School of Medicine


Showing 51-100 of 166 Results

  • Katherine Eisen

    Katherine Eisen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eisen is a Clinical Assistant Professor and CA Licensed Clinical Psychologist working with the INSPIRE Clinic at Stanford. Her research and clinical interest center on therapeutic interventions that support recovery for individuals living with serious mental illness, in particular for individuals with psychosis. Dr. Eisen received her bachelor?s degree from Cornell University, and her PhD from the University of Connecticut, and completed postdoctoral training at Stanford University. Before coming to the INSPIRE Clinic, Dr. Eisen worked for over 10 years as a psychologist on the acute inpatient units at Stanford Health Care. Dr. Eisen is trained in CBT for psychosis (CBTp) and has worked with colleagues to train therapists, nursing and multidisciplinary staff, medical students, and residents to integrate CBTp informed, recovery-oriented approaches into their work with individuals with psychosis. She provides both individual and group-based cognitive behavioral therapy.

  • Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eshel (he/him/his) is a psychiatrist and instructor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His clinical focus is the full-spectrum mental health care of sexual and gender minorities, with particular interest in depression, anxiety, and the complex effects of trauma in this population. He works in collaboration with other primary care and mental health providers at the new Stanford LGBTQ+ program.

    His research interests include the use of optogenetic, electrophysiological, neuroimaging, and behavioral approaches to probe the neural circuits of reward processing, decision making, and social behavior. He recently won a multi-year grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to study the neural circuits of frustration and aggression.

    Dr. Eshel has published articles on topics such as the role of dopamine in learning, the neuroscience of irritability, LGBTQ health, reward and punishment processing in depression, behavioral predictors of substance use among adolescents, and the mechanism of transcranial magnetic stimulation. His work has appeared in Nature, Science, Nature Neuroscience, Annual Review of Neuroscience, JAMA, JAMA Psychiatry, Neuropsychopharmacology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Journal of Neuroscience. He is also the author of the book Learning: The Science Inside, a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    He has delivered presentations on anger expression in patients with PTSD, the neural circuitry of learning, dopamine prediction errors, and LGBTQ-related topics at meetings of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, Society of Biological Psychiatry, and Association of American Medical Colleges, among others. He is also an associate editor of the Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health, and an ad-hoc reviewer for numerous publications including Science, JAMA Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, and Current Biology.


    Dr. Eshel has won honors for his scholarship and advocacy, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Outstanding Resident Award from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Science and SciLifeLab Grand Prize for Young Scientists, and the National LGBT Health Achievement Award.

    He is a member of the American Psychiatric Association, Society of Biological Psychiatry, Association of Gay & Lesbian Psychiatrists, Society for Neuroscience, and other professional associations. He is also an advocate for LGBTQ rights, recently serving as the LGBTQ Chair of the Stanford Graduate Medical Education Diversity Committee.

    Prior to Stanford, Dr. Eshel trained and conducted research at the National Institutes of Health, Princeton University, the World Health Organization, University College London, and Harvard University.

  • Stephanie Allen Evans

    Stephanie Allen Evans

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Resume visible at http://bit.ly/EvansResume
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  • Lief Ericsson Fenno

    Lief Ericsson Fenno

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Fenno is a psychiatrist and Instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Leveraging his strengths in neuroscience research and bioengineering, his goal is to design, construct, validate, and apply novel molecular and viral tools to understand the brain in health and disease for the benefit of diverse patient populations. His clinical interests include the treatment of substance use disorders and co-occurring mood disorders.

    His specific research interests include the development and application of novel optogenetic tools that combine genetically encoded molecules and light to modulate neurons. Dr. Fenno directs a team focused on expanding the use of novel, intersectional viral targeting approaches, with the objective of precisely establishing links between neuron circuitry and behavior. He has patented advances for optically controlled CNS dysfunction and social dysfunction.

    Dr. Fenno has co-written articles on optogenetic tools and other topics in the journals Annual Review of Neuroscience, Neurobiology of Mental Illness, Molecular Psychiatry, Current Protocols in Neuroscience, Nature, and Cell. He is also the co-author of articles on neural mechanisms of autism spectrum disorder, which have appeared in Science Translational Medicine and Nature.

    Dr. Fenno has delivered presentations worldwide at events including the meeting of the National Science Foundation NeuroNex Program of Next Generation Networks for Neuroscience. He also has been an invited speaker at the Robarts Research Institute, a Canada-based facility accelerating medical discovery of treatments for some of the most debilitating diseases of our time, and the Gordon Research Conference on Molecular Pharmacology, an international forum for the presentation of pre-publication frontier research.

