School of Medicine


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  • Charles G. Prober, MD

    Charles G. Prober, MD

    Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education and Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interest is in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of infections in children. Much of this research has focused on viral infections, especially those caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). I have conducted a number of studies concerned with the epidemiology of HSV-2 infections in pregnant women, their partners, and neonates.

  • Judith Prochaska

    Judith Prochaska

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Prochaska's research expertise centers on technology-mediated health behavior change interventions including targets of tobacco, physical activity, and dietary change. Working with Alaska Native and Latino communities, people with serious mental illness, alcohol and drug problems, or heart disease, and jobseekers and the unhoused, Dr. Prochaska?s research combines stage-tailored interventions with pharmacotherapy and utilizes interactive expert system interventions and social media.

  • Jochen Profit

    Jochen Profit

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Funded by NIH R01 grants:

    1) Development and application of composite measure of NICU quality - Baby-MONITOR

    2) High reliability, safety culture and caregiver resilience as modifiers of care quality

    3) Modifiable racial/ethnic disparities in quality of care delivery

    4) Effectiveness of regionalized care delivery systems for preterm newborns

  • Stephanie Pun, MD

    Stephanie Pun, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Pun specializes in the treatment of complex hip disorders with surgical hip preservation options for children, adolescents, and adults. Her goal is to enhance hip function in active individuals and to prevent the early development of hip osteoarthritis.

  • Stanley Qi

    Stanley Qi

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Bio Dr. Lei Qi (Stanley) is Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering (School of Engineering), Department of Chemical and Systems Biology (School of Medicine), and a core faculty member in Stanford ChEM-H Institute. He is one pioneer in the CRISPR technology development for genome engineering. He has developed the CRISPRi/a technologies for purposes beyond gene editing: gene regulation using CRISPR interference (CRISPRi, gene repression) and CRISPR activation (CRISPRa, gene activation), CRISPR dynamic imaging of chromatin in living cells, and CRISPRi/a high-throughput single or combinatorial genetic screens. He is also active in the field of Synthetic Biology and has developed synthetic noncoding RNAs for controlling transcription and translation. He obtained his Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the University of California Berkeley/UCSF in 2012. He joined UCSF as faculty fellow between 2012 to 2014, and joined the faculty at Stanford University since 2014. His lab currently is applying genetic engineering to rational cell design for understanding genomics and cell therapy.

  • Thomas Quertermous, MD

    Thomas Quertermous, MD

    William G. Irwin Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Understanding genetic basis of cardiovascular function and disease.

  • Marlene Rabinovitch

    Marlene Rabinovitch

    Dwight and Vera Dunlevie Professor in Pediatric Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research program seeks to identify the cellular and molecular programs regulating vascular and lung development, through the use of cultured cells and tissues and mouse and rat models. We then determine how these programs are perturbed by genetic abnormalities or injurious processes associated with disease, focusing on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a fatal complication in children with heart defects, and a condition of unknown etiology primarily in young women.

  • Vasiliki Rahimzadeh

    Vasiliki Rahimzadeh

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biomedical Ethics

    Bio Vasiliki (Vaso) Rahimzadeh, PhD is an applied bioethics scholar with research interests at the intersection of precision medicine, data governance and public policy.

  • Shamma Shakila Rahman

    Shamma Shakila Rahman

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Human Gene Therapy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Immunological pathophysiology of Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome

  • Ram Rajagopal

    Ram Rajagopal

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Bio Ram Rajagopal is an Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University, where he directs the Stanford Sustainable Systems Lab (S3L), focused on large-scale monitoring, data analytics and stochastic control for infrastructure networks, in particular, power networks. His current research interests in power systems are in the integration of renewables, smart distribution systems, and demand-side data analytics.

    He holds a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and an M.A. in Statistics, both from the University of California Berkeley, Masters in Electrical and Computer Engineering from University of Texas, Austin and Bachelors in Electrical Engineering from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award, Powell Foundation Fellowship, Berkeley Regents Fellowship and the Makhoul Conjecture Challenge award. He holds more than 30 patents and several best paper awards from his work and has advised or founded various companies in the fields of sensor networks, power systems, and data analytics.

  • R J Ramamurthi

    R J Ramamurthi

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Prospective collection of pediatric regional block procedures and complications on to a national database

  • Anoop Rao

    Anoop Rao

    Clinical Instructor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Wearable senors, unobtrusive vital sign monitoring, natural language processing/text mining

  • Natalie L. Rasgon

    Natalie L. Rasgon

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Rasgon has been involved in longitudinal placebo-controlled neuroendocrine studies for nearly two decades, and she has been involved in neuroendocrine and brain imaging studies of estrogen effects on depressed menopausal women for the last eight years. It should be noted that in addition to her duties as a Professor of Psychiatry and Obstetrics & Gynecology, Dr. Rasgon is also the Director of the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program and of the Women's Wellness Program.

