School of Medicine


Showing 601-683 of 683 Results

  • Joyce Teng, MD, PhD

    Joyce Teng, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Dermatology

    Bio Joyce Teng, MD, PhD is a professor in dermatology at Stanford University. She is affiliated with multiple hospitals in the area, including Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH) at Stanford and Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC). She received her medical degree from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 12 years. She is one of the 5 pediatric dermatologists practicing at LPCH and one of 72 at SHC who specialize in Dermatology. She sees patients with rare genetic disorders, birthmarks, vascular anomalies and a variety of inflammatory skin diseases. She is also an experienced pediatric dermatological surgeon. Her research interests are drug discovery and novel therapy for skin disorders.

  • Mary Frances Nunez Teruel

    Mary Frances Nunez Teruel

    Assistant Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Teruel Lab uses a combination of engineering and biological approaches including high-throughput screening of RNAi and DNA construct libraries, CRISPR libraries, targeted mass spectrometry, live-cell fluorescence microscopy, and bioinformatics to investigate the systems biology of cell differentiation and tissue renegeneration, with a particular focus on uncovering the molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance, diabetes, and obesity.

  • Avnesh Thakor

    Avnesh Thakor

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Over the past decade there has been tremendous advances in the field of Interventional Oncology with the clinical utilization of multiple new innovative locoregional therapies (i.e. chemoembolization, percutaneous ablation). Looking forward, our ability to superselectively deliver new therapies such as nanoparticles, stem cells and gene therapy will open new pathways for Interventional Radiology into the emerging field of Regenerative Medicine.

  • Suzanne Tharin

    Suzanne Tharin

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The long-term goal of my research is the repair of damaged corticospinal circuitry. Therapeutic regeneration strategies will be informed by an understanding both of corticospinal motor neuron (CSMN) development and of events occurring in CSMN in the setting of spinal cord injury. MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of ?suites? of genes. The work in my lab seeks to identify microRNA controls over CSMN development and over the CSMN response to spinal cord injury.

  • Margo Thienemann

    Margo Thienemann

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Disorder

  • Robert Tibshirani

    Robert Tibshirani

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research is in applied statistics and biostatistics. I specialize in computer-intensive methods for regression and classification, bootstrap, cross-validation and statistical inference, and signal and image analysis for medical diagnosis.

  • Seda Tierney

    Seda Tierney

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Assessment of vascular health s in children by non-invasive modalities

    Echocardiography and outcomes in congenital heart disease

  • Alice Ting

    Alice Ting

    Professor of Genetics, of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We develop chemogenetic and optogenetic technologies for probing and manipulating protein networks, cellular RNA, and the function of mitochondria and the mammalian brain. Our technologies draw from enzyme engineering, directed evolution, chemical biology, organic synthesis, high-resolution microscopy, genetics, and computational analysis.

  • Katherine Travis

    Katherine Travis

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics)

    Bio Dr. Katherine Travis is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University. Dr. Travis obtained her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of California San Diego. Dr. Travis came to Stanford as a postdoctoral fellow to obtain training in clinical neuroscience and translational approaches to intervention. As part of her training, she was awarded a K99/R00 Pathway to Independence grant from the National Institutes of Health.

    Her research uses human neuroimaging and behavioral measures to examine the neural bases of early language learning in infants and young children. The goal of her research is to develop therapies and interventions to help promote language learning outcomes in children at-risk for learning disabilities. Currently, she directs an NIH-funded clinical trial that will use diffusion MRI to assess whether there are changes in brain structure following a language intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for preterm infants.

  • Jennifer Tremmel

    Jennifer Tremmel

    Susan P. and Riley P. Bechtel Medical Director and Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Tremmel studies sex differences in cardiovascular disease. Current research projects include evaluating sex differences in coronary pathophysiology, young patients presenting with myocardial infarction, the impact of stress on anginal symptoms, chronic total coronary occlusions, and vascular access site complications.

  • Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our primary interests are in the molecular underpinnings of vascular disease as well as assessing disease risk. In addition to targeted investigation of specific signaling molecules, we utilize global genomic analysis to identify gene expression networks and regulatory units. We are particularly interested in the role of microRNAs in gene expression pathways associated with disease.