    For his scholarship and teaching achievements, Dr. Fenno has won numerous honors. They include the Laughlin Fellowship from the American College of Psychiatrists, which honors individuals deemed likely to make a significant contribution to the field of psychiatry, and the Humanism and Excellence in Teaching Award from the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, which honors exceptional teaching skills and commitment to the compassionate treatment of patients and families, students, and colleagues.

    Dr. Fenno is a member of the Society for Neuroscience, The American Medical Association, and the American Society of Addiction Medicine.

  • Katie Fracalanza

    Katie Fracalanza

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Fracalanza is interested in factors underlying the development and maintenance of mood and anxiety disorders. She has conducted research on cognitive factors thought to maintain anxiety, such as intolerance of uncertainty and perfectionism. She is interested in the patient perspective, and conducting research from a qualitative lens to better understand this.

  • Elise Gibbs

    Elise Gibbs

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Elise Gibbs is a licensed psychologist who provides cognitive behavioral therapy for individuals with eating, mood, and anxiety disorders. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium and her BA with Honors and Distinction in Psychology from Stanford University. She completed her clinical internship at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center - VA Internship Consortium and her postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University?s School of Medicine.

  • Nancy A. Haug

    Nancy A. Haug

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Nancy A. Haug, Ph.D. is Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor and Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program Faculty in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She currently leads didactics and a journal club for Addiction Medicine fellows, and supervises a supplemental practicum for doctoral students who are co-facilitating group therapy.

    Dr. Haug is also Professor and Associate Chair of the Department of Psychology at Palo Alto University where she teaches, advises and supervises graduate students, and leads the Harm Reduction and Addiction Treatment Research Laboratory. Dr. Haug previously served as faculty and attending psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry at University of California San Francisco, and taught in the University of California, Berkeley Alcohol & Drug Studies program.

    Dr. Haug was recently funded by SAMHSA for a practitioner-education initiative to expand training for evidence-based addiction treatment. She is active in the Society of Addiction Psychology (American Psychological Association, Division 50) and chairs the Outreach and Dissemination committee. Dr. Haug is on the editorial board of the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs and the Journal of Addictive Diseases. Throughout her academic career, Dr. Haug has focused on behavioral and psychosocial interventions for treating addiction, and currently has projects studying mindfulness group treatment for addiction, cannabis vaping practices and online interventions for alcohol harm reduction. Dr. Haug has been licensed in CA since 2004 and has a private practice which informs her research and teaching.

  • Chris Hayward

    Chris Hayward

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Hayward's research has focused on risk factors for the onset of adolescent internalizing disorders in adolescent girls and the role of early puberty specifically.

  • Kimberly Hill

    Kimberly Hill

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Hill received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Ohio University. She completed her predoctoral internship at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System and postdoctoral fellowship in the Psychiatry Department at the Stanford University School of Medicine where she currently serves as a Clinical Professor. Dr. Hill has published articles and made presentations related to psychology training, pain management, serious mental illness including Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and sexual dysfunction.

    Dr. Hill's time is divided across clinical, research, administrative, and teaching domains. Her current clinical interests are varied including anxiety, mood disorders, relationship difficulties, and post-traumatic stress disorder. The bulk of her time is committed to psychology training as the Director of Clinical Training for the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium. On a national level, she currently serves as a Board Member of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC).

  • Janie J. Hong, Ph.D.

    Janie J. Hong, Ph.D.

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Hong is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and psychologist in the Adult Neurodevelopment Clinic. She is invested in developing evidence-based ways to individualize care and address diversity factors in therapy. She has published and presented widely on these and other topics in psychology.

    In clinical practice, she specializes in providing cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and other evidence based treatments. She is also committed to helping neurodiverse and culturally diverse individuals work with their differences, navigate prevailing social norms, and advocate for their needs as diverse individuals.

  • Valerie Hoover

    Valerie Hoover

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Hoover's research interests include translating behavioral weight management interventions to the Cardiology setting, and developing novel interventions to improve biopsychosocial outcomes in Cardiology.

  • Rona Hu

    Rona Hu

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Hu is Medical Director of the Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Unit at Stanford Hospital, specializing in the care of those with serious mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar and depression. She completed medical school and residency in psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, and fellowships in Pharmacology and Schizophrenia Research through the National Institutes of Health. She is also active in the minority issues and cultural psychiatry, and has received regional and national recognition for her clinical care, research and teaching.

