Bio

Bio


Dr. Vivian Shih received her Bachelor of Science with honors and Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Miami. In 2002, she completed her postgraduate medical training in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University and the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (Shirley Ryan Ability Lab). She is board certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R or Physiatry) and specializes in non­-surgical management of musculoskeletal disorders, arthritis, gait and balance disorders. She also performs electrodiagnostic testing (EMG/NCS), ultrasound guided joint/soft tissue injections, and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. Dr. Shih previously practiced in the New Haven area from 2005 to 2018. She was an Attending Physician at Yale-New Haven Hospital and on faculty at the Yale School of Medicine. Prior to that, she had been practicing at Northwestern University Medical Center and the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. She has published in the Arthritis and Rheumatism journal, Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (AAPM&R) online review, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation journal, and Koopman's Arthritis and Allied Health textbook. She is a member of the AAPM&R, Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP), and the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM). At AAPM&R, Dr. Shih is the principle author of the focused online reviews for joint and connective tissue disorders.

Clinical Focus


  • Physical Medicine and Rehab
  • Musculoskeletal Regenerative Medicine
  • Ultrasound guided injections
  • EMG/NCS

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehab, Physical Medicine and Rehab (2003)
  • Residency: McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University (2002) IL
  • Medical Education: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine/Jackson Memorial Hospital (1998) FL

Research & Scholarship

Projects


  • Focused Review Course: Joint & Connective Tissue Disorders, American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (11/2019 - 11/29/2022)

    Online review course for the AAPM&R. Principal author and speaker (recorded). Available November 2019 - present

    Location

    Chicago, Il

Publications

All Publications


  • 2007 SAE-P: Industrial medicine and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION Phelan, A. H., Akuthota, V., Kelly, B. M., Nelson, V. S., Shih, V. C. 2007; 88 (3): S40?S44
  • Racial differences in activities of daily living limitation onset in older adults with arthritis: A national cohort study ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION Shih, V. C., Song, J., Chang, R. W., Dunlop, D. A. 2005; 86 (8): 1521?26

    Abstract

    To investigate factors that predict the onset of limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) in adults 65 years old or older who have arthritis, in order to develop public health programs for minorities (African and Hispanic Americans) and white Americans.Longitudinal cohort study.National probability sample.Older adults with arthritis (N=3541) who participated in the 1998 and 2000 Health and Retirement Study interviews and who had no baseline ADL limitations.Not applicable.Onset of ADL limitations was identified from reports of 1 or more ADL task limitations at 2-year follow-up.Onset is most frequent among African Americans (24.4%), followed by Hispanics (22.2%), and whites (16.9%). Race specific multivariate analysis showed that the strongest risk factor predicting onset of limitations across all racial and ethnic groups is physical limitations. Low household income was significant for older minorities but not for whites. Comorbid cardiovascular disease was a unique multivariate risk factor among African Americans.Physical limitation is a strong risk factor for ADL limitation onset that is shared by all racial and ethnic groups. Early identification and treatment of physical limitations may prevent the onset of ADL limitations and thus improve quality of life. Race specific public health interventions should be considered to reduce the development of ADL limitations among older adults with arthritis.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2005.02.009

    View details for Web of Science ID 000231077900003

    View details for PubMedID 16084802

  • Risk factors for functional decline in older adults with arthritis ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM Dunlop, D. D., Semanik, P., Song, J., Manheim, L. M., Shih, Chang, R. W. 2005; 52 (4): 1274?82

    Abstract

    Functional limitation is a major factor in medical costs. This study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of functional limitation among adults with arthritis and the frequency of functional decline over 2 years, and to investigate factors amenable to public health intervention that predict functional decline.Longitudinal data (1998-2000) from a cohort of 5,715 adults ages 65 years or older with arthritis from a national probability sample were analyzed. Function was defined based on ability to perform basic activities of daily living (ADL) tasks and instrumental ADL. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) from a multiple logistic regression model were used to estimate the associations between functional decline and comorbid conditions, health behaviors, and economic factors.Overall, 19.7% of this cohort had functional limitation at baseline, including 12.9% with ADL limitations. Over the subsequent 2 years, function declined in 13.6% of those at risk. Functional decline was most frequent among women (15.0%) and minorities (18.0% Hispanics, 18.7% African Americans) with arthritis. Lack of regular vigorous physical activity, the most prevalent risk factor (64%), almost doubled the odds of functional decline (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.5-2.4) after controlling for all risk factors. It was found that if all subjects engaged in regular vigorous physical activity, the expected functional decline could be reduced as much as 32%. Other significant predictors included older age, cognitive impairment, depressive symptoms, diabetes, physical limitations, no alcohol use, stroke, and vision impairment.Lack of regular vigorous physical activity is a potentially modifiable risk factor that could substantially reduce functional decline and associated health care costs. Prevention/intervention programs should include regular vigorous physical activity, weight maintenance, and medical intervention for health needs. (c) 2005, American College of Rheumatology.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/art.20968

    View details for Web of Science ID 000228688200034

    View details for PubMedID 15818691

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC1199524

  • Rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders. 3. Total hip arthroplasty rehabilitation ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION Bitar, A. A., Kaplan, R. J., Stitik, T. P., Shih, V. C., Vo, A. N., Kamen, L. B. 2005; 86 (3): S56?S60

    Abstract

    This self-directed learning module highlights a clinical vignette of a female patient who had a total hip arthroplasty. The module addresses the medical management and rehabilitation interventions necessary to direct the postacute care needs of this patient. It is part of the study guide on rehabilitation of the joint replacement patient in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This chapter emphasizes planning for discharge from the acute care hospital, postacute care medical complications, and rehabilitation program elements germane to the patient with hip joint replacement.To summarize the postacute care planning, medical complications, and rehabilitation needs of the patient with hip joint replacement.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2004.12.015

    View details for Web of Science ID 000227613500009

    View details for PubMedID 15761802

  • Rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders. 5. Lumbar spinal stenosis ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION Vo, A. N., Kamen, L. B., Shih, V. C., Bitar, A. A., Stitik, T. P., Kaplan, R. J. 2005; 86 (3): S69?S76

    Abstract

    This self-directed learning module highlights the pathoanatomy and pathogenesis of lumbar spinal stenosis. The areas covered include assessment and therapeutic options in the rehabilitation of patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. It is part of the study guide on rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation.(a) To summarize the evaluation and management of lumbar spinal stenosis and (b) to review the pathoanatomy and pathogenesis of lumbar degenerative spinal stenosis.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2004.12.012

    View details for Web of Science ID 000227613500011

    View details for PubMedID 15761804

  • Rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders. 2. Osteoarthritis assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION Stitik, T. P., Kaplan, R. J., Kamen, L. B., Vo, A. N., Bitar, A. A., Shih, V. C. 2005; 86 (3): S48?S55

    Abstract

    This self-directed learning module discusses a patient with knee osteoarthritis and addresses the clinical presentation, assessment, medical management, rehabilitation approaches, and surgical options. It is part of the chapter on osteoarthritis in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This chapter emphasizes the differential diagnosis, clinical diagnostic considerations, current pharmacology, orthotics, exercise interventions, and surgical procedure options for a patient with knee osteoarthritis.To summarize diagnostic considerations and management of knee osteoarthritis.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2004.12.010

    View details for Web of Science ID 000227613500008

    View details for PubMedID 15761801

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