  • Chi-Ho Ban Tsui

    Chi-Ho Ban Tsui

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult-MSD) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Tsui completed his medical training at Dalhousie University, Halifax, in 1995 after obtaining his Masters of Science in Pharmacy in 1991. These degrees followed a Diploma in Engineering and Bachelors of Science in both Mathematics and Pharmacy. Dr. Tsui completed his anesthesia residency training at the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton in 2000, and he received further experience in pediatric anesthesia at British Columbia Children's Hospital in Vancouver. After 16 years of practice at the University of Alberta Hospital and Stollery Children?s Hospital, Dr. Tsui was recruited to Stanford University.

    Currently, Dr. Tsui is a Medical Center Line (MCL) Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University. In his position as an adult and pediatric anesthesiologist at the Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital, he specializes in regional anesthesia techniques.

    Dr. Tsui is an avid and internationally recognized researcher in many areas of regional anesthesia. During his residency, Dr. Tsui developed an interest in improving the accuracy of epidural catheter placement and was issued a U.S. patent in relation to his research. Dr. Tsui has expanded his research into the use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia, with particular relevance to peripheral nerve block performance. Dr. Tsui is also responsible for development of the E-Catheter catheter-over-needle kit for use during peripheral nerve blocks. The primary objective of his research is to transform regional anesthesia from an ?art? into a reliable and reproducible ?science? by further exploring the basic scientific and clinical aspects of electrophysiological signal monitoring and integrating this with the latest advances in ultrasound.

    Dr. Tsui has received the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR) Clinical Scholar award and has previously received research awards and grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Canadian Anesthesiologists? Society, AHFMR, and University of Alberta. In 2015, a prestigious award, the CAS Research Recognition Award, was presented by the Canadian Anesthesiologists? Society to Dr. Tsui "in recognition of significant research contributions to regional anesthesia, acute pain management and pediatric anesthesia in Canada and around the world".

  • Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Complex behavioral and neuropsychiatric phenotypes often have a strong genetic component. This genetic component is often extremely complex and difficult to dissect. The current revolution in genome technology means that we can avail ourselves to tools that make it possible for the first time to begin understanding the complex genetic and epigenetic interactions at the basis of the human mind.

  • PJ Utz

    PJ Utz

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The long-term research goal of Utz laboratory is (1) to develop a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases by exploring signaling pathways that are activated during apoptosis; and (2) to better understand the complicated process of programmed cell death.

  • Tulio Valdez

    Tulio Valdez

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology (Pediatric) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Bio Dr. Tulio A Valdez is a surgeon scientist born and raised in Colombia with a subspecialty interest in Pediatric Otolaryngology. He attended medical school at Universidad Javeriana in Bogota Colombia before undertaking his residency in Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery in Boston. He completed his Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship at Texas Children?s Hospital (2007), Houston and obtained his Master?s in Clinical and Translational Research at the University of Connecticut.

    Clinically, Dr. Valdez has an interest in airway surgery and swallowing disorders. He has a special interest in the management of sinus disease in cystic fibrosis. Dr. Valdez has co-authored one textbook and numerous book chapters and scientific manuscripts. Dr. Valdez continues his clinical research in these areas, particularly with a focus on aerodigestive disorders.

    Scientifically, Dr. Valdez has developed various imaging methods to diagnose otitis media and cholesteatoma a middle ear condition that can lead to hearing loss. He was part of the Laser Biomedical Research Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research includes novel imaging modalities to better diagnose ear infections one of the most common pediatric problems. His research has now expanded to include better intraoperative imaging modalities in pediatric patients to improve surgical outcomes without the need for radiation exposure. 

    Dr. Valdez believes in the multi-disciplinary collaborations to tackle medical problems and has co-invented various medical devices and surgical simulation models.

  • Matt van de Rijn

    Matt van de Rijn

    Sabine Kohler, MD, Professor in Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on molecular analysis of human soft tissue tumors (sarcomas) with an emphasis on leiomyosarcoma and desmoid tumors. In addition we study the role of macrophages in range of malignant tumors.

  • Keith Van Haren, MD

    Keith Van Haren, MD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research group is dedicated to innovating care for children with degenerative brain disorders. We are particularly focused on genetic and autoimmune disorders that cause damage to the myelin (the fatty insulation around the nerves) of the brain and spinal cord. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (genetic) and multiple sclerosis (autoimmune) are the prototypical examples of degenerative disorders of myelin and are the two disorders we study most intensively.

  • Krisa Van Meurs

    Krisa Van Meurs

    Rosemarie Hess Professor in Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, hypoxic respiratory failure, inhaled nitric oxide therapy, ECMO, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, neonatal clinical trials, and the use of aEEG and NIRS to detect brain injury.

  • Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group is focused on developing new fast and quantitative MRI techniques.

  • Anne Villeneuve

    Anne Villeneuve

    Professor of Developmental Biology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanisms underlying homologous chromosome pairing, DNA recombination and chromosome remodeling during meiosis, using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an experimental system. High-resolution 3-D imaging of dynamic reorganization of chromosome architecture. Role of protease inhibitors in regulating sperm activation.

  • Erin A. Vogel

    Erin A. Vogel

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, SCRDP/ Heart Disease Prevention

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Adolescent e-cigarette use, smoking in the LGBTQ+ community, social media and well-being, multiple health risk behaviors, digital interventions for substance use

  • David Vu

    David Vu

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Bio Dr. Vu is a pediatric infectious diseases specialist who is researching human responses to dengue virus and malaria infections. He performed his undergraduate studies at the University of California, San Diego, and obtained his medical doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He trained in general pediatrics at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, and in pediatric infectious diseases at Emory University School of Medicine. His present studies on pediatric dengue and malaria co-infection are supported by an NIAID Career Development Award (K23 AI127909) and a Instructor K Award Support Program Award from the Maternal & Child Health Research Institute and Department of Pediatrics.

  • Soichi Wakatsuki

    Soichi Wakatsuki

    Professor of Photon Science and of Structural Biology

    Bio Soichi Wakatsuki is a Professor of Photon Science at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory where he recently initiated the Biociences Division, and Professor of Structural Biology, Stanford School of Medicine. He received his B.S and M.S. degrees in Chemical Engineering from University of Tokyo, and his Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from Stanford University in 1991. After postdoctoral studies on time-resolved x-ray crystallography of enzyme reactions in Oxford (1990 to 1994), he moved to Grenoble, France in 1994 to work at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) where he led Joint Structural Biology Group to develop high-brilliance x-ray crystallography beamlines and instruments, as well as several structural biology projects on protein transport. In 2000, Soichi moved back to Japan to start a new Structural Biology Research Center at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan, and later served as Director of Photon Factory (national synchrotron radiation facility) from 2006 to 2012. There he further developed x-ray beamlines and a large scale protein crystallization system, led initiatives to start three national projects on structural proteomics. Fascinated by new research opportunities in integrative bioimaging at Stanford and the world?s first hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) at SLAC, Soichi returned to Stanford in 2013. Soichi?s research interests include structural biology of post-translational modification and vesicle transport, structural biology of polyubiquitin recognition, synchrotron radiation and XFEL instrumentation, protein crystallography and small angle X-ray scattering, integrative multi-scale bioimaging.

  • Dennis Wall

    Dennis Wall

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Systems Medicine), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Systems biology for design of clinical solutions that detect and treat disease

  • Brian A. Wandell

    Brian A. Wandell

    Isaac and Madeline Stein Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering, of Ophthalmology and at the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Models and measures of the human visual system. The brain pathways essential for reading development. Diffusion tensor imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and computational modeling of visual perception and brain processes.

  • C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and of Medicine (PCOR) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research)

    Bio Dr. Wang is the Director of Center for Policy, Outcomes and Prevention. Prior to coming to Stanford in 2011, he was a faculty member at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health. His other professional experiences include working as a management consultant with McKinsey and Company and serving as the project manager for Taiwan's National Health Insurance Reform Task-force. His current interests include: 1) developing tools for assessing and improving the value of healthcare; 2) facilitating the use of mobile technology in improving quality of care; 3) supporting competency-based medical education curriculum, and 4) engaging in healthcare reform.

  • Kevin Wang, MD, PhD

    Kevin Wang, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Wang lab takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying fundamental mechanisms controlling gene expression in mammalian cells, and how epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, chromatin modifications, and RNA influence chromatin dynamics to affect gene regulation.

  • Marie Wang

    Marie Wang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Evaluation and management of the febrile young infant and infections in hospitalized children (eg, UTIs, CNS infections, pneumonia); promotion of appropriate antibiotic use; implementation of clinical pathways.

  • Nancy  Wang

    Nancy Wang

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hospital Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Disparities in Emergency Medical Services for children.
    - Efficacy of novel interventions for pediatric access to care.
    - Teaching and supporting community-initiated interventions and programs internationally.

