School of Medicine


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  • Joseph  C. Wu

    Joseph C. Wu

    Director, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Simon H. Stertzer, MD, Professor and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Drug discovery, drug screening, and disease modeling using biobank of cardiac iPSC lines.

  • Joy Wu

    Joy Wu

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory focuses on the pathways that regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast and adipocyte lineages. We are also studying the role of osteoblasts in the hematopoietic and cancer niches in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  • Sean M. Wu

    Sean M. Wu

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab seeks to identify mechanisms regulating cardiac lineage commitment during embryonic development and the biology of cardiac progenitor cells in development and disease. We believe that by understanding the transcriptional and epigenetic basis of cardiomyocyte growth and differentiation, we can identify the most effective ways to repair diseased adult hearts. We employ mouse and human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as rodents as our in vivo models for investigation.

  • Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My projects focus on clinical research in newborns with, or at risk, for brain injury. I use EEG in at-risk neonates to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of risk factors that may lead to worse outcomes. I am particularly interested in neonatal seizures and how they may exacerbate perinatal brain injury with a goal to identify treatments that might protect the vulnerable brain. I am also interested in EEG in other pediatric populations, as well as medical ethics and global health.

  • Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    D. H. Chen Professor II

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Use of genetic and molecular tools to dissect immune and inflammatory pathways in Alzheimer's and neurodegeneration.

  • Fan Yang

    Fan Yang

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research seeks to understand how microenvironmental cues regulate stem cell fate, and to develop novel biomaterials and stem cell-based therapeutics for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Our work spans from fundamental science, technology development, to translational research.We are particularly interested in developing better therapies for treating musculoskeletal diseases, cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

  • Fan Yang

    Fan Yang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    Bio Fan Yang has a broad background in Computational Biology, Genomics, Oncology, Immunology, and their intersections. She did her Ph.D. at the University of Toronto and participated in several inspiring and cutting-edge projects focusing on assessing the functionality and immunogenicity of human genomic variants both experimentally and computationally. She joined the Boyd lab at Stanford for her postdoctoral work to study the B cell and T cell repertoires in human infectious diseases and vaccine responses.

  • Samuel Yang, MD, FACEP

    Samuel Yang, MD, FACEP

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Yang's research is focused on bridging the translational gap at the interface of molecular biology, genome science, engineering, and acute care medicine. The investigative interest of the Yang lab falls within the general theme of developing integrative systems-level approaches for precision diagnostics, as well as data driven knowledge discoveries, to improve the health outcome and our understanding of complex critical illnesses. Using sepsis as the disease model with complex host-pathogen dynamics, the goals of the Yang lab are divided into 2 areas:

    1) Developing high-content, near-patient, diagnostic system for rapid broad pathogen detection and characterization.

    2) Integrating multi-omics molecular and phenotypic data layers with novel computational approaches into AI-assisted diagnostics and predictive analytics for sepsis.

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