School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 111 Results

  • Jean Marie Batail

    Jean Marie Batail

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio I am a MD/PhD postdoctoral scholar from Rennes in France. Before arriving in Stanford, I worked in both clinical and research fields. I leaded a unit specialized in neuropsychiatric treatment resistant disorders (mainly depression, Parkinson Disease with psychiatric comorbidities and obsessive-compulsive disorder) with two residents. In this unit, I used and coordinated neuromodulations techniques such as repetititive Trancranial Magnetic Stimulation, Electroconvulsive therapy, and Deep Brain Stimulation. In the research part of my activity, my work focused on biomarkers of poor outcome of depressive disorder using clinical/neuropsychological/brain imaging assessments. In addition, I conducted research on neurofeedback applied to depression. Apart to be involved in the national coordination of this topic for psychiatric diseases (Neurofeedback section of French Association of Biological Psychiatry and Neuropsychopharmacology https://www.afpbn.org/sections/next/), I was actively involved in the development of a new generation of brain-computer interface therapies based on joint bimodal EEG-fMRI neurofeedback. In this project, I leaded the clinical research applying this new technology to depression. I am very interested in working on biomarkers of neuropsychiatric disorders and the development of personalized-targeting neuromodulation techniques.

  • Edith Brignoni Perez

    Edith Brignoni Perez

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Edith Brignoni Pérez completed her Ph.D. in Neuroscience at Georgetown University in June 2019. Her doctoral work focused on investigating the neurofunctional bases of reading in bilingual-biliterate children and adults, under the mentorship of Dr. Guinevere F. Eden at the Center for the Study of Learning. Edith used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether bilinguals rely on a different functional brain system to read words in English compared (1) to monolinguals and (2) to reading words in Spanish.

    She joined the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics research unit in July 2019 as a postdoctoral fellow under the co-mentorship of Drs. Katherine Travis (Pediatrics), Dr. Heidi Feldman (Pediatrics), and Ian Gotlib (Psychology). Some of Edith?s current research interests include how the brain?s white matter microstructure and developmental outcomes relate to one another, particularly in infants born prematurely. She is also interested in changes to brain structure and function following early intervention of language exposure, and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes relationship with early-life stress.

  • Hyesang Chang

    Hyesang Chang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research aims to understand neural representations and brain networks that support learning and academic achievement across development to bridge the gaps between cognitive and developmental science, neuroscience, and education. I am interested in the interplay between multiple cognitive and affective systems, and neuroplasticity of these systems that give rise to individual differences in how children acquire knowledge and skills in domains important for academic and professional success.

  • Samir Chowdhury

    Samir Chowdhury

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio I am an applied mathematician trained in computational topology, geometry, and data analysis. At Stanford, I am working on developing new methods for analyzing and fingerprinting neuroimaging data and in obtaining meaningful clinical insights from such analysis.

    Prior to Stanford, I completed my PhD in the Department of Mathematics at The Ohio State University under the supervision of Facundo Mémoli. My thesis was titled "Metric and Topological Approaches to Network Data Analysis".

  • John Coetzee

    John Coetzee

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am presently engaged in developing innovative treatments for traumatic brain injury in Dr. Maheen Adamson's lab at the Palo Alto VA, and for depression in the Brain Stimulation Lab at Stanford.

  • Eleanor Cole

    Eleanor Cole

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio My research has focused on differences in brain activity, structure and functional connectivity in various conditions; sensory deficits, neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions. I have experience with a range of neuroscience techniques including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electroencephalography (EEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electromyography (EMG). My PhD research focused on neural differences in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). I completed my PhD within three years; completing four research projects across three different labs, including working with a world leader in ASD research, Prof. Peter Enticott, in Melbourne, Australia. Alongside my PhD, I worked in an outpatient clinic alongside clinical psychiatrists and coordinated a multi-award winning mental health campaign. My interest in psychiatric research led me to take a postdoctoral position in the Psychiatry Department at Stanford, developing an accelerated brain stimulation therapy for adults with treatment-resistant depression and suicidal ideation. This position also involves utilizing the latest neural targeting methods for rTMS using functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI), examining neural connectivity changes associated with antidepressant responses and identifying potential biomarkers of antidepressant response. I am fully committed to a career in research, particularly research aimed at identifying the neural basis of psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders in order to both develop new treatments and improve existing treatments for mental illnesses.

  • Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eshel (he/him/his) is a psychiatrist and instructor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His clinical focus is the full-spectrum mental health care of sexual and gender minorities, with particular interest in depression, anxiety, and the complex effects of trauma in this population. He works in collaboration with other primary care and mental health providers at the new Stanford LGBTQ+ program.

    His research interests include the use of optogenetic, electrophysiological, neuroimaging, and behavioral approaches to probe the neural circuits of reward processing, decision making, and social behavior. He recently won a multi-year grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to study the neural circuits of frustration and aggression.

    Dr. Eshel has published articles on topics such as the role of dopamine in learning, the neuroscience of irritability, LGBTQ health, reward and punishment processing in depression, behavioral predictors of substance use among adolescents, and the mechanism of transcranial magnetic stimulation. His work has appeared in Nature, Science, Nature Neuroscience, Annual Review of Neuroscience, JAMA, JAMA Psychiatry, Neuropsychopharmacology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Journal of Neuroscience. He is also the author of the book Learning: The Science Inside, a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    He has delivered presentations on anger expression in patients with PTSD, the neural circuitry of learning, dopamine prediction errors, and LGBTQ-related topics at meetings of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, Society of Biological Psychiatry, and Association of American Medical Colleges, among others. He is also an associate editor of the Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health, and an ad-hoc reviewer for numerous publications including Science, JAMA Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, and Current Biology.


    Dr. Eshel has won honors for his scholarship and advocacy, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Outstanding Resident Award from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Science and SciLifeLab Grand Prize for Young Scientists, and the National LGBT Health Achievement Award.

    He is a member of the American Psychiatric Association, Society of Biological Psychiatry, Association of Gay & Lesbian Psychiatrists, Society for Neuroscience, and other professional associations. He is also an advocate for LGBTQ rights, recently serving as the LGBTQ Chair of the Stanford Graduate Medical Education Diversity Committee.

    Prior to Stanford, Dr. Eshel trained and conducted research at the National Institutes of Health, Princeton University, the World Health Organization, University College London, and Harvard University.

  • Mohsen Fathzadeh

    Mohsen Fathzadeh

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have been venturing the career of characterizing insulin resistance genes, as the underlying risk factor of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. My earlier postdoctoral fellowship at the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine involved the functional genomic of diabetes and glycemic traits loci by using deep phenotyping approach i.e., multi-OMICs and transgenic mice.
    At my current research, I am harnessing the epigenomic analysis in the global birth cohorts. I aim to unravel the origin of insulin resistance in the etiology of diabetes, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's diseases. Certain ethnicities develop insulin resistance and diabetes even with the normal weight and at younger ages. Therefore, it is essential to distinguish genes that predispose high-risk individuals to insulin resistance in the presence or absence (lipodystrophy) of obesity.
    The main plan of my research is to expand follow-up studies on the global birth cohorts from diverse ethnic groups to eventually enable precise screening. This aim is aligned with the missions of Stanford Long-Range Planning and Precision Health to diminish health disparities. Therefore, our research supports the University mission of deep phenotyping and care of diverse patients and populations. These studies have the potential to specify mechanistic and causality insights from the drivers of diabetes and insulin resistance risk in different ethnicities. The ultimate goal of my research is to pave the way for opportunities to prevent insulin resistance as early as 10-20 years before the onset of diabetes and the age-related adverse outcomes such as vascular dementia and to reduce the widening ethnic inequalities.
    My overall goal is to promote the field of global precision medicine with an eye toward the minority and under-represented communities in genomic medicine.