  • Paul  J. Wang, MD

    Paul J. Wang, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Wang's research centers on the development of innovative approaches to the treatment of arrhythmias, including more effective catheter ablation techniques, more reliable implantable devices, and less invasive treatments. Dr. Wang's clinical research interests include atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, syncope, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Dr. Wang has active collaborations with Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering Departments at Stanford.

  • Shan X. Wang

    Shan X. Wang

    Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Wang is the Director of Stanford Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology, and the Co-PI of the Stanford Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. His research interests lie in nanotechnology and information storage, including magnetic/spintronic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cell sorting, magnetic nanoparticles, nano-patterning, spin electronic materials and sensors, as well as magnetic integrated inductors and transformers.

  • Wang,Taia

    Wang,Taia

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies in our lab are aimed at defining mechanisms in human immunity and disease. We are particularly interested the hypothesis that IgG repertoire diversity is a central driver of heterogeneity in human immune functioning and susceptibility to infectious diseases. Our work is defining how diversity that exists in the IgG Fc domain repertoire among people, which we define by serum IgG subclass and Fc glycoform distributions, impacts immune processes such as vaccine responses and susceptibility to antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue disease (Wang TT, Cell. 2015 and Wang TT, Science. 2017). IgG subclass and Fc glycoform distributions are key regulators of immunity because these determine the structure of Fc domains within immune complexes that form during vaccination or infection. Fc structure, in turn, determines the affinity of immune complexes for various Fc receptors on effector cells. Thus, we are studying how the Fc domain repertoire of an individual impacts the quality of effector cell responses that can be recruited during immune activation and how selectivity of effector responses contributes to immunity and disease.

    We are particularly interested in training students and postdocs who will go on to be independent investigators in mechanistic studies relevant to human disease.


    Current clinical studies:
    Recruiting:

    An Open Label Study of IgG Fc Glycan Composition in Human Immunity
    Principal Investigator: Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
    NCT01967238

  • Weinacht,Katja Gabriele

    Weinacht,Katja Gabriele

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
    DiGeorge Syndrome
    Genetic Immune Diseases
    Immune Dysregulation

  • Dana Weintraub

    Dana Weintraub

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests include: 1) Childhood obesity, community-based interventions to increase physical activity 2) Impact of medical-legal collaboration on child and family health.

  • Irving Weissman

    Irving Weissman

    Director, Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research, Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Stem cell and cancer stem cell biology; development of T and B lymphocytes; cell-surface receptors for oncornaviruses in leukemia. Hematopoietic stem cells; Lymphocyte homing, lymphoma invasiveness and metastasis.

  • Marius Wernig

    Marius Wernig

    Professor of Pathology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Epigenetic Reprogramming, Direct conversion of fibroblasts into neurons, Pluripotent Stem Cells, Neural Differentiation: implications in development and regenerative medicine

  • Matthew Wheeler

    Matthew Wheeler

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Translational research in rare and undiagnosed diseases. Basic and clinical research in cardiomyopathy genetics, mechanisms, screening, and treatment. Investigating novel agents for treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and new mechanisms in heart failure. Cardiovascular screening and genetics in competitive athletes, disease gene discovery in cardiomyopathy and rare disease. Informatics approaches to rare disease and multiomics. Molecular transducers of physical activity bioinformatics.

  • Darrell Wilson

    Darrell Wilson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests cover a number of areas in Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes. I am PI of the Stanford Center for the NIH-funded Type-1 Diabetes TrialNet group. TrialNet conducts clinical trials directed at preventing or delaying the onset of Type 1 diabetes. I am an investigator in DirecNet, another NIH-funded study group, which is devoted to evaluating glucose sensors and the role of technology on the management of diabetes.

  • Helen Wilson

    Helen Wilson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Wilson is a licensed clinical psychologist with expertise on the effects of trauma across the lifespan. She provides clinical services for children, adolescents, adults, and families affected by trauma and other forms of anxiety and stress. Dr. Wilson also leads an active research program focused on relationships between childhood trauma and health risk behavior in adolescence and adulthood. She is the Principal Investigator of GIRLTALK: We Talk, a longitudinal study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) that examines links from childhood violence exposure to dating violence and sexual risk in young women from low-income communities in Chicago. Dr. Wilson has authored or co-authored thirty journal articles and book chapters related to these topics, and she regularly presents her work at local and national conferences. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

