School of Medicine


Showing 601-650 of 714 Results

  • David A. Stevens

    David A. Stevens

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Immunology and chemotherapy of human fungal diseases, particularly coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) in California and aspergillosis, and the parasitic disease, trypanosomiasis.

  • David Stevenson

    David Stevenson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on disorders of the RAS/MAPK pathway (eg. NF1, Noonan, CFC, and Costello syndrome). I am working on understanding the impact of RAS signaling on the musculoskeletal system. I use genomic approaches to identify somatic events and modifiers in the RASopathies. I am also involved in identifying outcome measures for use in clinical trials for the associated orthopedic manifestations. Other areas of research involve vascular anomalies, Prader-Willi syndrome, and hypophosphatasia.

  • David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    The Harold K. Faber Professor of Pediatrics, Senior Associate Dean, Maternal and Child Health and Professor, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is focused on the study of the ontogeny and control of heme catabolism and bilirubin production in the developing neonate. A better understanding of the role of increased bilirubin production in neonatal jaundice and the prevention of hemolytic jaundice has remained an overall objective of our program. Thus, we are exploring the pivotal role of the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of bilirubin in the developing neonate.

  • Sarah Streett

    Sarah Streett

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio Dr. Sarah Streett is the Clinical Director of Inflammatory Bowel Disease at Stanford and is passionate about taking care of people with IBD. She is a national expert in the treating of complex IBD and is expanding our services to offer multi-disciplinary care and opportunities for clinical research participation. In 2018 she received the Champion of Hope Award from the Crohn?s and Colitis Foundation and serves on their Medical Advisory Board. Her interests are in fertility and pregnancy in people with IBD, developing precision approaches to IBD therapy, and in the role that the microbiome and diet play its pathogenesis. She is one of the investigators in the Stanford IBD Registry and has research projects focused on optimizing clinical outcomes in IBD, the role of the microbiota and diet in IBD and pregnancy and applying new technologies to individualizing therapy for IBD.

    Dr. Streett has a national leadership role in the American Gastroenterological Association, where has been Chair of the Practice Management and Economics Committee, as well as Chair of the AGA?s initiatives on Obesity. She currently serves on the Government Affairs Committee and is a special government employee at the FDA. She has represented the interests of gastroenterologists and their patients on Capitol Hill numerous times. Dr. Streett believes strongly in a collaborative approach to give patient?s personalized care based on the latest therapies for the treatment of IBD.

  • Matthew Strehlow

    Matthew Strehlow

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Strehlow's research is focused on global health and global emergency care. Working with in-country partners, he aims to identify the epidemiology of emergencies in developing countries and leverage the growth of emergency care systems in innovative ways to improve the overall health of the population. Specific examples include improving patient flow between the community and different level facilities and using emergency call center infrastructure to combat gender based violence.

  • Ashley Rene Styczynski

    Ashley Rene Styczynski

    Postdoctoral Medical Fellow, Infectious Diseases

    Bio Ashley Styczynski, MD, MPH, is an infectious disease fellow in the Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine with research interests in epidemiology, global health, emerging infections, and antimicrobial resistance. She holds an MPH from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and an MD from University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to coming to Stanford for her infectious disease fellowship, she spent two years as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. During her time as an EIS officer, Ashley conducted outbreak investigations on Zika virus, vaccinia virus, and rabies. She is currently conducting research on perinatal transmission dynamics of antimicrobial resistant organisms and sustainable interventions to reduce transmission of infections within low-resource healthcare facilities.

  • Felice Su

    Felice Su

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical pharmacology research is focused on investigating the impact of dynamic organ function on drug disposition and designing dosing strategies based on mathematical models that account for these changes in order to optimize safe medication administration in critically ill children.

    Research through the REVIVE Initiative for Resuscitation Excellence investigates the quality of resuscitation during cardiopulmonary arrest. Areas of focus include early identification during the no-flow state prior to CPR initiation and quality of CPR simulation education.