  • Lindsey Rasmussen

    Lindsey Rasmussen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests reside in the field of Neurocritical Care Medicine. My research focus has included inflammation following traumatic brain injury, outcome prediction after cardiac arrest, and neuro-monitoring in the pediatric intensive care setting. These interests are integrated clinically to focus on the merging of specialized neurologic monitoring and care with prognostic efforts in critically ill patients.

  • Kristy Red-Horse

    Kristy Red-Horse

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiovascular developmental biology

  • Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Reimer Lab interests

    A primary interest of our lab is to understand how nerve cells make and recycle neurotransmitters, the small molecules that they use to communicate with each other. In better defining these processes we hope to achieve our long-term goal of identifying novel sites for treatment of diseases such as epilepsy and Parkinson Disease. In our studies on neurotransmitter metabolism we have focused our efforts on transporters, a functional class of proteins that move neurotransmitters and other small molecules across membranes in cells. Transporters have many characteristics that make them excellent pharmacological targets, and not surprisingly some of the most effective treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders are directed at transporters. We are specifically focusing on two groups of transporters – vesicular neurotransmitter transporters that package neurotransmitters into vesicles for release, and glutamine transporters that shuttle glutamine, a precursor for two major neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA, to neurons from glia, the supporting cells that surround them. We are pursuing these goals through molecular and biochemical studies, and, in collaboration with the Huguenard and Prince labs, through physiological and biosensor based imaging studies to better understand how pharmacological targeting of these molecules will influence neurological disorders.

    A second interest of our lab is to define mechanism underlying the pathology of lysosomal storage disorders. Lysosomes are membrane bound acidic intracellular organelles filled with hydrolytic enzymes that normally function as recycling centers within cells by breaking down damaged cellular macromolecules. Several degenerative diseases designated as lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are associated with the accumulation of material within lysosomes. Tay-Sachs disease, Neimann-Pick disease and Gaucher disease are some of the more common LSDs. For reasons that remain incompletely understood, these diseases often affect the nervous system out of proportion to other organs. As a model for LSDs we are studying the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders. These diseases are the result of a defect in transport of sialic acid across lysosomal membranes and are associated with mutations in the gene encoding the sialic acid transporter sialin. We are using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches to better define the normal function of sialin and to determine how loss of sialin function leads to neurodevelopmental defects and neurodegeneration associated with the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders.

  • Allan L. Reiss

    Allan L. Reiss

    Howard C. Robbins Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory, the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research (CIBSR), focuses on multi-level scientific study of individuals with typical and atypical brain structure and function. Data are obtained from genetic analyses, structural and functional neuroimaging studies, assessment of endocrinological status, neurobehavioral assessment, and analysis of pertinent environmental factors. Our overarching focus is to model how brain disorders arise and to develop disease-specific treatments.

  • David A. Relman

    David A. Relman

    Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My investigative program focuses on human-microbe interactions and human microbial ecology, and primarily concerns the ecology of human indigenous microbial communities; a secondary interest concerns the classification of humans with systemic infectious diseases, based on features of genome-wide gene transcript abundance patterns and pther aspects of the host response.

  • Rhee,June-Wha

    Rhee,June-Wha

    Instructor, Cardiovascular Institute

    Bio Dr. Rhee is a general cardiologist with specialized clinical and research training in cardiovascular drug toxicity and pharmacogenomics. She completed clinical cardiology fellowship and internal medicine residency training at Stanford University School of Medicine. During her post-doctoral training, Dr. Rhee's research focused on elucidating cardiotoxic effects of iron overload and of multiple chemotherapeutic agents using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived models. Her current research employs clinical data, population genomics, and patient-derived iPSCs models to study genetic determinants and mechanisms of drug-induced cardiovascular toxicities. Dr. Rhee's clinic sees cardio-oncology patients and focuses on devising new methods for minimizing cardiovascular complications in that population.

  • Anthony Ricci

    Anthony Ricci

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The auditory sensory cell, the hair cell, detects mechanical stimulation at the atomic level and conveys information regarding frequency and intensity to the brain with high fidelity. Our interests are in identifying specializations associated with mechanotransduction and synaptic transmission leading to the amazing sensitivities of the auditory system. We are also interested in the developmental process, particularly in how development gives insight into repair and regenerative mechanisms.