  • Jeffrey J. Wine

    Jeffrey J. Wine

    Benjamin Scott Crocker Professor of Human Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goal is to understand how a defective ion channel leads to the human genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Studies of ion channels and ion transport involved in gland fluid transport. Methods include SSCP mutation detection and DNA sequencing, protein analysis, patch-clamp recording, ion-selective microelectrodes, electrophysiological analyses of transmembrane ion flows, isotopic metho

  • Terry Winograd

    Terry Winograd

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    Bio Professor Winograd's focus is on human-computer interaction design and the design of technologies for development. He directs the teaching programs and HCI research in the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group, which recently celebrated it's 20th anniversary. He is also a founding faculty member of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the "d.school") and on the faculty of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL)

    Winograd was a founding member and past president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He is on a number of journal editorial boards, including Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, and Informatica. He has advised a number of companies started by his students, including Google. In 2011 he received the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Research Award.

  • Paul H. Wise, MD, MPH

    Paul H. Wise, MD, MPH

    Richard E. Behrman Professor in Child Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests He is a health policy and outcomes researcher whose work has focused on children's health; health-outcomes disparities by race, ethnicity and socioeconomic status; the interaction of genetics and the environment as these factors influence child and maternal health; and the impact of medical technology on disparities in health outcomes.

  • Marlene Helen Kennedy Wolfe

    Marlene Helen Kennedy Wolfe

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Bio Marlene is a Postdoctoral Scholar with the Woods Institute for the Environment. Her research uses environmental engineering, microbiology, and epidemiology to address complex issues in WASH and child health. She has 10 years of experience working on WASH topics in low and middle income countries and emergencies, especially in East Africa. During her PhD, she focused on the development of new approaches to assess exposure to emerging infectious challenges and interventions to interrupt transmission with a focus on handwashing. At Stanford, Marlene focuses on the relationship between WASH infrastructure in communities and institutions and disease risk in the local environment. Marlene did her doctoral training in Environmental Health at Tufts University, and holds an MSc in Epidemiology from the the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a BA in Human Biology from Stanford University.

  • Wing Hung Wong

    Wing Hung Wong

    Stephen R. Pierce Family Goldman Sachs Professor in Science and Human Health and Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current interest centers on the application of statistics to biology and medicine. We are particularly interested in questions concerning gene regulation, genome interpretation and their applications to precision medicine.

  • Mollie Woodworth

    Mollie Woodworth

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Many types of blindness result from the neurons of the retina no longer being able to communicate with the brain due to injury or disease. In mammals, the adult retina cannot make new retinal ganglion cells (the neurons that connect the retina with the brain) to replace those that are lost. In my work, I aim to learn about normal development of retinal ganglion cells and, further, to regenerate new retinal ganglion cells if they are lost in adulthood.

  • Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My translational research focuses on using autologous stem cells to recreate a patient?s ocular tissues for potential transplantation. We are generating tissue from induced pluripotent stem cells to treat limbal stem cell deficiency in patients who are bilaterally blind. By applying my background in molecular and cellular biology, stem cell biology, oculoplastic surgery, I hope to make regenerative medicine a reality for those suffering from orbital and ocular disease.

  • Chien Ting Wu

    Chien Ting Wu

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Microbiology and Immunology

    Bio I started conducting research as a second-year student in college. I entered a biochemical lab to perform research and had my own project. My topic was Alzheimer's disease, and I focused on the relationship between aggregated amyloid-beta and reactive oxygen species levels in cells. I am very grateful for this particular research experience because it allowed me to realize that I am particularly interested in studying disease-associated proteins on a molecular level. Thus, these early research experiences have been invaluable in shaping my scientific interests and personality.

    I decided to pursue my graduate training straight out of college by obtaining my master?s degree. I then decided to join the Chen, I-T. Lab for my graduate research training, where I discovered that a novel recombinant protein, LZ8 cloned from Ganoderma, can inhibit the duplication of cancer cells in vitro and decrease the growth rate of tumors in vivo through regulating the p53/MDM2/mTOR signaling pathway. My findings were published in the journal Carcinogenesis. This was my first first-author paper. During this time, I learned how to become an independent scientist.

    After my master?s degree, I spent three years completing my military service as a research assistant in Academia Sinica. I worked under the supervision of Prof. Tang Tang. My research focused on the molecular mechanism of centriole duplication. In my research, I found that CEP120, a ciliopathy protein, is required to promote centriole elongation. Overexpression of CEP120 can induce overly long centrioles. This work was published in the Journal of Cell Biology. This was my second first-author paper. Because of these valuable lab experiences, I began to be fascinated by the centriole and cilium field.

