School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 153 Results

  • Elias Aboujaoude, MD, MA

    Elias Aboujaoude, MD, MA

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Aboujaoude is a Clinical Professor, researcher and writer at Stanford University's Department of Psychiatry, where he is Chief of the Anxiety Disorders Section and Director of the OCD Clinic and the Impulse Control Disorders Clinic. Besides the compulsivity-impulsivity spectrum, his work has focused on the intersection of technology and psychology, with an emphasis on the problematic use of Internet-related technologies, mental health in a post-privacy world, and the potential for telemedicine interventions such as virtual reality and video-based therapy to increase access to care and advance global health. His books include "Virtually You: The Dangerous Powers of the e-Personality" and "Mental Heath in the Digital Age: Grave Dangers, Great Promise". Dr. Aboujaoude also teaches psychology on the main Stanford campus and at UC Berkeley. Scholarly and media platforms that have featured his work include The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Congressional Quarterly, The Harvard Business Review, The Chronicle of Higher Education, BBC, PBS, and CNN.

  • Sarah Adler

    Sarah Adler

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in the design and delivery of clinical care using, data and technology. I have focused on disordered eating behaviors and obesity.

  • W. Stewart Agras

    W. Stewart Agras

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research is focused on disorders of human feeding including the eating disorders: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Ongoing or recently completed studies include: A controlled trial of the implementation of interpersonal psychotherapy for eating disorders and depression on college campuses across the U.S. A multisite controlled study of two types of family therapy for the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa. Early prevemtion of overweight and obesity.

  • Raag Airan

    Raag Airan

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our goal is to develop and clinically implement new technologies for high-precision and noninvasive intervention upon the nervous system. Every few millimeters of the brain is functionally distinct, and different parts of the brain may have counteracting responses to therapy. To better match our therapies to neuroscience, we develop techniques that allow intervention upon only the right part of the nervous system at the right time, using technologies like focused ultrasound and nanotechnology.

  • Amy Alexander

    Amy Alexander

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests College Mental Health, Emotional Support Animals & Service Animals, Women's Health, Mental Health & Well-being in Veterinarians

  • Bruce Arnow, Ph.D.

    Bruce Arnow, Ph.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology - Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current research interests include treatment outcome for major depression, particularly treatment refractory and chronic forms of major depression, as well as mediators and moderators of outcome; the epidemiology of chronic pain and depression; relationships between child maltreatment and adult sequelae, including psychiatric, medical and health care utilization.

  • Sepideh Bajestan

    Sepideh Bajestan

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuropsychiatry
    Functional Neurological Symptom Disorders, Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures
    Group and Individual Psychotherapy
    Impulse Control Disorders

  • Tali Ball, PhD

    Tali Ball, PhD

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Tali Ball, PhD is the Director of the Stanford Translational Anxiety Research (STAR) Lab and an Instructor in the Stanford Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Her primary research aim is to translate neurobiologically-based models of anxiety into improved treatment outcomes. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program, where her dissertation work established relationships between brain activation during fear extinction learning and anxiety reduction following a brief exposure intervention. Her postdoctoral research focused on developing clinically useful metrics of brain circuit function and incorporating neuroscience-based assessments into clinical practice. Her work brings together clinical psychology, neuroscience, and computational approaches, always with an eye towards how the results of the science can be directly implemented in clinical practice.

  • Jacob S. Ballon

    Jacob S. Ballon

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Jacob S. Ballon, M.D., M.P.H. specializes in the treatment of people with psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. He is the Co-Director of the INSPIRE Clinic at Stanford which provides interdisciplinary care for people experiencing psychosis. He is also the medical director of H2 acute inpatient unit and the co-director of the specialty psychiatry clinics section in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Ballon completed his residency at Stanford in 2009 and a Schizophrenia Research Fellowship at Columbia University in 2011.