  • Agnieszka Kalinowski

    Agnieszka Kalinowski

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio I am a translational physician-scientist focused on studying the role of the immune system in patients with schizophrenia. My work spans careful clinical characterization of patients to understanding mechanisms in basic science model systems, allowing to provide mechanistic understanding to observations in clinical samples. Currently, I'm focused on deciphering the role of the complement system and how the known genetic risk translates into pathophysiological disease mechanisms. I hope that this work will pave the way to novel treatment strategies.

  • Katherine Kaplan

    Katherine Kaplan

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kaplan's research interests span four (often overlapping) domains: (1) pathophysiologic aspects of insomnia and hypersomnia in mood disorders, including mechanisms, correlates, and sequelae of these sleep disturbances; (2) behavioral interventions for sleep disturbances in adults and adolescents; (3) circadian and psychosocial factors impacting sleep in adolescence; and (4) machine learning approaches to big data.

  • Laura B. Kasper, PhD

    Laura B. Kasper, PhD

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio I am psychologist and have been practicing psychotherapy for over 18 years. I have experience working with a diverse group of clients with respect to presenting concerns, gender, sexual orientation, and race/ethnicity.

    Regardless of their background, the majority of my clients are highly intelligent and accomplished people who are interested in taking their personal and professional relationships to the next level, starting with themselves. My therapeutic approach blends my first-hand experience of the high-performing professional workplace with buddhist psychology and tools to offer support that is unrelentingly compassionate, direct, and powerful.

    I have particular research and clinical expertise in authenticity with one's self and in relationships, interpersonal communication, and issues of sexual orientation, gender, and sexuality. My services include individual, couples, and group psychotherapy. I also do video counseling sessions with individuals and couples in CA, DC and VA, the places where I am licensed.

    I earned my master?s and doctoral degrees from the University of Maryland?s Counseling Psychology program. I completed my internship and post-doctoral training, and was a Staff Psychologist at the The George Washington University Counseling Center for several years before starting my private practice. I am currently in the Interpersonal Dynamics Facilitator Training Program at Stanford University in the Graduate School of Business to become a small group facilitator for their popular elective, Interpersonal Dynamics.

    I have been practicing Vipassana meditation for over fifteen years. I?ve spent eighty-five days on silent meditation retreats in that time, and have a mindfulness orientation to my work.

    I am a member of the American Group Psychotherapy Association and the Northern California Group Psychotherapy Society, and the Northern California Society for Psychoanalytic Psychology. I am licensed and insured in California (PSY28532), Washington D.C. (PSY1000362) and Virginia (PSY0810004715).

  • Jennifer Keller

    Jennifer Keller

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests interpersonal violence and abuse prevention; empowerment of women; cognitive and affective information processing in depression; clinical, biological, and neuropsychological aspects of depression; South Asian mental health

  • Terence Ketter

    Terence Ketter

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Psychopharmacology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The use of brain imaging methods for understanding the neurobiology of mood disorders and to target treatments for patients with bipolar disorders. Research in the use of novel medications and combinations of medications in the treatment of bipolar disorders. Research on the development and course of bipolar disorder in late adolescence and young adulthood, particularly in college students, and links between creativity, temperament, and mood disorders.

  • Jessie Kittle

    Jessie Kittle

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Hypnosis for perioperative symptom management in elective orthopedic surgery.

  • Ian H. Kratter, MD, PhD

    Ian H. Kratter, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Kratter is a fellowship-trained psychiatrist and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is also director of Invasive Technologies in the Stanford Brain Stimulation Laboratory.

    His clinical interests include depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, eating disorders, sleep disorders, adult autism spectrum disorder, Huntington?s disease, and neuropsychiatric predictors of outcomes following deep brain stimulation for Parkinson?s disease.

    His research interests include deep brain stimulation and neuroimaging. He is a co-investigator of a study of deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder. He is also a co-investigator of a study exploring the use of individualized neuroimaging biomarkers to predict OCD patients? response to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). This therapy is a noninvasive form of brain stimulation that uses a magnet to stimulate targeted areas of the brain. Both studies are supported by the Foundation for OCD Research

    Dr. Kratter has published articles on topics such as deep brain stimulation for Parkinson?s disease and gene-targeting therapy for Huntington disease. His work has appeared in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, and American Journal of Human Genetics. He also co-authored the chapter on major depression in the textbook Deep Brain Stimulation: Techniques and Practice.

    Dr. Kratter has presented his work at the annual meetings of the American Neuropsychiatric Association, Hereditary Disease Foundation, and Society for Neuroscience. Topics include cognitive changes following deep brain stimulation for Parkinson?s disease, antipsychotic-induced thrombocytopenia, and mediators of pathology in Huntington?s disease.

    For his scholarship and research achievements, Dr. Kratter has won numerous honors. They include the Miller Foundation Award for Psychiatric Research. He also won the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

    He is or has been a member of the American Neuropsychiatric Association, American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology, American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine, and Society for Neuroscience.

  • Sheila Lahijani

    Sheila Lahijani

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio After graduating from Brown Medical School, Dr. Lahijani completed the Combined Internal Medicine/Psychiatry Residency Program at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. She then served as a physician in the areas of primary care and triple diagnosis (addiction, HIV, mental health).

    Thereafter, Dr. Lahijani completed the Psychosomatic Medicine Fellowship at the Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University where she worked at the Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. During her fellowship, she also served as a psycho-oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Lahijani is trained in and administers different psychotherapeutic modalities, including Meaning Centered Psychotherapy and Dignity Therapy.

    Dr. Lahijani joined the faculty of Stanford University School of Medicine in 2015 as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Since her initial appointment, Dr. Lahijani has served as the lead psychiatric oncologist at the Stanford Cancer Center where she has provided psychiatric consultation services to patients with cancer and collaborated closely with her hematology and oncology colleagues to deliver comprehensive cancer care.

    In 2019, she was appointed as the Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center Psychosocial Oncology Program where she works in Stanford Cancer Center leadership and oversees the development and operationalization of psychiatric consultation for patients with cancer. Dr. Lahijani also attends on the inpatient Consultation Liaison Psychiatry Service at Stanford Hospital and Clinics to provide care for all patients with complex medical and psychiatric diagnoses and to teach psychiatry, internal medicine, and neurology trainees.

    As Faculty of the Advancing Communication Excellence at Stanford, Dr. Lahijani leads foundational workshops for faculty and staff to advance communication skills with patients, families, and their colleagues. She is committed to developing and contributing to efforts that focus on relationship centered skills and provider wellness.

    Her clinical and scholarly interests include the interface of Medicine and Psychiatry, Psycho-Oncology, psychopharmacology, collaborative care models, psychotherapy for the medically ill, interdisciplinary medical education, teaching, and academic writing.

  • Laura C. Lazzeroni, Ph.D.

    Laura C. Lazzeroni, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Statistics/Data Science. I develop & apply models, methods & algorithms for complex data in medical science & biology. I am also interested in the interplay between fundamental statistical properties (e.g. variability, bias, p-values) & how scientists actually use & interpret data. My work in statistical genetics includes: the invention of Plaid bi-clustering for gene expression data; methods for twin, association, & family studies; multiple testing & estimation for high dimensional arrays.

  • Anna Lembke, MD

    Anna Lembke, MD

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) and, by courtesy, of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Anna Lembke received her undergraduate degree in Humanities from Yale University and her medical degree from Stanford University. She is currently Associate Professor and Medical Director of Addiction Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine. She is also Program Director of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Fellowship, and Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic. She is a diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and a diplomate of the American Board of Addiction Medicine.

    Dr. Lembke was one of the first in the medical community to sound the alarm regarding opioid overprescribing and the opioid epidemic. In 2016, she published her best-selling book on the prescription drug epidemic, "Drug Dealer, MD ? How Doctors Were Duped, Patients Got Hooked, and Why It?s So Hard to Stop" (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016). Her book was highlighted in the New York Times as one of the top five books to read to understand the opioid epidemic (Zuger, 2018).

    "Drug Dealer, MD" combines case studies with public policy, cultural anthropology, and neuroscience, to explore the complex relationship between doctors and patients around prescribing controlled drugs. It has had an impact on policy makers and legislators across the nation. Dr. Lembke has testified before Congress and consulted with governors and senators from Kentucky to Missouri to Nevada. She was a featured guest on Fresh Air with Terry Gross, MSNBC with Chris Hayes, and numerous other media broadcasts.

    Using her public platform and her faculty position at Stanford University School of Medicine, Dr. Lembke has developed multiple teaching programs on addiction and safe prescribing, as well as opioid tapering. She has held multiple leadership and mentorship positions and received the Stanford?s Chairman?s Award for Clinical Innovation, and the Stanford Departmental Award for Outstanding Teaching. Dr. Lembke continues to educate policymakers and the public about causes of and solutions for the problem of addiction.

    Look for her new book, "Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence" (Dutton/Penguin Random House, August 2021).

  • Stacy Lin

    Stacy Lin

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Stacy Lin is a licensed psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences who provides culturally-informed psychotherapy for the treatment of emotion dysregulation, eating disorders, and trauma. Dr. Lin has specialized training in comprehensive Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. She is broadly interested in issues of diversity and inclusion in clinical, training, and professional settings. Her research has examined cultural factors affecting disordered eating and body image in racial/ethnic minorities.

  • Anne Juliana Lockman

    Anne Juliana Lockman

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Juliana Lockman is Clinical Assistant Professor in the Neuropsychiatry Division in Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. She is also appointed to La Selva Group, where she directs the Functional Neurologic Symptom Disorder (FND) Track within their state-of-the-art residential, partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient programs. She completed residencies in both Neurology at the University of Virginia and Psychiatry at Stanford Hospital & Clinics. Her clinical activities include providing pharmacologic and behavioral care for clients with psychiatric and behavioral conditions in the context of neurological illness, including epilepsy, stroke, movement disorders and others. She also teaches and supervises Stanford residents and fellows in Neuropsychiatry. Professional goals include advancement of research and clinical care and improving access for clients suffering from neuropsychiatric conditions, including FND and related disorders.

  • Kristine Luce

    Kristine Luce

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Luce is a Psychologist and Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Kent State University. She completed a pre-doctoral internship at the Seattle Veterans Hospital and a post-doctoral research fellowship at Stanford University in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Luce has specialized clinical and research experience with eating-related disorders and is the Co-Director of the Stanford Adult Eating and Weight Disorders Clinic. In addition, Dr. Luce treats anxiety and mood disorders and has specialized clinical training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy.

  • Maryam S. Makowski, PhD, FACN

    Maryam S. Makowski, PhD, FACN

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Maryam S. Makowski, PhD, FACN is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Makowski is a Certified Lifestyle, Health and Wellness Coach. The focus of her current work is reducing fatigue and improving mood and cognitive performance of professionals with high cognitive demands. As a member of Stanford Medicine WellMD & WellPhD Center team, Dr. Makowski leads initiatives at that promote personal well-being, self-care and culture of wellness among clinicians at Stanford Medicine.

    Dr. Makowski is a Fellow of the American College of Nutrition, a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, American and Canadian Nutrition Societies, and American Nutrition Association. She completed her masters and doctoral studies in clinical nutrition, nutritional epidemiology and medical science at University of Toronto in Canada. Over the course of her career, she has authored many highly cited scientific papers on nutrition and clinician well-being.

  • Jose R. Maldonado, MD, FAPM

    Jose R. Maldonado, MD, FAPM

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) and, by courtesy, of Emergency Medicine and of Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Law

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pathophysiology and Management of Delirium, Acute Brain Failure and Cognitive Impairment, Neuropsychiatric Sequelae of Traumatic Brain Injury, Factitious Disorder & Munchausen's Syndrome, Cultural Diversity in Medical Care, Psychiatric Complications of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Conversion Disorder, Depression in the Medically Ill, Neuropsychiatric Sequelae of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

  • Rachel Manber, PhD

    Rachel Manber, PhD

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1) Insomnia during pregnancy
    2) Acupuncture for chronic low back pain

  • Johnna Medina

    Johnna Medina

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Johnna Medina, PhD, is a Clinical Instructor at Stanford medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, where she is an attending psychologist in the Addiction Medicine/Dual-Diagnosis Clinic and continues to collaborate on research projects evaluating mind-body interrelationships (e.g., stress and health) and interventions (e.g., hypnosis, yoga). Dr. Medina earned her bachelor's degrees in Psychology and Art Practice at Stanford University (2009) and her PhD in Clinical Psychology at UT Austin (2017). Her dissertation research focused on exercise and yoga-based interventions for targeting anxiety-related risk and maintenance factors underlying addictive behaviors. She returned to Stanford to complete her postdoctoral research fellowship (2017-2019) as a T32 scholar working under Dr. David Spiegel in the Center on Stress and Health Lab.

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