete spectrum of options, with an emphasis on immune therapies for certain conditions. For CIDP and myasthenia gravis, he administers immune globulin, steroids, plasmapheresis, and rituximab. To help manage symptoms of CMT and support areas of the body weakened by this disease, he can recommend physical therapy, occupational therapy, and foot, ankle, and knee orthotics.

    For the treatment of ALS and muscular dystrophy, Dr. Greene leads a multidisciplinary team offering physical and occupational therapy, pulmonary expertise, speech and swallow expertise, nutrition counseling, social services, and specialized nursing, and works together with genetic counseling. All team members collaborate closely to ensure patients receive the care and comfort needed to meet their emotional as well as physical needs.

    As part of his commitment to advancing patients? treatment options, Dr. Greene conducts clinical research. Among his current interests are
    innovative new therapies for ALS and other nerve and muscular disorders. This is an exciting time in the field of neuromuscular medicine, with real potential for treatment breakthroughs for the first time in decades. Exploring these new directions enables Dr. Greene to offer Stanford patients access to options that may not be available anywhere else.

    To highlight new advances for his peers, Dr. Greene has made national and regional presentations at conferences including the American Academy of Neurology meeting. Topics include the results of a study supported in part by the National Institutes of Health: paraneoplastic antibodies as markers of Hodgkin?s disease. JAMA Neurology published Dr. Greene?s article on this research.

    Dr. Greene?s achievements have earned recognition from the American Academy of Neurology and other organizations. He is also the recipient of a travel award from the American Neurological Association and a grant from the NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

    A member of the American Academy of Neurology, Dr. Greene is also an active member of the Western ALS Consortium and Northeastern ALS Consortium.

  • Michael Greicius, MD, MPH

    Michael Greicius, MD, MPH

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As the Medical Director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders and Principal Investigator of the Stanford Extreme Phenotypes in Alzheimer's Disease (StEP AD) Cohort, Dr. Greicius' research focuses on elucidating the neurobiologic underpinnings of AD. His lab combines cutting edge brain imaging, "deep" phenotyping, and whole-genome sequencing of human subjects to identify novel pathways involved in AD pathogenesis. The goal of his work is to develop effective treatment for AD patients.

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