    INSPIRE is an innovative interdisciplinary client-centered resource providing respectful evidence-based care to support people to achieve meaningful recovery from psychosis through collaborative partnership with individuals and their families while advancing knowledge and training for a new generation of providers. With a recovery-oriented philosophy, the clinic provides an array of services including psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and psychosocial evaluations. As a research clinic, they are focused on collaborating with multiple disciplines throughout the university to conduct clinical and basic science research including functional imaging, clinical trials, basic pathophysiology, and genetics.

    Dr. Ballon maintains an interest in understanding the connections between the brain and the rest of the body as relates to the manifestation and treatment of people who experience psychosis. He co-chairs a diverse working group that brings together researchers from throughout the university and technology community to investigate these connections and look at innovative ways to combine large-scale data to elucidate new strategies for developing pathways to prevention or treatment of psychosis. He has active projects investigating the metabolic implications of schizophrenia and of psychiatric medication including the association of antipsychotic medication with weight gain and insulin resistance.

    In understanding the whole-body impact of psychiatric illness, Dr. Ballon also has an active interest in the role that exercise can play in psychiatric treatment. He co-chairs Brain-Ex, a multidisciplinary research partnership of clinical research, neuroscience, exercise physiology, and prevention medicine to build the capacity to study the impact of physical exercise on brain response, reward pathways, neuroprotection, and prevention of psychiatric disorders. This program aims to study the neurobiology of elite athletic performance, sustained exercise behavior, and the subjective experience of exercise, as well as the potential for exercise to prevent and reverse neurodegenerative psychiatric disorders. He is the site-principal investigator of an NIMH-funded clinical trial looking at the use of aerobic exercise to improve cognition in people with schizophrenia.

  • Belinda Bandstra

    Belinda Bandstra

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Belinda S. Bandstra, MD, MA, is Clinical Associate Professor, Assistant Director of Residency Training, and Chief of the General Resident Continuity Clinic in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She supervises residents in the General Clinic, Evaluation Clinic, Individual Psychotherapy Clinic and Psychosocial Treatment Clinic, in addition to maintaining a small general clinical practice of her own. Dr. Bandstra has specific interests in issues of culture in psychiatry, transitional age mental health, and mental health and wellness in academia.

    Dr. Bandstra also teaches extensively in the Adult Psychiatry Residency Training Program. She co-directs residency coursework in: Sociocultural Issues in Psychiatry; Leadership, Scholarship, and Career Development; and Essentials of Psychiatry. Dr. Bandstra is a member of the Association for Academic Psychiatry and the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training.

  • Nataly Sumarriva Beck

    Nataly Sumarriva Beck

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Beck's clinical research includes the relationship between catatonia and substance use. In addition, she works on first-episode psychosis, with a focus on treatments in the young adult population.

  • Brandon Bentzley

    Brandon Bentzley

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Brandon received his bachelors in physics from The College of New Jersey. Upon graduating he spent a year conducting plasma physics research in a joint project between Princeton University and NASA. Brandon then turned his interests to addiction neuroscience and began his training in the Medical Scientist Training Program (MD/PhD) at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). At MUSC Brandon completed his dissertation research with Gary Aston-Jones, PhD, studying the behavioral economics and neuroeconomics of drug self-administration in rats. Simultaneously, Brandon conducted clinical research on buprenorphine maintenance therapy, focusing on how patient perspectives influence treatment. Brandon is currently an instructor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. Brandon's current research interests focus on developing neurostimulation-based treatments for neuropsychiatric diseases within a neuroeconomic framework.

  • Mahendra Bhati

    Mahendra Bhati

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Bhati is a board certified neuropsychiatrist with expertise in psychiatric diagnosis, psychopharmacology, and neuromodulation. He completed postdoctoral research studying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) evoked potentials in schizophrenia and was a principle investigator for the DSM-5 academic field trials. His research experience included roles as an investigator in the first controlled clinical trials of deep brain stimulation and low field synchronized TMS for treatment of depression. His current interests include studying TMS-evoked potentials as biomarkers for neuropsychiatric disorders, augmented-reality TMS, closed-loop responsive neurostimulation for treatment of impulse and fear-related disorders, and magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound for treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder and depression.

  • KimBullock, MD

    KimBullock, MD

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Director of Virtual Reality & Immersive Techology (VR-IT) Clinic and Lab.
    Use of technology to understand the interaction of sensation, embodiment, and emotional/ behavioral regulation.
    Virtual reality treatments as a sensory modulating device to treat disorders involving body image, sensation, and control. Exploration of the use of mirrored visual feedback while inhabiting a virtual avatar to treat pain and somatic symptom related disorders.

  • Regina Casper

    Regina Casper

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Alterations in brain morphology and organization during starvation and anorexia nervosa

  • Erin Cassidy Eagle

    Erin Cassidy Eagle

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Erin Cassidy-Eagle specializes in the treatment of mental health disorders in adults and older adults. She has practiced as a Clinical Psychologist for more than 20 years. Dr. Cassidy-Eagle has a special interest in sleep, cognition and mental health of older adults.

  • Sripriya Chari

    Sripriya Chari

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Sripriya (Priya) Chari is a CA Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Clinical Assistant Professor working with the INSPIRE Clinic at Stanford. Dr. Chari's clinical interests lie in early identification of the psychosis risk syndrome and providing evidence based psychotherapeutic interventions from a recovery oriented perspective. Prior to the INSPIRE Clinic, Dr. Chari was a clinical assessor for the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study, aimed at studying the predictors for conversion to psychosis of youth at clinical high risk for psychosis. She also worked for Santa Clara County Department of Mental Health, in inpatient, outpatient, and forensic settings providing psychotherapy and assessment services.

  • Octavio Choi, MD, PhD

    Octavio Choi, MD, PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Choi is a forensic psychiatrist and clinical associate professor of psychiatry. He holds an MD in psychiatry and a PhD in neuroscience. As Training Director in the Program in Psychiatry and the Law, he is helping establish the first forensic psychiatry fellowship program at the Stanford School of Medicine. In addition, he provides consultation services for interventional psychiatrists and therapists as well as for attorneys and the court system.

    As a forensic psychiatrist, Dr. Choi specializes in neurolaw, an emerging interdisciplinary field that studies the use and misuse of neuroscience-based evidence in the courtroom. His research interests include the use of functional brain imaging to discern mental states (e.g. lie detection, pain assessment), and the neural basis for moral decision making (e.g. defects in moral reasoning brain centers giving rise to psychopathy). A central question he considers is: how do advances in our knowledge of the neural basis of behavior change perceptions of how offenders should be punished? He has testified as a court-appointed expert, as well as for the prosecution and defense, in many high-profile and complex cases involving psychiatric, neurologic, medical, and medication-related legal claims.

    Dr. Choi?s clinical interests include neuromodulatory approaches to treat psychiatric illness, such as the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to treat major depression. He is part of the interventional psychiatry group of Stanford Medicine, conducting clinical work and research to advance the power, precision, and scope of neuromodulation.

    Dr. Choi is an experienced public speaker, and has given a number of talks to lay and professional audiences on neurolaw, the neuroscience of psychopathy, and the neuroscience of moral decision-making. He is a featured TEDx speaker on the topic "Can Neuroscience Eradicate Psychopathy?"

  • Mehak Chopra

    Mehak Chopra

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Her expertise lies in treating special populations such as athletes and students. She has also had training in dealing with cultural psychiatry issues. She has been trained to treat students with a variety of mental health issues ? ADHD, Bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, eating disorders, insomnia, mood disorder and personality disorders.

  • Kate Corcoran, PhD

    Kate Corcoran, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Corcoran is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She is actively involved in teaching psychotherapy to graduate students, psychiatry residents, and postdoctoral fellows. She is the Training Director for the Clinical Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship program and the Curriculum Director of CBT Training for the Psychiatry Residency program. In her clinical practice, Dr. Corcoran specializes in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based interventions for adults experiencing anxiety, stress, and depression.

  • Francesco Nandkumar Dandekar

    Francesco Nandkumar Dandekar

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Dandekar is the Associate Director of Sports Psychiatry and a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University. After graduating summa cum laude from the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, he earned a Regent's Scholarship to complete his M.D. at UC San Diego, where he received the American Academy of Neurology?s Prize for Excellence. During his residency and fellowship at Stanford, Dr. Dandekar focused on providing care to elite athletes and students utilizing a combination of lifestyle changes (sleep, nutrition, recovery), medication management, and psychotherapy. Teamed with Dr. Noordsy, he helped to incorporate psychiatric services into Stanford's sports psychology program, and continues to see elite athletes as part of the Sports Psychiatry clinic. He is an avid tennis fan and enjoys training and competing in leagues and tournaments.

  • Beth Darnall

    Beth Darnall

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult Pain) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry & Psychology (Adult)) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Stanford Pain Relief Innovations Lab is dedicated to better characterizing and treating pain. My specific interests: (1) expand and scale access to behavioral medicine for acute and chronic pain via digital and brief treatments; (2) reduce need for opioids and associated risks; (3) reduce pain and its negative impacts via behavioral medicine; (4) train physicians and care providers on behavioral pain medicine principles and therapeutic engagement to enhance patient outcomes.

  • Smita Das

    Smita Das

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Smita Das, MD, PhD, MPH is Board Certified in Psychiatry, Addiction Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine. Dr. Das studied Chemistry and Statistics at Stanford, completed her Masters in Public Health at Dartmouth College, and then completed her MD/PhD in Community Health at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. She completed psychiatry residency and was chief resident at Stanford followed by an addiction psychiatry fellowship at UCSF. She has 20 years of experience in research in healthcare quality and addiction. Dr. Das has an appointment to the APA Addiction Council. She has been a leader in the Northern California Psychiatric Society since 2012 and is now President of the APA District Branch. Prior to her position as Medical Director of Psychiatry at Lyra Health, Dr. Das was Director of Addiction Treatment Services at the Palo Alto VA. In addition to her work at Lyra, Dr. Das practices in addictions at Stanford School of Medicine where she is a Clinical Assistant Professor.

  • Sallie De Golia

    Sallie De Golia

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. De Golia specializes in the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders with an expertise in time-limited dynamic psychotherapy. She is Section Chief of the Assessment Clinics and Director of the Evaluation Clinic. Dr. De Golia is the Associate Chair for Clinician Educator Professional Development where she is involved in developing faculty development programs including mentorship. She is also the Associate Residency Director of the Adult Psychiatry Residency Program where she has been involved in educational programming and curricular development. She is a Peer Teaching Coach in the Stanford Teaching and Mentoring Academy, teaches regularly with the Stanford Center for Faculty Development, and is a Senior Fellow at Stanford's Center for Innovation in Global Health. She currently serves on the Executive Committee of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training.

  • Charles DeBattista

    Charles DeBattista

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology - Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Treatment resistant depression.

    Novel biological interventions in the treatment of mental illness.

    Anti-glucocorticoid drugs in the treatment of mood disorders.

    Augmentation strategies in the treatment of depression.

  • Huiqiong Deng, MD, PhD

    Huiqiong Deng, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Huiqiong Deng is a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry. In addition to a medical degree, she earned a PhD, with a major in rehabilitation science and a minor in neuroscience. Specializing in the treatment of alcohol/substance addiction, interventional, and cultural psychiatry, her goal is to help each patient along the journey to achieve optimal health and quality of life.