  • Laura Roberts, MD, MA

    Laura Roberts, MD, MA

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Roberts has performed numerous empirical studies of contemporary ethics issues in medicine and health policy and has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Energy, the National Alliance of Schizophrenia and Depression, the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, and other private and public foundations.

  • Terry Robinson

    Terry Robinson

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Pulmonary) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus on detection of early and progressive Cystic fibrosis (CF) structural lung disease by utilizing chest CT imaging and CT post-processing methodology. Current research efforts involve utilization of low dose infant & children CT imaging protocols and quantitative airway and air trapping algorithms to evaluate early and progressive CF disease.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Endowed Professor in Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Bill Robinson

    Bill Robinson

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab studies the molecular mechanisms of and develops therapies to treat autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and osteoarthritis.

    The overriding objectives of our laboratory are:

    1. To investigate the mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases.

    2. To develop diagnostics and therapeutics for autoimmune diseases.

    3. To investigate the role of inflammation in osteoarthritis.

  • Eunice Rodriguez

    Eunice Rodriguez

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current program of teaching and research integrates: 1) health disparities and social epidemiology, within the broader area of public health, and 2) program evaluation, as a synthesis of theory and methods applied to the evaluation of health and social programs.

  • Samuel Rodriguez, MD

    Samuel Rodriguez, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Bio Dr. Sam Rodriguez is a native of New Jersey and practicing Pediatric Anesthesiologist at Stanford Children's Hospital. He was a member of the self proclaimed greatest Anesthesia Residency Class in history (MGH 2012). He is a founder and co-director of the Stanford CHARIOT Program which creates and studies innovative approaches to treating pediatric pain and stress through technology. The CHARIOT Program has positively impacted thousands of children around the world and has grown to include emerging technologies like virtual reality, augmented reality, and interactive video games. Dr. Rodriguez is also highly involved in medical humanities education at Stanford Medical School and teaches courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels on how studying art can make better physicians.

  • Rajat Rohatgi

    Rajat Rohatgi

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests the overall goal of my laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in signaling systems, to understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states, and to devise new strategies to repair their function.

  • Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    George D. Smith Professor in Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Interests
    Immunetolerance: Mechanisms underlying T-cell tolerance, induction of T-cell anergy and regulatory T cells; Immunomodulation: mAbs, proteins and low molecular weight compounds which can modulate T-cell activation; Primary immunodeficiencies: Characterization of molecular and immunological defects; Gene therapy: Gene transduction of hematopoietic cells for gene therapy in primary immunodeficiencies and metabolic diseases; Hematopoiesis: Mechanisms underlying growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells; Transplantation: Immune reconstitution and T-cell tolerance after allogenic stem cell transplantation; Cytokines/Cytokine receptors: Role in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses

    Clinical Interests
    Primary Immunodeficiencies
    Monogenic Autoimmune Disorders
    Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplantation
    Gene Therapy Clinical Trials
    Cell Therapy Clinical Trials
    Clinical Trials in Autoimmune Diseases and Organ Transplantation
    Clinical Trials in Hemoglobinopathies

  • Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Bio Lisa Goldman Rosas, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford School of Medicine. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Goldman Rosas? research focuses on addressing disparities in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and cancer among racial/ethnic minority families. This research features rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies, participatory qualitative approaches, and shared leadership with patient and community partners. She is passionate about integrating patients, caregivers, community organizations, and other key stakeholders in the research process in order to affect the greatest improvements in health and well-being. As a reflection of this passion, Dr. Goldman Rosas serves as the Faculty Director for the School of Medicine Office of Community Engagement and the Stanford Cancer Institute Community Outreach and Engagement Program. In these roles, she supports other faculty and patient and community partners to develop sustainable and meaningful partnerships to support transformative research. In addition to research, she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels and has a special focus on increasing diversity in biomedical research.

  • Jessica Rose

    Jessica Rose

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Rose's research investigates early brain and motor development in preterm children and neuromuscular mechanisms underlying cerebral palsy (CP). Research examines neonatal microstructural brain development on DTI and physiological correlates of motor function in preterm children. Dr. Rose served on the NIH Taskforce on Childhood Motor Disorders, the AACPDM Research Committee and Steering Committee to develop CDE for CP neuroimaging diagnostics, and serves on the Board of Directors of SBMT.