    Afterwards, to better understand centriole- and cilia-related human hereditary diseases, I worked as a molecular diagnostician in a molecular diagnosis lab at Oregon Health Science University. I used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify gene mutations from ciliopathy patients. During this period, I learned how to run a complete molecular diagnosis, draw blood for running NGS, analyzing patient data, preparing patient reports and designing a novel disease panel to run NGS. This experience provided me with a new perspective and connected the things that I learned in the centriole and cilia field, from biochemistry to molecular biology to clinical diagnosis. Most importantly, this experience allowed me to realize that so many people suffer from ciliopathy disease. As a researcher, I hope to continue my research on the cilium field to help develop better clinical treatments for these patients.

    For this reason, I decided to join the Tang Tang Lab in Academia Sinica for my PhD training. The Tang Lab has a longstanding interest in understanding the mechanisms of centriole duplication and is at the forefront of research in the primary cilium field. In this period, I found that Myosin-Va, a motor protein, is required for preciliary vesicle trafficking during the early stage of ciliogenesis. This research was published in Nature Cell Biology.
    Thus, my experiences have allowed me to develop my scientific interests and to realize that I would one day like to run my own laboratory and research program focusing on cilium-related diseases.

  • Hsi-Yang Wu

    Hsi-Yang Wu

    Associate Professor of Urology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in how the brain matures to control the bladder and external sphincter to achieve urinary continence. Using functional MRI of the brain, we are investigating if certain patterns of activity will predict which children will respond to therapy for incontinence.

  • Joseph  C. Wu

    Joseph C. Wu

    Director, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Simon H. Stertzer, MD, Professor and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Drug discovery, drug screening, and disease modeling using biobank of cardiac iPSC lines.

  • Joy Wu

    Joy Wu

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory focuses on the pathways that regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast and adipocyte lineages. We are also studying the role of osteoblasts in the hematopoietic and cancer niches in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  • Sean M. Wu

    Sean M. Wu

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab seeks to identify mechanisms regulating cardiac lineage commitment during embryonic development and the biology of cardiac progenitor cells in development and disease. We believe that by understanding the transcriptional and epigenetic basis of cardiomyocyte growth and differentiation, we can identify the most effective ways to repair diseased adult hearts. We employ mouse and human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as rodents as our in vivo models for investigation.

  • Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My projects focus on clinical research in newborns with, or at risk, for brain injury. I use EEG in at-risk neonates to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of risk factors that may lead to worse outcomes. I am particularly interested in neonatal seizures and how they may exacerbate perinatal brain injury with a goal to identify treatments that might protect the vulnerable brain. I am also interested in EEG in other pediatric populations, as well as medical ethics and global health.

  • Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    D. H. Chen Professor II

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Use of genetic and molecular tools to dissect immune and inflammatory pathways in Alzheimer's and neurodegeneration.

  • Fan Yang

    Fan Yang

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research seeks to understand how microenvironmental cues regulate stem cell fate, and to develop novel biomaterials and stem cell-based therapeutics for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Our work spans from fundamental science, technology development, to translational research.We are particularly interested in developing better therapies for treating musculoskeletal diseases, cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

  • Fan Yang

    Fan Yang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    Bio Fan Yang has a broad background in Computational Biology, Genomics, Oncology, Immunology, and their intersections. She did her Ph.D. at the University of Toronto and participated in several inspiring and cutting-edge projects focusing on assessing the functionality and immunogenicity of human genomic variants both experimentally and computationally. She joined the Boyd lab at Stanford for her postdoctoral work to study the B cell and T cell repertoires in human infectious diseases and vaccine responses.

  • Samuel Yang, MD, FACEP

    Samuel Yang, MD, FACEP

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Yang's research is focused on bridging the translational gap at the interface of molecular biology, genome science, engineering, and acute care medicine. The investigative interest of the Yang lab falls within the general theme of developing integrative systems-level approaches for precision diagnostics, as well as data driven knowledge discoveries, to improve the health outcome and our understanding of complex critical illnesses. Using sepsis as the disease model with complex host-pathogen dynamics, the goals of the Yang lab are divided into 2 areas:

    1) Developing high-content, near-patient, diagnostic system for rapid broad pathogen detection and characterization.