    As the co-author of more than a dozen scholarly articles, Dr. Deng?s work has appeared in Psychiatry Research, Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, American Journal on Addictions, Brain Stimulation, and other publications.

    Dr. Deng has won numerous honors and awards such as the National Institute on Drug Abuse Young Investigator Travel Award, the Ruth Fox Scholarship from the American Society of Addiction Medicine, and College on the Problems of Drug Dependence Travel Award for Early Career Investigators. In addition, she was selected to attend the Annual American Psychiatry Association Research Colloquium for Junior Investigators. Since she joined faculty at Stanford, Dr. Deng has received research grant support by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Innovator Grant Program.

  • Katherine Eisen

    Katherine Eisen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eisen is a Clinical Assistant Professor and CA Licensed Clinical Psychologist working with the INSPIRE Clinic at Stanford. Her research and clinical interest center on therapeutic interventions that support recovery for individuals living with serious mental illness, in particular for individuals with psychosis. Dr. Eisen received her bachelor?s degree from Cornell University, and her PhD from the University of Connecticut, and completed postdoctoral training at Stanford University. Before coming to the INSPIRE Clinic, Dr. Eisen worked for over 10 years as a psychologist on the acute inpatient units at Stanford Health Care. Dr. Eisen is trained in CBT for psychosis (CBTp) and has worked with colleagues to train therapists, nursing and multidisciplinary staff, medical students, and residents to integrate CBTp informed, recovery-oriented approaches into their work with individuals with psychosis. She provides both individual and group-based cognitive behavioral therapy.

  • Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eshel (he/him/his) is a psychiatrist and instructor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His clinical focus is the full-spectrum mental health care of sexual and gender minorities, with particular interest in depression, anxiety, and the complex effects of trauma in this population. He works in collaboration with other primary care and mental health providers at the new Stanford LGBTQ+ program.

    His research interests include the use of optogenetic, electrophysiological, neuroimaging, and behavioral approaches to probe the neural circuits of reward processing, decision making, and social behavior. He recently won a multi-year grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to study the neural circuits of frustration and aggression.

    Dr. Eshel has published articles on topics such as the role of dopamine in learning, the neuroscience of irritability, LGBTQ health, reward and punishment processing in depression, behavioral predictors of substance use among adolescents, and the mechanism of transcranial magnetic stimulation. His work has appeared in Nature, Science, Nature Neuroscience, Annual Review of Neuroscience, JAMA, JAMA Psychiatry, Neuropsychopharmacology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Journal of Neuroscience. He is also the author of the book Learning: The Science Inside, a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    He has delivered presentations on anger expression in patients with PTSD, the neural circuitry of learning, dopamine prediction errors, and LGBTQ-related topics at meetings of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, Society of Biological Psychiatry, and Association of American Medical Colleges, among others. He is also an associate editor of the Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health, and an ad-hoc reviewer for numerous publications including Science, JAMA Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, and Current Biology.


    Dr. Eshel has won honors for his scholarship and advocacy, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Outstanding Resident Award from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Science and SciLifeLab Grand Prize for Young Scientists, and the National LGBT Health Achievement Award.

    He is a member of the American Psychiatric Association, Society of Biological Psychiatry, Association of Gay & Lesbian Psychiatrists, Society for Neuroscience, and other professional associations. He is also an advocate for LGBTQ rights, recently serving as the LGBTQ Chair of the Stanford Graduate Medical Education Diversity Committee.

    Prior to Stanford, Dr. Eshel trained and conducted research at the National Institutes of Health, Princeton University, the World Health Organization, University College London, and Harvard University.

  • Lief Ericsson Fenno

    Lief Ericsson Fenno

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio I am a Psychiatrist with the Addiction Medicine Consult Service at Stanford Hospital, managing mental healthcare treatment of diverse patient populations. I am also a bench scientist working at the intersection of basic neuroscience research and bioengineering to design, construct, validate, and apply novel molecular and viral tools to understand the brain in health and disease.

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