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  • Connect the Dots-March 2019. Obstetrics and gynecology Coney, T., Henkel, A., Plisko, A. M., Chescheir, N. C. 2019; 133 (3): 579?81

    View details for DOI 10.1097/AOG.0000000000003151

    View details for PubMedID 30741819

  • Misoprostol as an Adjunct to Overnight Osmotic Dilators Prior to Second Trimester Dilation and Evacuation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Contraception Cahill, E. P., Henkel, A., Shaw, J. G., Shaw, K. A. 2019

    Abstract

    Misoprostol as an Adjunct to Overnight Osmotic Dilators Prior to Second Trimester Dilation and Evacuation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Cahill EP, Henkel AG, Shaw JG, Shaw KA OBJECTIVE: To understand effect of adjunct misoprostol with overnight osmotic dilators for dilation and evacuation for cervical preparation after 16 weeks gestation on procedure time and dilation, complication rate, and side effects.We searched PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, POPLINE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register using search terms for second trimester, abortion, misoprostol, dilators and reviewed reference lists of published reports. Randomized controlled trials of cervical preparation for second trimester D&E using overnight osmotic dilators comparing adjunct misoprostol to placebo were included. Weighted mean and standard deviation (SD) and pooled binary outcomes were compared with two sample t-test or chi-square respectively.Among 84 articles identified, three met inclusion criteria of randomized controlled trials comparing adjunct misoprostol to placebo with overnight osmotic dilators prior to second trimester abortion with 457 total subjects at 16-24 weeks gestation (misoprostol n=228; placebo n=229). In the meta-analysis, misoprostol as compared to placebo did not significantly decrease mean procedure times (8.5 + 4.6 vs 9.6 + 5.8 minutes, p=0.78) or need for manual dilation (18% vs 28%, p=0.23). There was no difference in total complications (p=0.61), major complications (hemorrhage, uterine perforation, hospitalization, p=0.44), or cervical lacerations (p=0.87).Current limited evidence suggests that use of adjunctive misoprostol with osmotic dilators after 16 weeks does not affect procedure time or need for manual dilation. Further research is needed to determine if adjunctive misoprostol affects major complications and blood loss.Adjunctive misoprostol does not affect procedure time or need for manual dilation in mid to late second trimester abortion. Further research is needed to determine the effect of adjunctive misoprostol on major complications and blood loss.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.contraception.2019.09.005

    View details for PubMedID 31811840

  • Advances in the management of early pregnancy loss. Current opinion in obstetrics & gynecology Henkel, A., Shaw, K. A. 2018

    Abstract

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe recent advances in management of early pregnancy loss.RECENT FINDINGS: Addition of mifepristone to current protocols for medical management of miscarriage increases effectiveness of a single dose of misoprostol and significantly reduces subsequent aspiration procedures. Women with an incomplete evacuation after medical management may be treated expectantly with similar rates of complete expulsion compared with surgical management at 6 weeks. As cytogenetic analysis improves, analysis of products of conception can be performed whether collected after surgical or medical management and is an efficient strategy in starting a recurrent pregnancy loss work-up. For those seeking pregnancy after miscarriage, conception immediately following an early pregnancy loss is not associated with increased risk of subsequent miscarriage. However, recent studies suggest that the original intendedness of the pregnancy resulting in miscarriage does not predict future reproductive goals of the woman, so family planning should be discussed at the time of miscarriage.SUMMARY: Miscarriage is a common experience among reproductive-aged women and advances in medical management and modern-day aspiration techniques make the use of the sharp curette obsolete.

    View details for PubMedID 30299321

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