School of Medicine


Showing 21-27 of 27 Results

  • Rodrigo Martin Braga

    Rodrigo Martin Braga

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Rodrigo trained with Robert Leech and Richard Wise at Imperial College London, where he obtained his Ph.D. investigating the neural systems involved in top-down attention to auditory and visual modalities. Rodrigo was awarded a Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship to travel to Harvard University to work with Randy Buckner. There he developed methods to characterize functional networks within individuals and using high-resolution mapping techniques at high-magnetic-strength 7T MRI. Rodrigo holds a K99 Pathway to Independence Award from the National Institute of Health, and currently works with Josef Parvizi and Russ Poldrack.

    Rodrigo?s research aims to understand the function and physiology of the distributed networks that occupy association cortex. A long-standing hypothesis is that these large-scale networks are specialized and interact to enable different cognitive processes. Revealing the nature of these specializations requires functional imaging to be conducted with enough precision to resolve functional zones that are finely juxtaposed and interdigitated along the complex geometry of the cortical surface. Rodrigo uses dense-sampling fMRI techniques that can delineate functional anatomy with precision within individuals. At Stanford, Rodrigo is combining fMRI network mapping with intracranial methods that can reveal the electrophysiological basis of the distributed networks, including how network regions interact to form networks, and how different networks interact to perform cognitive functions.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • Axel Brunger

    Axel Brunger

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, of Neurology, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One of Axel Brunger's major goals is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of synaptic neurotransmitter release by conducting imaging and single-molecule/particle reconstitution experiments, combined with near-atomic resolution structural studies of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery.

  • Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanisms of epilepsy, especially temporal lobe epilepsy.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how to make recovery faster and better after stroke.

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