  • Leslee L.Subak, MD

    Leslee L.Subak, MD

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the association of weight and urinary incontinence (UI) in women and clinical trials to test strategies to improve outcomes in women?s genitourinary health. We have shown the independent association of weight and UI and the efficacy of weight loss to treat women with UI. I also conduct studies of epidemiology, economics and cost-effectiveness, and novel interventions for UI, sexual dysfunction, vaginal atrophy, pelvic organ prolapse and menopause symptoms.

  • Thomas Sudhof

    Thomas Sudhof

    Avram Goldstein Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Information transfer at synapses mediates information processing in brain, and is impaired in many brain diseases. Thomas Südhof is interested in how synapses are formed, how presynaptic terminals release neurotransmitters at synapses, and how synapses become dysfunctional in diseases such as autism or Alzheimer's disease. To address these questions, Südhof's laboratory employs approaches ranging from biophysical studies to the electrophysiological and behavioral analyses of mutant mice.

  • Pervez Sultan

    Pervez Sultan

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Pervez Sultan is an Associate Professor of Obstetric Anesthesiology, at Stanford University School of Medicine. He received his medical degree from the University of Edinburgh and completed the majority of his anesthetic training in Edinburgh and London, within the United Kingdom. He was also previously an Obstetric Anesthesia Fellow at Stanford, after which he completed an MD (Res) research degree exploring ?Molecular mechanisms of perioperative lymphopenia.? Subsequently Dr. Sultan has practiced as an Attending at University College London Hospital with an Honorary Faculty position (Senior Lecturer) at University College London.

    He is currently Chief Investigator for 3 funded multi-center studies and 1 funded single-center study within the United Kingdom and has multiple active International collaborative projects globally. His research interests include Obstetric Anesthesia, recovery following childbirth and peripartum immune function. He has published over 90 peer-reviewed manuscripts, book chapters and editorials. Dr. Sultan currently serves on the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology Research Committee, the International Outreach Committee in addition to SOAP Guideline Committees.

    Researchgate profile: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Pervez_Sultan2
    Google Scholar profile: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Z2ftv_IAAAAJ&hl=en
    Twitter: @PervezSultanMD

  • Yang Sun, MD, PhD

    Yang Sun, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the role of inositol phosphatases in eye development and disease, using both animal models and human disease tissue. We are a translational laboratory seeking to understand the basic function of proteins as well as developing therapeutic strategies for clinical trials.

  • Zijie Sun

    Zijie Sun

    Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We focus on understanding the molecular mechanism of transcription factors that govern the transformation of normal cells to a neoplastic state. We are especially interested in nuclear hormone action and its interactions with other signaling pathways in tumor development and progression.

  • Philip Sunshine

    Philip Sunshine

    Professor of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary interests are in the area of neonatal nutrition and developmental gastroenterology. The use of parenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants, and the introduction of early enteral feeding to stimulate gastrointestinal maturation are my specific areas of investigative endeavors.

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Bio Using and Understanding Cell-Free Biology

    Swartz Lab General Research Focus:

    The current and projected research in the Swartz lab balances basic research in microbial metabolism, protein expression, and protein folding with a strong emphasis on compelling applications. The power and versatility of cell-free methods coupled with careful evaluation and engineering of these new systems enables a whole new range of applications and scientific investigation. Fundamental research on: the mechanisms and kinetics of ribosomal function, fundamental bioenergetics, basic mechanisms of protein folding, functional genomics, and metabolic pathway analysis is motivated by a variety of near- and medium term applications spanning medicine, energy, and environmental needs.

    Swartz Lab Application Focus:

    In the medical area , current research addresses the need for patient-specific vaccines to treat cancer. Particularly for lymphomas, there is a strong need to be able to make a new cancer vaccine for each patient. Current technologies are not practical for this demanding task, but cell-free approaches are rapid and inexpensive. We have already demonstrated feasibility in mouse tumor challenge studies and are now expanding the range of applications and working to improve the relevant technologies. Experience with these vaccines has also suggested a new and exciting format for making inexpensive and very potent vaccines for general use.