  • Laura Michele Hack

    Laura Michele Hack

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Laura Hack is a Postdoctoral Fellow and Clinical Instructor under the mentorship of Drs. Leanne Williams, Alan Schatzberg, and Ruth O?Hara. She is a translational clinician with a research passion for integrating multiple types of biological and environmental data using advanced analytic techniques into a neuroscience-based taxonomy of mood, anxiety, and stressor-related disorders. Laura envisions herself as a ?psychiatrist of the future,? incorporating genetic information, brain imaging, blood-based markers, and data from wearable sensors into diagnostic and treatment decisions to help relieve the suffering that arises from our current trial-and-error approach.

  • Alesha Heath

    Alesha Heath

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Dr. Alesha Heath is a Postdoctoral Scholar at Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford School of Medicine and the MIRECC the VA Palo Alto. She earned her PhD from the University of Western Australia and Sorbonne University.

    Dr. Heath's research has been primarily focused on the mechanisms and applications of brain stimulation therapies, in particular repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Her research involves both basic and clinical components with the aim of improving the efficacy of these therapies for the treatment of disorders such as depression and Alzheimer's disease.

  • John P. Hegarty II

    John P. Hegarty II

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Child Psychiatry

    Bio The overarching goal of my research is to develop objective biomarkers for individuals with psychiatric and neurological conditions in order to improve biologically-based diagnosis and advance the development of precision medicine for mental health. Biologically-based diagnosis and treatment are extremely limited for some psychiatric conditions, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but also critically-needed to increase early identification and improve treatment outcomes. My early career training has focused on developing expertise in non-invasive neuroimaging approaches for examining participants ranging from young children to adults and my research has focused on identifying the neurobiology underlying typical and atypical neurodevelopment.

    Thus far in my early research career, my primary contributions to science fall within four major categories:
    1) identifying the neural correlates of different cognitive and behavioral deficits, 2) investigating the neurobiological substrates of treatment response, 3) examining the etiological factors that contribute to atypical brain development in children with autism, and 4) summarizing and increasing accessibility to autism-related research. My earliest research investigated the neurobiology associated with the cognitive deficits of alexithymia, dyslexia, and stress to further develop theories of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to differences in cognitive and behavioral processing. My subsequent dissertation research, in which I began to focus on neurodevelopmental disorders, examined the neural correlates of treatment response to beta-blockers in adults with ASD and also assessed the contribution of cerebellar circuits to autism-related symptoms, which is well-supported from postmortem studies but understudied in clinical populations. During my postdoctoral training, I have been further developing skills for working with young children with and without neurodevelopmental disorders as well as utilizing advanced neuroimaging and neurophysiological approaches to examine the biological mechanisms underlying different types of cognitive and behavioral symptoms. My most recent research has focused on examining the neural correlates of response to behavioral interventions as well as examining the etiological factors that contribute to atypical brain development in twins with autism. The independent line of research that I will continue to develop in my research lab will aim to improve our understanding of typical and atypical brain development and identify objective biomarkers for the application of precision medicine. Overall, my track record exemplifies that I am highly dedicated to improving biologically-based treatment approaches and am uniquely-qualified to develop this line of research based on my neuroimaging expertise, incorporation of basic research findings into clinical studies, and extensive experience collaborating with clinicians and other researchers to conduct novel biological and treatment-related research in pediatric, adolescent, adult, and geriatric populations.

  • Jing Jiang

    Jing Jiang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Jing's research work focuses on the cognitive and neural mechanisms of social communication. She received her Master degree at Beijing Normal University in 2013, where she mainly studied the unique neural underpinnings of face-to-face verbal communication using fNIRS-based hyperscanning. During her Ph.D. studies at Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin in Germany from 2013 to 2017,she combined various techniques such as fMRI, MEG and eye tracking to study neural mechanisms of one important component in social interaction: eye contact.She joined the Etkin Lab in 2017 and has specifically focused on the causal neural circuitry of emotion processing in social context using TMS-fMRI.

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