School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 18 Results

  • Stephen A. Baccus

    Stephen A. Baccus

    Associate Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study how the neural circuitry of the vertebrate retina encodes visual information and performs computations. To control and measure the retinal circuit, we present visual images while performing simultaneous two-photon imaging and multielectrode recording. We perturb the circuit as it operates using simultaneous intracellular current injection and multielectrode recording, and use the resulting large data sets to construct models of retinal computation.

  • Ben Barres

    Ben Barres

    Professor of Neurobiology, of Developmental Biology and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab is interested in the neuronal-glial interactions that underlie the development and function of the mammlian central nervous system.

  • Thomas Clandinin

    Thomas Clandinin

    Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Clandinin lab focuses on understanding how neuronal circuits assemble and function to perform specific computations and guide behavior. Taking advantage of a rich armamentarium of genetic tools available in the fruit fly, combined with imaging, physiology and analytical techniques drawn from systems neuroscience, we examine a variety of visual circuits.

  • Surya Ganguli

    Surya Ganguli

    Assistant Professor of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Neurobiology and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Theoretical / computational neuroscience

  • Lisa Giocomo

    Lisa Giocomo

    Assistant Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the organization of cortical circuits important for spatial navigation and memory. We are particularly focused on medial entorhinal cortex, where many neurons fire in spatially specific patterns and thus offer a measurable output for molecular manipulations. We combine electrophysiology, genetic approaches and behavioral paradigms to unravel the mechanisms and behavioral relevance of non-sensory cortical organization. Our first line of research is focused on determining the cellular and molecular components crucial to the neural representation of external space by functionally defined cell types in entorhinal cortex (grid, border and head direction cells). We plan to use specific targeting of ion channels, combined with in vivo tetrode recordings, to determine how channel dynamics influence the neural representation of space in the behaving animal. A second, parallel line of research, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods to further parse out ionic expression patterns in entorhinal cortices and determine how gradients in ion channels develop. Ultimately, our work aims to understand the ontogenesis and relevance of medial entorhinal cortical topography in spatial memory and navigation.

  • Eric I. Knudsen

    Eric I. Knudsen

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cellular mechanisms of spatial attention and learning, studied in the central nervous system in birds, using behavioral, systems, cellular and molecular techniques.

  • Liqun Luo

    Liqun Luo

    Professor of Biology and, by courtesy, of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are studying how neural circuits are assembled during development, and how they contribute to sensory perception. We are addressing these questions at different levels from molecular, cellular, circuit to animal behavior. We are primarily using Drosophila as a model organism for our studies. Most recently, we are also developing novel genetic tools in the mouse to extend our studies to the mammalian brain.

  • Uel Jackson McMahan

    Uel Jackson McMahan

    Professor of Neurobiology and of Structural Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are currently investigating mechanisms involved in synaptic transmission and synaptogenesis using electron microscope tomography in ways that provide in situ 3D structural information at macromolecular resolution.

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