  • David Rosenthal

    David Rosenthal

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Cardiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests include the study of Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathy and ventricular dysfunction in children, from a clinical perspective. Investigations include clinical trials of medications, cardiac resynchronization, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Bernard Roth

    Bernard Roth

    Rodney H. Adams Professor in the School of Engineering

    Bio Roth is one of the founders of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the d.school) and is active in its development: currently, he serves as Academic Director. His design interests include organizing and presenting workshops on creativity, group interactions, and the problem solving process. Formerly he researched the kinematics, dynamics, control, and design of computer controlled mechanical devices. In kinematics, he studied the mathematical theory of rigid body motions and its application to the design of machines.

  • Stephen J. Roth

    Stephen J. Roth

    Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Randomized Therapeutic Trials in Pediatric Heart Disease, NIH/U01 GrantNo. HL68285 2001-2006.
    Heparin and the Reduction of Thrombosis (HART) Study. Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.
    A Pilot Trial fo B-type Natriuretic Peptide for Promotion of Urine Output in Diuretic-Resistant Infants Following Cardiovascular Surgery.Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.

  • Brian Rutt

    Brian Rutt

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests center on MRI research, including high-field and high-resolution MRI technology development as well as applications of advanced MRI techniques to studying the brain, cardiovascular system and cancer.

  • maura ruzhnikov

    maura ruzhnikov

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Child neurologist and medical geneticist focusing on the diagnosis and management of rare neurologic disorders. Specific interests are in genetic epilepsy syndromes, childhood neurodegenerative and neurometabolic diseases and undiagnosed suspected genetic conditions.

  • Debra Safer

    Debra Safer

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests include the nature and treatment of eating disorders
    (particularly bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder), the development and treatment of obesity, and the development and treatment of problematic eating patterns in patients following bariatric surgery.

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Manish Saggar

    Manish Saggar

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The overarching goal of my research is to develop reliable computational methods that will allow for characterizing and modeling temporal dynamics of brain activity, without averaging data in either space or time. I firmly believe that the spatiotemporal richness in brain activity might hold the key to finding the person- and disorder-centric biomarkers. I am currently developing methods to model the temporal dynamics of brain activity in individuals with fragile X syndrome and healthy controls.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Lee Sanders

    Lee Sanders

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I conduct interdisciplinary research to understand child and parent health literacy as potentially modifiable determinants of child health disparities. I am principal investigator on an multi-site, randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a low-literacy, early-childhood intervention designed to prevent obesity in the first two years of life. The aim of my current scholarship is to apply the health-literacy model to attenuate disparities for children with chronic illness.

  • Meera N. Sankar

    Meera N. Sankar

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My recent clinical research involved being a recipient of Stanford?s Maternal and Child Health Research Institute (MCHRI) Clinician Educator Grant Program to study "Barriers to Optimal Breast Milk Provision and Successful Breastfeeding in the NICU Setting"

  • Peter Luke Santa Maria

    Peter Luke Santa Maria

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology-HNS (Otology and Neurotology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study chronic suppurative otitis media, a chronic biofilm infection of the middle ear predominantly involving pseudomonas and staph aureus. We are investigating mechanisms of sensory hearing loss, host microbe interactions and trialling novel therapeutics.

    Our work in tympanic membrane regeneration has entered clinical trials.

    Novel treatments for wound healing in intra oral wounds with potential applications to prevent post tonsillectomy wound healing and oral mucositis.

  • Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD

    Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research encompasses two main areas: 1) Using next-generation RNA, whole genome, and exome sequencing, we are investigating the genetic alterations involved in skin cancer progression, response to therapy, and other clinical outcomes and 2) We are developing and implementing genome-wide genetic risk prediction assessments for skin cancer into clinical use and studying the impact of this information on patient care.

  • Peter Sarnow

    Peter Sarnow

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory studies virus-host interactions with an emphasis microRNA-mediated gene regulation and on translational control. The mechanism by which a liver-specific microRNA regulates hepatitis C virus genome replication is under intense scrutiny. In addition, the mechanism of internal ribosome entry in certain cellular and viral mRNAs and its biological role in growth and development is being investigated.

  • Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Bio Dr. Sarnquist focuses on applied teaching and research on the development, implementation and evaluation of interventions to decrease gender-based violence and prevent HIV infection, especially among adolescents and children. She is particularly interested in rights-based approaches that tackle the complex interplay of factors that lead to poor health for many children and families. All of her work is applied, with direct links health practice and policy, and usually performed in conjunction with non-governmental organization and government partners. She works both globally and in the U.S., with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa.