    2) Integrating multi-omics molecular and phenotypic data layers with novel computational approaches into AI-assisted diagnostics and predictive analytics for sepsis.

  • Yanmin Yang

    Yanmin Yang

    Associate Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Elucidate biological functions of cytoskeletal associated proteins in neurons. Define the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in null mice.

  • Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Yang’ lab's research interests are in the areas of bio-inspired biomaterials, medical devices, and 3D printing approaches for re-creating a suitable microenvironment for cell growth and tissue regeneration for musculoskeletal disease diagnosis and treatment, including multiple tissue healing such as rotator cuff injury, orthopedic diseases such as osteoporosis and osteonecrosis, and orthopedic traumas such as massive bone and muscle injuries.

  • Mahboubeh Yazdanifar

    Mahboubeh Yazdanifar

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio Bachelor's degree in Animal Biology, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran (2007)
    Master's degree in Medical Immunology, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran (2010)
    Ph.D. in Biology-Cancer Immunology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, NC, USA (2019)
    Postdoctoral Scholar at Stanford University (2019-present)

  • Jiangbin Ye

    Jiangbin Ye

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One hallmark of cancer is that malignant cells modulate metabolic pathways to promote cancer progression. My professional interest is to investigate the causes and consequences of the abnormal metabolic phenotypes of cancer cells in response to microenvironmental stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, with the prospect that therapeutic approaches might be developed to target these metabolic pathways to improve cancer treatment.

  • Jason Yeatman

    Jason Yeatman

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics) and of Education

    Bio Dr. Jason Yeatman is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University. Dr. Yeatman completed his PhD in Psychology at Stanford where he studied the neurobiology of literacy and developed new brain imaging methods for studying the relationship between brain plasticity and learning. After finishing his PhD, he took a faculty position at the University of Washington?s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences before returning to Stanford.

    As the director of the Brain Development and Education Lab, the overarching goal of his research is to understand the mechanisms that underlie the process of learning to read, how these mechanisms differ in children with dyslexia, and to design literacy intervention programs that are effective across the wide spectrum of learning differences. His lab employs a collection of structural and functional neuroimaging measurements to study how a child?s experience with reading instruction shapes the development of brain circuits that are specialized for this unique cognitive function.

  • Ellen Yeh

    Ellen Yeh

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The chemistry and biology of the unusual plastid organelle, the apicoplast, in malaria parasites

  • James L. Zehnder, M.D.

    James L. Zehnder, M.D.

    Professor of Pathology (Research) and of Medicine (Hematology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory focuses on translational research in 2 main areas - genomic approaches to diagnosis and minimal residual disease testing for patients with cancer, and molecular basis of disorders of thrombosis and hemostasis. My clinical focus is in molecular pathology, diagnosis and treatment of disorders of hemostasis and thrombosis and general hematology.

  • Jamie Zeitzer

    Jamie Zeitzer

    Associate Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Zeitzer is a circadian physiologist specializing in the understanding of the impact of light on circadian rhythms and other aspects of non-image forming light perception.
    He examines the manner in which humans respond to light and ways to manipulate this responsiveness, with direct application to jet lag, shift work, and altered sleep timing in teens. Dr. Zeitzer has also pioneered the use of actigraphy in the determination of epiphenomenal markers of psychiatric disorders.

  • J. Bradley Zuchero

    J. Bradley Zuchero

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Glia are a frontier of neuroscience, and overwhelming evidence from the last decade shows that they are essential regulators of all aspects of the nervous system. The Zuchero Lab aims to uncover how glial cells regulate neural development and how their dysfunction contributes to diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and in injuries like stroke.

    Although glia represent more than half of the cells in the human brain, fundamental questions remain to be answered. How do glia develop their highly specialized morphologies and interact with neurons to powerfully control form and function of the nervous system? How is this disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases and after injury? By bringing cutting-edge cell biology techniques to the study of glia, we aim to uncover how glia help sculpt and regulate the nervous system and test their potential as novel, untapped therapeutic targets for disease and injury.

    We are particularly interested in myelin, the insulating sheath around neuronal axons that is lost in diseases like MS. How do oligodendrocytes- the glial cell that produces myelin in the central nervous system- form and remodel myelin, and why do they fail to regenerate myelin in disease? Our current projects aim to use cell biology and neuroscience approaches to answer these fundamental questions. Ultimately we hope our work will lead to much-needed therapies to promote remyelination in patients.

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