School of Medicine


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  • Arash Anoshiravani

    Arash Anoshiravani

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Adolescent Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests include high-risk youth, adolescent health services, and the juvenile justice system.

  • David Ansel

    David Ansel

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Bio I am a Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician (DBP) with clinical interests that include developmental delay, intellectual and learning disabilities, ADHD, autism, Asperger?s, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, tic disorders, and psychopharmacology.

    The first 28 years of my career were spent in clinical practice combining both DBP and primary care (the latter focused on serving CSHCN). During those years I was involved in numerous divide-bridging efforts - including programs to coordinate inpatient & outpatient medicine, connect tertiary & primary care, and promote teamwork between pediatricians, psychologists, nurse practitioners, and other community partners. I founded my own solo practice in 1989 and managed its growth to an 8-provider group over the next 25 years. Our practice was a founding member of the PPOC and I served on its board of directors for 6 years. The PPOC is one of the largest pediatric IPA?s in the country, with >200 member providers affiliated with Boston Children's Hospital. Over the years we've been involved in groundbreaking QI initiatives including those involving asthma, weight, and ADHD management; medical home; and behavioral health integration with primary care.

    I?m pleased now to have an opportunity for a ?second act? on the clinician-educator track here at Stanford. I hope to use my unique experience straddling primary care and sub-specialty worlds to develop programs supporting DB assessment and care inside the medical home generally, and across the Packard Children's Health Alliance primary care network in particular.

  • Eric Appel

    Eric Appel

    Assistant Professor of Material Science and Engineering and, by courtesy of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The underlying theme of the Appel Lab at Stanford University integrates concepts and approaches from supramolecular chemistry, natural/synthetic materials, and biology. We aim to develop supramolecular biomaterials that exploit a diverse design toolbox and take advantage of the beautiful synergism between physical properties, aesthetics, and low energy consumption typical of natural systems. Our vision is to use these materials to solve fundamental biological questions and to engineer advanced healthcare solutions.

  • Ronald L. Ariagno

    Ronald L. Ariagno

    Professor (Clinical) of Pediatrics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Developmental Physiology and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Research Laboratory closed in 2008.

    Current effort, as Chair of Task Force and neonatal consult at the FDA, is to establish through consensus a culture of investigation and collaboration for all clinical neonatology practices: academic, corporate and community based to maximize the opportunity to participate in research effort needed for the regulatory approval of neonatal therapeutics to improve the outcome of critically ill infants.

  • Steven Artandi

    Steven Artandi

    Director, Stanford Cancer Institute, Jerome and Daisy Low Gilbert Professor and Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect chromosome ends and shorten with cell division and aging. We are interested in how telomere shortening influences cancer, stem cell function, aging and human disease. Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that synthesizes telomere repeats and is expressed in stem cells and in cancer. We have found that telomerase also regulates stem cells and we are pursuing the function of telomerase through diverse genetic and biochemical approaches.

  • Ann M. Arvin

    Ann M. Arvin

    Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory investigates the pathogenesis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, focusing on the functional roles of particular viral gene products in pathogenesis and virus-cell interactions in differentiated human cells in humans and in Scid-hu mouse models of VZV cell tropisms in vivo, and the immunobiology of VZV infections.

  • Euan A. Ashley

    Euan A. Ashley

    Associate Dean, School of Medicine, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular), of Genetics, of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Ashley lab is focused on precision medicine. We develop methods for the interpretation of whole genome sequencing data to improve the diagnosis of genetic disease and to personalize the practice of medicine. At the wet bench, we take advantage of cell systems, transgenic models and microsurgical models of disease to prove causality in biological pathways and find targets for therapeutic development.

  • Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic Epidemiology, Genetic Determinants of Complex Traits related to Cardiovasular Medicine, Coronary Artery Disease related pathway analyses and integrative genomics, Mendelian randomization studies, risk prediction for major adverse cardiovascular events, cardiovascular medicine related pharmacogenomics, ethnic differences in the determinants of Insulin Mediated Glucose Uptake, pharmacoepidemiology of cardiovascular drugs & outcomes

  • Laura Attardi

    Laura Attardi

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation and Cancer Biology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is aimed at defining the pathways of p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression, using a combination of biochemical, cell biological, and mouse genetic approaches. Our strategy is to start by generating hypotheses about p53 mechanisms of action using primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), and then to test them using gene targeting technology in the mouse.

  • Jeffrey Axelrod

    Jeffrey Axelrod

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic and cell biological analyses of signals controlling cell polarity and morphogenesis. Frizzled signaling and cytoskeletal organization.

  • Rosa Bacchetta

    Rosa Bacchetta

    Associate Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In the coming years, I plan to further determine the genetic and immunological basis of diseases with autoimmunity or immune dysregulation in children. I believe that much can still be learned from the in depth mechanistic studies of pediatric autoimmune diseases. Genomic analysis of the patients' samples has become possible which may provide a rapid indication of altered target molecules. I plan to implement robust functional studies to define the consequences of these genetic abnormalities and bridge them to the patient's clinical phenotype.

    Understanding functional consequences of gene mutations in single case/family first and then validating the molecular and cellular defects in other patients with similar phenotypes, will anticipate and complement cellular and gene therapy strategies.

    For further information please visit the Bacchetta Lab website:
    http://med.stanford.edu/bacchettalab.html

  • Laura K. Bachrach

    Laura K. Bachrach

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Prevention of osteoporosis begins in childhood and adolescence by measures that maximize acquistion of bone mineral during the critical adolescent years. Body mass, calcium nutriture, physical activity, growth and sex steroid hormones, and genetic factors are all thought to be important determinants of bone mass although the relative contribution of each remains controversial.

  • Julie Baker

    Julie Baker

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory is focused on identifying proteins based upon their ability to alter a variety of cell fate decisions - including mesodermal, endodermal, neural, endothelial, and somitic - within the vertebrate embryo.

  • Karthik Balakrishnan

    Karthik Balakrishnan

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (Pediatrics) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Balakrishnan's research focuses on innovative ways to improve and standardize treatments and measure outcomes in complex pediatric airway and aerodigestive conditions , as well as ways to reduce treatment costs and medical errors. By improving outcomes and reducing costs, he aims to improve the value of care, while also optimizing patient and caregiver experience during the care process.

  • Maria Barna

    Maria Barna

    Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab studies how intricate control of gene expression and cell signaling is regulated on a minute-by-minute basis to give rise to the remarkable diversity of cell types and tissue morphology that form the living blueprints of developing organisms. Work in the Barna lab is presently split into two main research efforts. The first is investigating ribosome-mediated control of gene expression genome-wide in space and time during cellular differentiation and organismal development. This research is opening a new field of study in which we apply sophisticated mass spectrometry, computational biology, genomics, and developmental genetics, to characterize a ribosome code to gene expression. Our research has shown that not all of the millions of ribosomes within a cell are the same and that ribosome heterogeneity can diversify how genomes are translated into proteomes. In particular, we seek to address whether fundamental aspects of gene regulation are controlled by ribosomes harboring a unique activity or composition that are tuned to translating specific transcripts by virtue of RNA regulatory elements embedded within their 5?UTRs. The second research effort is centered on employing state-of-the-art live cell imaging to visualize cell signaling and cellular control of organogenesis. This research has led to the realization of a novel means of cell-cell communication dependent on a dense network of actin-based cellular extension within developing organs that interconnect and facilitate the precise transmission of molecular information between cells. We apply and create bioengineering tools to manipulate such cellular interactions and signaling in-vivo.

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