  • Ansuman Satpathy

    Ansuman Satpathy

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab works at the interface of immunology, cancer biology, and genomics to study cellular and molecular mechanisms of the immune response to cancer. In particular, we are leveraging high-throughput genomic technologies to understand the dynamics of the tumor-specific T cell response to cancer antigens and immunotherapies (checkpoint blockade, CAR-T cells, and others). We are also interested in understanding the impact of immuno-editing on the heterogeneity and clonal evolution of cancer.

    We previously developed genome sequencing technologies that enable epigenetic studies in primary human immune cells from patients: 1) 3D enhancer-promoter interaction profiling (Nat Genet, 2017), 2) paired epigenome and T cell receptor (TCR) profiling in single cells (Nat Med, 2018), 3) paired epigenome and CRISPR profiling in single cells (Cell, 2019), and high-throughput single-cell ATAC-seq in droplets (Nature Biotech, 2019). We used these tools to study fundamental principles of the T cell response to cancer immunotherapy (PD-1 blockade) directly in cancer patient samples (Nature Biotech, 2019; Nat Med, 2019).

  • David Schneider

    David Schneider

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study innate immunity and microbial pathogenesis. We have been studying models for a variety of bacterial infections including: Listeria, Mycobacteria, Salmonella and Streptococcus as well as some fungi, malaria and viruses. Our current focus is to determine how we recover from infections.

  • Alan Schroeder

    Alan Schroeder

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    Bio Dr. Schroeder is the associate chief for research in the division of pediatric hospital medicine at Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital Stanford, and a clinical professor in the division of hospital medicine and the division of critical care. His research interests focus on identifying areas where we can ?safely do less? in healthcare, and frequently lectures on this theme locally and nationally. Dr. Schroeder is currently involved in multiple projects involving common conditions in pediatrics such as head trauma, bronchiolitis, UTI, meningitis, and febrile infant management. He is a co-chair of the Lown RightCare Alliance Pediatric Council, co-chair of the Academic Pediatric Association?s Healthcare Value Special Interest Group, an editor of the Yearbook of Pediatrics and an associate editor for the journal Hospital Pediatrics. Dr. Schroeder provides clinical care for children in the PICU and the pediatric ward and has won multiple teaching awards.

  • Matthew P. Scott

    Matthew P. Scott

    Professor of Developmental Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research has been focused on the genetic regulation of animal development and its relation to birth defects, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We studied mechanisms and functions of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which controls cell fates and growth, in the context of normal development and brain cancer. We studied a neurodegenerative disease, Niemann-Pick C syndrome, that affects intracellular organelle movements and sterol homeostasis. Due to Dr. Scott's new job, the lab is no longer active.

  • Vittorio Sebastiano

    Vittorio Sebastiano

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The thread of Ariadne that connects germ cells, preimplatation development and pluripotent stem cells is the focus of my research, with a specific interest in human development. My long-term goals are: 1. Understanding the biology of germ cells and and their ability to sustain early preimplantation development; 2. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate very early cell fate decisions in human embryos; 3. Understanding the biology of derivation and maintenance of Pluripotent Stem Cells

  • Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Bio I am a pediatric physician-scientist striving to advance cystic fibrosis clinical care and translational research. Clinically, I am focused on gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis, developing diagnostic and therapeutic modalities to improve the gastrointestinal and liver health of those with cystic fibrosis. I also specialize in the clinical management of pediatric pancreatitis and am involved with the international INSPPIRE consortium to study pediatric pancreatitis. My research spans the entire spectrum across basic science and translational research to clinical research and trials. In the laboratory, my projects are centered around understanding mechanisms of ion transport in cystic fibrosis tissues and determining how loss of CFTR ion transport leads to pathologic changes in human physiology. We are also very interested in the pathophysiological relationship between pancreatitis and intestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease. Our laboratory has expertise in epithelial ion transport, with specialized skills in the measurement of bicarbonate transport. We are also part of a Multi-PI collaboration pursuing CFTR gene editing and stem cell engraftment for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. We utilize a combination of immortalized and primary cell culture, organoids, mouse and human tissue, and whole animal in vivo studies.

  • Ami Shah

    Ami Shah

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio I did my training in Pediatrics and Hematology/ Oncology at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles where I was an attending physician for 15 years.. I joined Stanford University in 2015 as a clinical attending in the Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine. My areas of clinical expertise have been in the areas of transplantation for immune deficiencies and immune reconstitution post HSCT. I was involved with several clinical gene therapy trial for SCID and ALD. My other main areas of research have been in the neurocognitive function post HSCT. I have been involved with several national committees addressing the late effects of HSCT within the ASBMT and COG.

  • Gary M. Shaw

    Gary M. Shaw

    NICU Nurses Professor and Professor (Research), by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests include 1) epidemiology of birth defects, 2) gene-environment approaches to perinatal outcomes, and 3) nutrition and reproductive outcomes.

  • Jonathan Shaw

    Jonathan Shaw

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary care, psycho-social determinants of health & care, maternal-child health

  • Kate Shaw

    Kate Shaw

    Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include expanding access to and and improving patient experience with contraception and abortion care both domestically and globally. I am also interested in medical education and resilience among physicians and trainees.

  • Xinshu She

    Xinshu She

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Health- Promoting Schools in under-served rural China
    Teaching Mental Health via virtual platforms
    Early Childhood Development in undeserved populations

  • Kevin Shea

    Kevin Shea

    Chambers-Okamura Endowed Professor of Pediatric Orthopaedics

    Bio Kevin G. Shea, MD is an orthopaedic surgeon at Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital. Dr. Shea grew up in Montana and California, graduated from the UCLA School of Medicine, and completed his orthopaedic residency at the University of Utah School of Medicine. His advanced training includes pediatric orthopaedics at Rady Children?s Hospital in San Diego, AO Fellowship in Bern Switzerland with Drs. Ganz (Hip), Dr. Diego Fernandez (Trauma), and Dr. Hans Staubli (sports), and Ilizarov Training in Lecco, Italy. He was the AOSSM Traveling Sports Medicine Fellow in 2008, and practiced in Boise, ID prior to joining the Stanford Faculty. Dr. Shea is a founding member of the PRiSM Society (Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine) and the ROCK (Research in OsteoChondritis of the Knee) Multi-center Study Group. He is a member of the AAOS (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons), POSNA (Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America) and the AOSSM (American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine). In addition, Dr. Shea has authored more than 170 scientific papers and book chapters.

  • Hiroyuki Shimada

    Hiroyuki Shimada

    Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Hiroyuki Shimada, MD, PhD, FRCPA (Hon), is Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center. He was born in Tokyo, Japan, and completed MD (1973) and PhD (1982) at the Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan, and also completed his pathology training at the Children's Hospital (now the Nationwide Children?s Hospital) and the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA (1988). Before moving to the Stanford University in 2019, he was Professor of Pathology (Clinical Scholar) at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine and working at the Children?s Hospital Los Angeles.
    Dr. Shimada was Chair of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Committee (1999-2017) and the founder of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Classification (INPC). As Director of the COG (Children?s Oncology Group) Neuroblastoma Pathology Reference Laboratory (since 2001), he has been actively reviewing pathology samples of ~700 neuroblastoma cases per year from United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Pathology review results according to the INPC have been providing critical information for patient stratification and protocol assignment in the COG international neuroblastoma clinical trials.

  • Andrew Young Shin

    Andrew Young Shin

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests SURF PROGRAM
    The SURF program is an innovative collaboration between LPCH, Stanford University Hospital and the Stanford School of Engineering. The program has focused on improving quality and safety of patient care, improving hospital operations and promoting clinical effectiveness utilizing contemporary technologies such as machine learning, mathematical optimization, simulation and a variety of statistical, probabilistic and computational tools. The program has 2 independent funding mechanism to primarily improve patient care/hospital operations and improve academics for faculty within the department of Pediatrics at LPCH.

    https://surf.stanford.edu/


    CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS
    The Clinical Effectiveness (CE) Program is a funded program that aims to understand and improve unnecessary variation in healthcare delivery in order to optimize quality of care and reduce wasteful expenditures. The CE program has developed innovative programs such as Target Based Care, an award-winning intervention to reduce variation in hospital length of stay and currently a multi-center trial involving more than 20 hospitals in North America. In 2016, the CE program included the first CE fellowship program in a pediatric training program with 3 cycles of graduates. The CE program is supported by LPCH and a philanthropic gift by Susan Choe and Thomas Tobiason.

  • Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The timing for intervention in obstruction in the infant and child is poorly understood.Our group has been interested in trying to define the risks that may be involved in obstructive and infectious uropathies and discovering early signs of damage to the urinary tract and kidney. We have explored ways of imaging the urinary tract using nonionizing radiation (US, MRI). We have studied the relationships of sex steroid hormones, pregnancy, reflux, urinary tract infection and urinary tract function.

  • Eric Sibley, M.D., Ph.D.

    Eric Sibley, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic Regulation of Intestinal Development and Maturation. We study transcriptional mechanisms regulating the spatial and temporal restriction of intestine-specific gene expression during gut development. Our approach is to characterize the function of gene-specific DNA cis elements and interacting nuclear proteins in cell culture and in transgenic animals. The goal is to relate the gene-specific control mechanisms to the broader pathways specifying acquisition of a small intestinal phenotype.

  • Douglas Sidell

    Douglas Sidell

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery (Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Sidell's clinical interests include the management of children with voice and swallowing disorders, and congenital or acquired airway abnormalities. Examples of ongoing or upcoming prospective trials include an investigation into the utility of acid suppression in children with laryngomalacia, the management of vocal cord paralysis following cardiac surgery, and the management of type 1 laryngeal clefts in children.

  • Arend Sidow

    Arend Sidow

    Professor of Pathology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We have a highly collaborative research program in the evolutionary genomics of cancer. We apply well-established principles of phylogenetics to cancer evolution on the basis of whole genome sequencing and functional genomics data of multiple tumor samples from the same patient. Introductions to our work and the concepts we apply are best found in the Newburger et al paper in Genome Research and the Sidow and Spies review in TIGS.

    More information can be found here: http://www.sidowlab.org

  • Norman H. Silverman

    Norman H. Silverman

    Honorary Faculty Emeritus, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests center around cardiac ultrasound. I am currently working on several areas in the development of human cardiac ultrasound.

    These are fetal cardiac ultrasound. intraoperative and transesophageal ultrasound imaging in children, imaging potiential for ultrasound two and three dimensional modalities in children with congenital heart disease

  • Julia Simard

    Julia Simard

    Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    Bio Julia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Assistant Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women?s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford?s Epidemiology faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, but her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease. In 2014 she was awarded a five-year K career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This fueled a number of collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was recently awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as SLE.

  • Laura Simons

    Laura Simons

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Pediatric) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The primary goal of my research is to promote the health and well being of children and adolescents with chronic pain and their families. In line with this goal, research projects focus on biological, neurological, cognitive, affective, and social risk and resiliency factors of the pain experience. Projects include brain imaging, longitudinal clinical cohort, and treatment interventions studies.

    Some current research orojects include:

    Learning and Memory in Pediatric Chronic Pain
    Funding: NIH/NICHD R01
    Description: Investigating the mechanisms underlying fear learning, extinction and disruption of fear reconsolidation in adolescents with chronic pain and health controls using behavioral and neuroimaging measures. Multi-site study with Boston Children's Hospital (Collaborator: David Borsook, MD).

    Children Pain Behaviors in Context: A functional-cognitive perspective
    Leading Site: University of Ghent (Collaborator: Liesbet Goubert, PhD)
    Description: Identifying key antecedents and consequences that give rise to and maintain children's pain-related behaviors and investigate impact these antecedents on children's behavior and functioning through daily surveys and activity monitoring.

  • Manpreet K. Singh, MD MS

    Manpreet K. Singh, MD MS

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As part of the Pediatric Mood Disorders Program, Dr. Singh conducts research in the phenomenology, neurobiology, pharmacology, and genetic aspects of depression and bipolar disorder in children. These studies include brain imaging (MRI, MRS, fMRI), medication, and psychotherapy trials. She is particularly interested in risk factors for the development of major mood disorders and associated morbidities, and early intervention strategies to delay the onset and progression of symptoms.

  • Upinder Singh

    Upinder Singh

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab elucidates the molecular basis of pathogenesis of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We use genetic and genomic approaches to identify novel virulence determinants and to characterize the global epidemiology of the parasite.

  • Michael Snyder

    Michael Snyder

    Stanford W. Ascherman, MD, FACS, Professor in Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Hyongsok Tom  Soh

    Hyongsok Tom Soh

    Professor of Radiology (Early Detection), of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Bio Dr. Soh received his B.S. with a double major in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science with Distinction from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Soh served as the technical manager of MEMS Device Research Group at Bell Laboratories and Agere Systems. He was a faculty member at UCSB before joining Stanford in 2015. His current research interests are in analytical biotechnology, especially in high-throughput screening, directed evolution, and integrated biosensors.