    To address pressing needs for a new and cleaner energy source, we are working towards an organism that can efficiently capture solar energy and convert it into hydrogen. The first task is to develop an oxygen tolerant hydrogenase using cell-free technology to express libraries of mutated enzymes that can be rapidly screened for improved function. Even though these are very complex enzymes, we have produced active hydrogenases with our cell-free methods. We are now perfecting the screening methods for rapid and accurate identification of improved enzymes. After these new enzymes are identified, the project will progress toward metabolic engineering and bioreactor design research to achieve the scales and economies required.

    To address environmental needs, we are developing an improved water filters using an amazing membrane protein, Aquaporin Z. It has the ability to reject all other chemicals and ions except water. We have efficiently expressed the protein into lipid bilayer vesicles and are now working to cast these membranes on porous supports to complete the development of a new and powerful water purification technology. The same lessons will be applied toward the development of a new class of biosensors that brings high sensitivity and selectivity.

  • Karl Sylvester

    Karl Sylvester

    Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One of the current primary interests of the lab is to investigate the mechanisms by which hepatocellular injury and recovery is influenced and controlled by hepatocyte metabolism.

    A second focus of investigation is to identify molecular markers of human disease that provide diagnostic function, serve as targets for possible therapeutic manipulation, or provide insight into mechanisms of human disease. Specific diseases of interest include newborn sepsis and Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC).

  • Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Interventional Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transarterial administration of chemotherapeutics, radioactive microspheres, and biologics for the treatment of unresectable tumors; management of portal hypertension and complications of cirrhosis (TIPS); treatment of complications of organ transplantation; Venous and pulmonary arterial thrombolysis and reconstruction; Stent and Stent-graft treatment of peripheral vascular diseases, aneurysms, aortic dissections

  • William Talbot

    William Talbot

    Senior Associate Dean, Graduate Education & Postdoctoral Affairs and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use genetic and cellular approaches to investigate the molecular basis of glial development and myelination in the zebrafish.

  • Jean Y. Tang MD PhD

    Jean Y. Tang MD PhD

    Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on 2 main areas:

    1. Skin cancer:
    - New therapeutics to treat and prevent non-melanoma skin cancer, especially by targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway for BCC tumors
    - Genomic analysis of drug-resistant cancers
    - Identifying risk factors for skin cancer in the Women's Health Initiative

    2. Epidermolysis Bullosa: gene therapy and protein therapy to replace defective/absent Collagen 7 in children and adults with Recessive Dystrophic EB

  • Joyce Teng, MD, PhD

    Joyce Teng, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    Bio Joyce Teng, MD, PhD is a professor in dermatology at Stanford University. She is affiliated with multiple hospitals in the area, including Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH) at Stanford and Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC). She received her medical degree from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 12 years. She is one of the 5 pediatric dermatologists practicing at LPCH and one of 72 at SHC who specialize in Dermatology. She sees patients with rare genetic disorders, birthmarks, vascular anomalies and a variety of inflammatory skin diseases. She is also an experienced pediatric dermatological surgeon. Her research interests are drug discovery and novel therapy for skin disorders.

  • Mary Frances Nunez Teruel

    Mary Frances Nunez Teruel

    Assistant Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Teruel Lab uses a combination of engineering and biological approaches including high-throughput screening of RNAi and DNA construct libraries, CRISPR libraries, targeted mass spectrometry, live-cell fluorescence microscopy, and bioinformatics to investigate the systems biology of cell differentiation and tissue renegeneration, with a particular focus on uncovering the molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance, diabetes, and obesity.

