School of Medicine


Showing 1-29 of 29 Results

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Ultrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Erpeng Dai

    Erpeng Dai

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Radiological Sciences Laboratory

    Bio Dr. Erpeng Dai mainly focuses on technique development for high-resolution and high-efficiency diffusion MRI (dMRI). Previously, he optimized the navigator acquisition for multi-shot interleaved EPI dMRI and further combined it with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) for improved scan efficiency. Meanwhile, he also merged SMS and multi-slab techniques to achieve high-resolution isotropic imaging. Currently, Erpeng Dai is mainly working on developing high-fidelity and high-resolution dMRI, cortical dMRI and microstructure studies.

  • Heike Daldrup-Link

    Heike Daldrup-Link

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As a physician-scientist involved in the care of pediatric patients and developing novel pediatric molecular imaging technologies, my goal is to link the fields of nanotechnology and medical imaging towards more efficient diagnoses and image-guided therapies. Our research team develops novel imaging techniques for improved cancer diagnosis, for image-guided-drug delivery and for in vivo monitoring of cell therapies in children and young adults.

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-compatible remote manipulation and haptics

    3. Medical Mixed Reality. Currently being explored are methods of fusing patients and their images to potentially improve breast conserving surgery, and other conditions.

  • Guido Davidzon

    Guido Davidzon

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology - Rad/Nuclear Medicine

    Bio Dr. Guido A. Davidzon is a physician-scientist board certified in Nuclear Medicine. He is an attending physician in Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging at Stanford Health Care.

    He graduated with honors from medical school in Argentina and completed an internship at Yale University New-Haven Hospital in Connecticut. He did his residency and was chief resident at Stanford Health Care. He completed a research fellowship in mitochondrial diseases at Columbia University in New York and, a U.S. National Library of Medicine Award supported, Biomedical Informatics fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital in conjunction with a Science Masters at MIT.

    Dr. Davidzon is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University. His clinical specialties include early diagnostic imaging of cancer, coronary artery disease, and dementias using molecular probes as well as the treatment of cancer for which he employs targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy.

    Dr. Davidzon investigates the use of machine learning in medical imaging to improve clinical outcomes, he is involved in the professional Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. He serves as a peer reviewer for multiple medical journals. Dr. Davidzon is a native of Buenos Aires, Argentina and has lived in the U.S. for over a decade. He travels to Argentina frequently, with his wife and three sons.

  • Wendy DeMartini

    Wendy DeMartini

    Professor of Radiology (Breast Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Wendy DeMartini is a Professor and the Chief of the Breast Imaging Division in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. DeMartini completed her fellowship in Breast Imaging at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington. She then served as Breast Imaging faculty at the University of Washington where she became Associate Professor and Associate Director of Clinical Services, and at the University of Wisconsin where she became Professor and Chief of Breast Imaging. Her work is focused upon high quality patient care, clinical research and education.

    Dr. DeMartini has more than 100 research presentations, abstracts/publications, review articles or book chapters. Her research is directed toward the appropriate evidence-based use of imaging tests to optimize the detection and evaluation of breast cancer. She has served as an investigator on several studies of breast MRI funded by the National Cancer Institute and by the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN). Particular research topics have included the development of a pilot tool for predicting the probability of malignancy of breast MRI lesions, assessment of the impact of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on breast MRI accuracy, and evaluation of current utilization patterns of breast MRI and other emerging technologies.

    Dr. DeMartini is a highly sought-after educator. She lectures on a broad spectrum of breast imaging topics nationally and internationally, including in the Americas, Europe, Australasia and Africa. She is also the Co-Director of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Education Center Breast MRI with Biopsy Course. Dr. DeMartini is an active member of many professional organizations and committees, including in the Radiologic Society of North America, the American College of Radiology and the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI). She was elected as an SBI Fellow in 2009, and served as President of the SBI in 2017-2018.

  • Utkan Demirci

    Utkan Demirci

    Professor of Radiology (Canary Cancer Center)

    Bio Dr. Demirci is currently a Professor with tenure at Stanford University School of Medicine and Principal Investigator of the Demirci Bio-Acoustic MEMS in Medicine (BAMM) Lab at the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection. He received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1999 as a James B. Angell Scholar (summa cum laude) from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He received his M.S. degree in 2001 in Electrical Engineering, M.S. degree in Management Science and Engineering in 2005, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2005, all from Stanford University.

    BAMM Lab specializes in applying micro- and nanoscale technologies to problems in medicine and early cancer detection at the interface between micro/nanoscale engineering and medicine. Our goal is to apply innovative technologies to clinical problems. Our major research theme focuses on creating new microfluidic technology platforms targeting broad applications in medicine. In this interdisciplinary space at the convergence of engineering, biology and materials science, we create novel technologies for disposable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and monitoring of infectious diseases, cancer and controlling cellular microenvironment in nanoliter droplets for biopreservation and microscale tissue engineering applications. These applications are unified around our expertise to test the limits of cell manipulation by establishing microfluidic platforms to provide solutions to real world problems at the clinic.

    Our lab creates technologies to manipulate cells in nanoliter volumes to enable solutions for real world problems in medicine including applications in infectious disease diagnostics and monitoring for global health, cancer early detection, cell encapsulation in nanoliter droplets for cryobiology, and bottom-up tissue engineering. Dr. Demirci has published over 120 peer reviewed publications in journals including PNAS, Nature Communications, Advanced Materials, Small, Trends in Biotechnology, Chemical Society Reviews and Lab-chip, over 150 conference abstracts and proceedings, 10+ book chapters, and an edited book. His work was highlighted in Wired Magazine, Nature Photonics, Nature Medicine, MIT Technology Review, Reuters Health News, Science Daily, AIP News, BioTechniques, and Biophotonics. He is fellow-elect of the American Institute of Biological and Medical Engineering (AIMBE, 2017). His scientific work has been recognized by numerous national and international awards including the NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award (2012), the IEEE-EMBS Early Career Achievement Award (2012), Scientist of the year award from Stanford radiology Department (2017). He was selected as one of the world?s top 35 young innovators under the age of 35 (TR-35) by the MIT Technology Review at the age of 28. In 2004, he led a team that won the Stanford University Entrepreneur?s Challenge Competition and Global Start-up Competition in Singapore. His work has been translated to start-up companies including DxNow, KOEK Biotechnology and LEVITAS. There has been over 10,000 live births in the US, Europe, Asia, and Middle East using the sperm selection technology that came out of Dr. Demirci's lab.

  • Terry Desser

    Terry Desser

    Professor of Radiology (Abdominal Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Imaging of gastrointestinal tract cancer
    Ultrasound
    Simulated learning environment

  • Tommaso Di Ianni

    Tommaso Di Ianni

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Radiology

    Bio I am a postdoctoral research fellow at Stanford School of Medicine in the Department of Radiology. My primary research focus is in the development of cutting-edge technological innovations for imaging and noninvasive targeted drug delivery based on ultrasound. I strive to implement tools with high potential for clinical translation and aim at producing a substantial impact on the clinical practice.

    At the moment, I am working on the systematic and noninvasive manipulation of the nervous system by using focused ultrasound combined with ultrasound-activated drug carriers. In addition, I am implementing functional imaging of brain-wide neuronal activity based on power Doppler ultrasound as a readout of the neuromodulation.

  • Jennifer Dionne

    Jennifer Dionne

    Senior Associate Vice Provost for Research Platforms/Shared Facilities, Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Bio Jennifer Dionne is the Senior Associate Vice Provost of Research Platforms/Shared Facilities and an Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Radiology (by courtesy) at Stanford. Jen received her Ph.D. in Applied Physics at the California Institute of Technology, advised by Harry Atwater, and B.S. degrees in Physics and Systems & Electrical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining Stanford, she served as a postdoctoral researcher in Chemistry at Berkeley, advised by Paul Alivisatos. Jen's research develops nanophotonic methods to observe and control chemical and biological processes as they unfold with nanometer scale resolution, emphasizing critical challenges in global health and sustainability. Her work has been recognized with the Alan T. Waterman Award (2019), an NIH Director's New Innovator Award (2019), a Moore Inventor Fellowship (2017), the Materials Research Society Young Investigator Award (2017), Adolph Lomb Medal (2016), Sloan Foundation Fellowship (2015), and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2014), and was featured on Oprah?s list of ?50 Things that will make you say ?Wow!'"

  • Bao Do

    Bao Do

    Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated), Rad/Musculoskeletal Imaging

    Bio Clinical Associate Professor of Radiology (Affiliated), Stanford University
    Affiliated faculty, Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics Section, Stanford University
    Research: http://www.stanford.edu/~baodo

  • Robert Dodd, MD, PhD

    Robert Dodd, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery, of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Dodd is involved in clinical trials using endovascular coils that have a fiber coating that help heal aneurysms of the neck and can prevent an aneurysm from reforming. He uses minimally invasive endoscopic techniques to treat brain tumors.

    Dodd's research interests are in cerebral blood vessel reactivity and stroke.

  • Lane Donnelly

    Lane Donnelly

    Professor of Radiology and of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Bio Lane F. Donnelly MD is currently Chief Quality Officer and Christopher G. Dawes Endowed Director of Quality at Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital and Stanford Children?s Health. He is also a Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics and the Associate Dean, Maternal and Child Health (Quality and Safety) in the School of Medicine at Stanford University. He also serves as the Co-Executive Director of Stanford Medicine Center for Improvement.

    Dr. Donnelly has been an NIH funded researcher, has published 278 peer review manuscripts that have been cited over 10,000 times and has authored multiple textbooks, including Pediatric Imaging: The Fundamentals, a lead selling text book on pediatric imaging. Many improvement projects for which he was a contributor have received multiple national recognitions including International Quality Radiology Network?s Quality-Improvement in Radiology Practices Paper Competition: Annual Award 2008 (Paper of the Year); Caffey Award ? for Outstanding Presented Paper, Society for Pediatric Radiology (2001, 2009, 2011); 2012 British Medical Association Book Awards; Singleton?Taybi Award for Lifetime Achievements in Education, Society for Pediatric Radiology (2009); Journal of the America College of Radiology 2018 Paper of the Year Award; and the 2009 Best Scientific Paper Award - Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and the RSNA Honored Educator Award (2019). Dr. Donnelly has served on the Board of Trustees for both the American Board of Radiology and the Society for Pediatric Radiology.

    Former Leadership positions include Radiologist-in-Chief and Frederic N. Silverman Chair of Pediatric Radiology as well as Executive Cabinet member at Cincinnati Children?s Hospital Medical Center (2002-2011); Inaugural Chief Medical Officer / Physician-in-Chief at the Nemours Children?s Hospital (helping plan, staff, and open the greenfield hospital in 2012) and Enterprise Vice President as well as Enterprise Radiologist-in-Chief for the Nemours Foundation (2011-2015); and Chief Quality Officer for Hospital Based Services at Texas Children?s Hospital (2015-2017). He was educated at The Ohio State University and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

  • Seraina A Dual

    Seraina A Dual

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Radiological Sciences Laboratory

    Bio Seraina A. Dual is a postodoctoral fellow at the departments of Radiology at Stanford Medicine and Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, mentored by Prof. Doff McElHinney, Prof. Daniel Ennis, and Prof. Alison Marsden. She graduated with a Bachelor's degree from the Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich) in Mechanical Engineering, a master's degree at ETH Zurich in Mechanical Engineering with a specialization in robotics and biomedical application with Prof. Roger Gassert, and her Dr. of science at ETH Zurich in Mechanical Engineering with Prof. Mirko Meboldt. During this time, she spent some time with Prof. Ellen Kuhl at Stanford University (BSc), with Prof. Theo Chee Leong at National University of Singapore (MSc), and with Prof. Christopher Hayward at the St. Vincent's Hospital in Sydney (DSc). Her work focuses on developing dynamic systems, algorithms, and sensors inspired by her background in engineering and control methodology to either improve our pathophysiological understanding of disease or enable physiological interaction of patients with intelligent medical devices.

  • Gozde Durmus

    Gozde Durmus

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Durmus' research focuses on applying micro/nano-technologies to investigate cellular heterogeneity for single-cell analysis and personalized medicine. At Stanford, she is developing platform technologies for sorting and monitoring cells at the single-cell resolution. This magnetic levitation-based technology is used for wide range of applications in medicine, such as, label-free detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood; high-throughput drug screening; and rapid detection and monitoring of antibiotic resistance in real-time. During her PhD, she has engineered nanoparticles and nanostructured surfaces to decrease antibiotic-resistant infections.

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