  • Ivan Soltesz

    Ivan Soltesz

    James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences

    Bio Ivan Soltesz received his doctorate in Budapest and conducted postdoctoral research at universities at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, in 1995. He became full Professor in 2003, and served as department Chair from 2006 to July 2015. He returned to Stanford in 2015 as the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His major research interest is focused on neuronal microcircuits, network oscillations, cannabinoid signaling and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy.
    His laboratory employs a combination of closely integrated experimental and theoretical techniques, including closed-loop in vivo optogenetics, paired patch clamp recordings, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from identified interneurons in awake mice, 2-photon imaging, machine learning-aided 3D video analysis of behavior, video-EEG recordings, behavioral approaches, and large-scale computational modeling methods using supercomputers. He is the author of a book on GABAergic microcircuits (Diversity in the Neuronal Machine, Oxford University Press), and editor of a book on Computational Neuroscience in Epilepsy (Academic Press/Elsevier). He co-founded the first Gordon Research Conference on the Mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and epilepsy, and taught for five years in the Ion Channels Course at Cold Springs Harbor. He has over 30 years of research experience, with over 20 years as a faculty involved in the training of graduate students (total of 16, 6 of them MD/PhDs) and postdoctoral fellows (20), many of whom received fellowship awards, K99 grants, joined prestigious residency programs and became independent faculty.

  • Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
    Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling
    Modulation of BMP signaling
    BMP signaling in health and disease in the right ventricle of the heart
    "BMP signature" in blood as a biomarker
    BMP signaling in neonatal chronic lung disease

  • Daniel Spielman

    Daniel Spielman

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests are in the field of medical imaging, particularly magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. Current projects include MRI and MRS at high magnetic fields and metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled MRS.

  • Alfred M. Spormann

    Alfred M. Spormann

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Metabolism of anaerobic microbes in diseases, bioenergy, and bioremediation

  • James Spudich

    James Spudich

    Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The general research interest of this laboratory is the molecular basis of cell motility, with a current emphasis on power output by the human heart. We have three specific research interests, the molecular basis of energy transduction that leads to ATP-driven myosin movement on actin, the biochemical basis of the regulation of actin and myosin interaction and their assembly states, and the roles these proteins play in vivo, in cell movement, changes in cell shape and muscle contraction.

  • Sheri Spunt

    Sheri Spunt

    Endowed Professor of Pediatric Cancer

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses primarily on the management of children, adolescents, and young adults with soft tissue sarcomas. I also have an interest in developmental therapeutics and late effects of cancer therapy,

  • Randall Stafford

    Randall Stafford

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As Director of the SPRC Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, my work focuses on cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention, the adoption of new technology and practices, and patterns of physician practice, particularly medication prescribing. Specific interests include measuring and improving the quality of outpatient care, disparities in health care by race, gender, age and socioeconomic status, and interventions to improve prevention outcomes.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Marcia Stefanick, Ph.D a Professor of Medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, (SPRC) and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Dr. Stefanicks research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. Her work on the effects of menopausal hormones on cardiovascular and other health outcomes in mostly healthy postmenopausal women (in the Womens Health Initiative, WHI), in women with established heart disease, (the Heart and Estrogen-progesterone Replacement Study, HERS), and in peri-menopausal and early post-menopausal women (the Postmenopausal Estrogen and Progesterone Interventions, PEPI) trials has been widely disseminated both nationally and internationally. She was also the principal investigator of two large diet trials focusing on the role of a low-fat eating pattern (including increased vegetables & fruits) on preventing breast cancer (WHI) and recurrence (Womens Healthy Eating and Living, WHEL, trial) and she conducted several medium-sized diet, exercise, and weight control trials focused on heart disease risk and body composition that have influenced national guidelines. [She is currently writing a proposal for a large national trial of physical activity in older women with cardiovascular outcomes, not just risk factors.] Her current passion is the study of Sex (and Gender) Differences in Human Physiology and Disease, the title of a course she teaches in Stanfords Human Biology program, in addition to a course entitled: Current Topics and Controversies in Womens Health. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles in Stanfords Cardiovascular Institutes Womens Heart Health Program and Stanford Cancer Institutes Cancer Prevention and Control Program.
    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research directed her to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at SPRC, which has been her academic home for nearly 30 years.

  • Katherine Steffen

    Katherine Steffen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus on using dissemination and implementation science tools to study and enhance care provided to patients in the pediatric ICU. I have a background in human factors research and in implementation science and am also interested in clinical effectiveness and outcomes in the PICU.

  • Lawrence Steinman, MD

    Lawrence Steinman, MD

    George A. Zimmermann Professor and Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory is dedicated to understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, particularly multiple sclerosis. We have developed several new therapies for autoimmunity, including some in Phase 2 clinical trials, as well as one approved drug, natalizumab. We have developed microarray technology for detecting autoantibodies to myelin proteins and lipids. We employ a diverse range of molecular and celluar approaches to trying to understand multiple sclerosis.

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