  • Avnesh Thakor

    Avnesh Thakor

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Over the past decade there has been tremendous advances in the field of Interventional Oncology with the clinical utilization of multiple new innovative locoregional therapies (i.e. chemoembolization, percutaneous ablation). Looking forward, our ability to superselectively deliver new therapies such as nanoparticles, stem cells and gene therapy will open new pathways for Interventional Radiology into the emerging field of Regenerative Medicine.

  • Suzanne Tharin

    Suzanne Tharin

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The long-term goal of my research is the repair of damaged corticospinal circuitry. Therapeutic regeneration strategies will be informed by an understanding both of corticospinal motor neuron (CSMN) development and of events occurring in CSMN in the setting of spinal cord injury. MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of ?suites? of genes. The work in my lab seeks to identify microRNA controls over CSMN development and over the CSMN response to spinal cord injury.

  • Margo Thienemann

    Margo Thienemann

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Disorder

  • Robert Tibshirani

    Robert Tibshirani

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research is in applied statistics and biostatistics. I specialize in computer-intensive methods for regression and classification, bootstrap, cross-validation and statistical inference, and signal and image analysis for medical diagnosis.

  • Seda Tierney

    Seda Tierney

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Assessment of vascular health s in children by non-invasive modalities

    Echocardiography and outcomes in congenital heart disease

  • Alice Ting

    Alice Ting

    Professor of Genetics, of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We develop chemogenetic and optogenetic technologies for probing and manipulating protein networks, cellular RNA, and the function of mitochondria and the mammalian brain. Our technologies draw from enzyme engineering, directed evolution, chemical biology, organic synthesis, high-resolution microscopy, genetics, and computational analysis.

  • Katherine Travis

    Katherine Travis

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics)

    Bio Dr. Katherine Travis is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University. Dr. Travis obtained her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of California San Diego. Dr. Travis came to Stanford as a postdoctoral fellow to obtain training in clinical neuroscience and translational approaches to intervention. As part of her training, she was awarded a K99/R00 Pathway to Independence grant from the National Institutes of Health.

    Her research uses human neuroimaging and behavioral measures to examine the neural bases of early language learning in infants and young children. The goal of her research is to develop therapies and interventions to help promote language learning outcomes in children at-risk for learning disabilities. Currently, she directs an NIH-funded clinical trial that will use diffusion MRI to assess whether there are changes in brain structure following a language intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for preterm infants.

  • Jennifer Tremmel

    Jennifer Tremmel

    Susan P. and Riley P. Bechtel Medical Director and Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Tremmel studies sex differences in cardiovascular disease. Current research projects include evaluating sex differences in coronary pathophysiology, young patients presenting with myocardial infarction, the impact of stress on anginal symptoms, chronic total coronary occlusions, and vascular access site complications.

  • Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our primary interests are in the molecular underpinnings of vascular disease as well as assessing disease risk. In addition to targeted investigation of specific signaling molecules, we utilize global genomic analysis to identify gene expression networks and regulatory units. We are particularly interested in the role of microRNAs in gene expression pathways associated with disease.

  • Chi-Ho Ban Tsui

    Chi-Ho Ban Tsui

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult-MSD) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Tsui completed his medical training at Dalhousie University, Halifax, in 1995 after obtaining his Masters of Science in Pharmacy in 1991. These degrees followed a Diploma in Engineering and Bachelors of Science in both Mathematics and Pharmacy. Dr. Tsui completed his anesthesia residency training at the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton in 2000, and he received further experience in pediatric anesthesia at British Columbia Children's Hospital in Vancouver. After 16 years of practice at the University of Alberta Hospital and Stollery Children?s Hospital, Dr. Tsui was recruited to Stanford University.

    Currently, Dr. Tsui is a Medical Center Line (MCL) Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University. In his position as an adult and pediatric anesthesiologist at the Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital, he specializes in regional anesthesia techniques.

