School of Medicine


Showing 151-166 of 166 Results

  • Peter Johannes van Roessel

    Peter Johannes van Roessel

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr Peter van Roessel, M.D. Ph.D, completed his MD at Stanford University and his residency training in psychiatry at Columbia University and the New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. Prior to joining the clinical faculty at Stanford, he worked for several years as Associate Director of the general research unit of the New York State Psychiatric Institute, a premier state-funded research hospital affiliated with Columbia University, where he provided clinical care for individuals participating in research studies across a spectrum of psychiatric illness, including treatment resistant mood disorders, anxiety disorders, psychosis and substance use disorders.

    At Stanford, he sees adult mood and anxiety disorders outpatients through the Evaluations Clinic and Depression Clinic and participates in resident training and patient care as a supervisor in psychodynamic psychotherapy and as an attending physician in Continuity Clinic. As a member of the department's Rodriguez Translational Therapeutics Lab, he sees individuals with obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders for evaluations and research-protocol driven clinical treatment, and contributes to clinical neuroscience studies pioneering rapid-acting interventions in OCD.

    Dr van Roessel pursued research training basic neuroscience prior to his clinical training, completing an MPhil in Biology via the Open University, UK, for research performed at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen Germany, and a PhD in molecular and developmental neurobiology in the laboratory of Dr Andrea Brand at the University of Cambridge, UK. More recently, he has contributed to work in the lab of Dr Julia Kaltschmidt (Sloan Kettering Institute, now Stanford) on studies of GABAergic/Glutamatergic interneuronal circuity in mouse. In the Rodriguez Lab, he is pursuing clinically-motivated research interests related to the nature and neural correlates of insight in obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. He has additionally received a 2018 NARSAD Young Investigator Award to pursue a novel glutamatergic rapid-acting treatment for OCD.

  • Po Wang

    Po Wang

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Bipolar Disorders, Psychopharmacology, Treatment, Anticonvulsants, Mood stabilizers

  • Nolan Williams

    Nolan Williams

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Williams is an Assistant Professor within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Director of the Stanford Brain Stimulation Lab. Dr. Williams has a broad background in neuropsychiatry and is double board-certified in both neurology and psychiatry. In addition, he has specific training and clinical expertise in the development of brain stimulation methodologies under Mark George, MD. Themes of his work include (a) examining the use of spaced learning theory in the application of neurostimulation techniques, (b) development and mechanistic understanding of rapid-acting antidepressants, and (c) identifying objective biomarkers that predict neuromodulation responses in treatment-resistant neuropsychiatric conditions. He has published papers in high impact peer-reviewed journals including Brain, American Journal of Psychiatry, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. He has also contributed to two reviews related to novel therapeutics for neuropsychiatric conditions that have been published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation and Current Opinion in Neurobiology, which are both highly cited. Results from his studies have gained widespread attention in journals such as Science and New England Journal of Medicine Journal Watch as well as in the popular press and have been featured in various news sources including Time, Smithsonian, and Newsweek. Dr. Williams received two NARSAD Young Investigator Awards in 2016 and 2018 along with the 2019 Gerald R. Klerman Award. Dr. Williams received the National Institute of Mental Health Biobehavioral Research Award for Innovative New Scientists in 2020.

  • Helen Wilson

    Helen Wilson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Wilson is a licensed clinical psychologist with expertise on the effects of trauma across the lifespan. She provides clinical services for children, adolescents, adults, and families affected by trauma and other forms of anxiety and stress. Dr. Wilson also leads an active research program focused on relationships between childhood trauma and health risk behavior in adolescence and adulthood. She is the Principal Investigator of GIRLTALK: We Talk, a longitudinal study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) that examines links from childhood violence exposure to dating violence and sexual risk in young women from low-income communities in Chicago. Dr. Wilson has authored or co-authored thirty journal articles and book chapters related to these topics, and she regularly presents her work at local and national conferences. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

  • Jong H. Yoon

    Jong H. Yoon

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research seeks to discover the brain mechanisms responsible for schizophrenia and to translate this knowledge into the clinic to improve how we diagnose and treat this condition. Towards these ends, our group has been developing cutting-edge neuroimaging tools to identify neurobiological abnormalities and test novel systems-level disease models of psychosis and schizophrenia directly in individuals with these conditions.

    We have been particularly interested in the role of neocortical-basal ganglia circuit dysfunction. A working hypothesis is that some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia are attributable to impairments in neocortical function that results in disconnectivity with components of the basal ganglia and dysregulation of their activity. The Yoon Lab has developed new high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging methods to more precisely measure the function of basal ganglia components, which given their small size and location deep within the brain has been challenging. This includes ways to measure the activity of nuclei that store and control the release of dopamine throughout the brain, a neurochemical that is one of the most important factors in the production of psychosis in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric conditions.

  • Mira Zein

    Mira Zein

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Zein received her dual bachelor?s degrees in Anthropology and Physiological Science at UCLA and worked initially as a healthcare consultant, developing programs that improve healthcare access for vulnerable populations. She returned to school to pursue a Masters in Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, where she further developed her interests in the intersection of medicine and broader social-cultural themes, particularly the impact on mental health. Her research foci were disaster response interventions for physical and mental health and the impact of the built environment on public health. During her masters, she worked with the International Rescue Committee in Baltimore to help address the acculturation and psychological stress the Baltimore refugee population faced in resettlement.

    In 2010, Dr. Zein began her medical training at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. During medical school she continue to pursue interests in global and cultural health. She represented McGill nationally as the Global Health Advocate in the Canadian Federation of Medical Students, and focused on national and local clinical projects to support refugee and asylum seeker access to medical and mental health treatment. She was awarded the Mona Bronfman Sheckman Prize in Psychiatry for her work. During her psychiatry residency training at New York University (NYU), Dr. Zein continued pursuing her interest in global mental health, working as a group leader for refugees/asylum seekers in the Bellevue Survivors of Torture program, and the Association for Culture and Psychiatry. She also became interested in Integrated Behavioral Health, particularly the University of Washington's Ambulatory Integration of the Medical and Social (AIMs) model, or Collaborative Care Model. She founded the Integrated Behavioral Health resident working group and designed a two-year resident training program in the Collaborative Care Model as well as pioneered other electives in HIV psychiatry and psych-oncology. She completed training in the AIMs model and also was part of an intensive collaborative pilot with the AIMs center to a complete a quality-improvement (QI) project in the Bellevue Hospital primary care site. As part of the two-year resident training program she developed a Collaborative Care model in one of NYU Langone-Brooklyn's FQHC sites. In her last two years of residency she was an APA Leadership Fellow, and served on the APA Consult-Liaison Psychiatry Committee. She worked on a Decisional Capacity Guidelines paper with other committee members, and presented on Consult Liaison educational opportunities and Integrated Behavioral Health Models at the APA conference. She completed residency as a chief resident and won awards for Excellence in Resident Teaching as well as for humanism and clinical excellence in the Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    Dr. Zein completed her Consult Liaison Fellowship at Stanford and has remained as clinical faculty. She is currently serving as an attending psychiatrist on the General, Intensive Care, and ED-Psychiatry consult services as well as developing an Integrated Behavioral Health model for the Stanford Primary Care Clinic serving Cisco employees and their families. She is currently working on expanding Integrated Behavioral health to other Stanford Primary Care Clinics

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