    Dr. Tsui is an avid and internationally recognized researcher in many areas of regional anesthesia. During his residency, Dr. Tsui developed an interest in improving the accuracy of epidural catheter placement and was issued a U.S. patent in relation to his research. Dr. Tsui has expanded his research into the use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia, with particular relevance to peripheral nerve block performance. Dr. Tsui is also responsible for development of the E-Catheter catheter-over-needle kit for use during peripheral nerve blocks. The primary objective of his research is to transform regional anesthesia from an ?art? into a reliable and reproducible ?science? by further exploring the basic scientific and clinical aspects of electrophysiological signal monitoring and integrating this with the latest advances in ultrasound.

    Dr. Tsui has received the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR) Clinical Scholar award and has previously received research awards and grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Canadian Anesthesiologists? Society, AHFMR, and University of Alberta. In 2015, a prestigious award, the CAS Research Recognition Award, was presented by the Canadian Anesthesiologists? Society to Dr. Tsui "in recognition of significant research contributions to regional anesthesia, acute pain management and pediatric anesthesia in Canada and around the world".

  • Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Complex behavioral and neuropsychiatric phenotypes often have a strong genetic component. This genetic component is often extremely complex and difficult to dissect. The current revolution in genome technology means that we can avail ourselves to tools that make it possible for the first time to begin understanding the complex genetic and epigenetic interactions at the basis of the human mind.

  • PJ Utz

    PJ Utz

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The long-term research goal of Utz laboratory is (1) to develop a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases by exploring signaling pathways that are activated during apoptosis; and (2) to better understand the complicated process of programmed cell death.

  • Tulio Valdez

    Tulio Valdez

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology (Pediatric) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Bio Dr. Tulio A Valdez is a surgeon scientist born and raised in Colombia with a subspecialty interest in Pediatric Otolaryngology. He attended medical school at Universidad Javeriana in Bogota Colombia before undertaking his residency in Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery in Boston. He completed his Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship at Texas Children?s Hospital (2007), Houston and obtained his Master?s in Clinical and Translational Research at the University of Connecticut.

    Clinically, Dr. Valdez has an interest in airway surgery and swallowing disorders. He has a special interest in the management of sinus disease in cystic fibrosis. Dr. Valdez has co-authored one textbook and numerous book chapters and scientific manuscripts. Dr. Valdez continues his clinical research in these areas, particularly with a focus on aerodigestive disorders.

    Scientifically, Dr. Valdez has developed various imaging methods to diagnose otitis media and cholesteatoma a middle ear condition that can lead to hearing loss. He was part of the Laser Biomedical Research Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research includes novel imaging modalities to better diagnose ear infections one of the most common pediatric problems. His research has now expanded to include better intraoperative imaging modalities in pediatric patients to improve surgical outcomes without the need for radiation exposure. 

    Dr. Valdez believes in the multi-disciplinary collaborations to tackle medical problems and has co-invented various medical devices and surgical simulation models.

  • Matt van de Rijn

    Matt van de Rijn

    Sabine Kohler, MD, Professor in Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on molecular analysis of human soft tissue tumors (sarcomas) with an emphasis on leiomyosarcoma and desmoid tumors. In addition we study the role of macrophages in range of malignant tumors.

  • Keith Van Haren, MD

    Keith Van Haren, MD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research group is dedicated to innovating care for children with degenerative brain disorders. We are particularly focused on genetic and autoimmune disorders that cause damage to the myelin (the fatty insulation around the nerves) of the brain and spinal cord. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (genetic) and multiple sclerosis (autoimmune) are the prototypical examples of degenerative disorders of myelin and are the two disorders we study most intensively.

  • Krisa Van Meurs

    Krisa Van Meurs

    Rosemarie Hess Professor in Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, hypoxic respiratory failure, inhaled nitric oxide therapy, ECMO, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, neonatal clinical trials, and the use of aEEG and NIRS to detect brain injury.

  • Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group is focused on developing new fast and quantitative MRI techniques.

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: