School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 41 Results

  • Bing Melody Zhang

    Bing Melody Zhang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main research interests lie in the following areas:

    1) Using genetic/genomic approaches to study the genotype-phenotype correlation of inherited non-malignant hematologic disorders, especially platelet disorders.
    2) Development and application of molecular assays for clinical testing to support hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and solid organ transplantation.
    3) NGS-based TCR/Ig clonality/MRD diagnostic testing.
    4) HLA-related disease association and pharmacogenetic testing.

  • Niushen Zhang

    Niushen Zhang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Niushen Zhang specializes in the treatment of headache and facial pain. Dr. Zhang has a special interest in complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of headaches and facial pain. She is the Director of the Headache Fellowship Program at Stanford.

  • Heng Zhao

    Heng Zhao

    Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab is focused on developing novel therapeutic methods against stroke using rodent models. We study protective effect of postconditioning, preconditioning and mild hypothermia. The rationale for studying three means of neuroprotection is that we may discover mechanisms that these treatments have in common. Conversely, if they have differing mechanisms, we will be able to offer more than one treatment for stroke and increase a patient’s chance for recovery.

  • Maisa Ziadni, PhD

    Maisa Ziadni, PhD

    Instructor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Development and testing of novel interventions for chronic pain.
    Understanding mechanisms of treatment among patients with chronic with pain.
    Understanding predictors of opioid use among patients with chronic pain.

  • Thomas Zikos

    Thomas Zikos

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio I am initially a Pittsburgh, PA native, but have been at Stanford University since 2012 for residency, fellowship, and now as faculty. It is exciting to be affiliated with one of the most dynamic and innovative medical institutions worldwide.

    My clinical and research interests focus on functional, motility, and esophageal disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Outside of this sub-sub specialization, a significant portion of my practice is also devoted to the care of a broad range of ?general gastroenterology? concerns.

    Functional, motility, esophageal, and general gastroenterology disorders are very common, and can cause significant disability. Some examples include irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic nausea, chronic constipation, achalasia, and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Despite the common nature of these disorders, many are not well understood, leading to frustration among both patients and clinicians alike. Furthermore, there is an incorrect stigma associated with some of these disorders that ?it is all in your head.? On the opposite side of the spectrum, there is sometimes an incorrect assumption that we will be able to pinpoint an exact underlying cause in all cases, but this is not possible with current technology. We aim to bridge this gap using the latest diagnostic testing and treatment paradigms, as well as a healing hand. Additionally, our group is actively engaged in multiple research projects and studies to drive the future of the field.

    Though I am early in my career, I am hoping that by the end the field will look nothing like it does today. I am hopeful, and I believe that we can revolutionize the field to better characterize gastrointestinal disorders, and come up with highly effective targeted treatments.

  • Paul Zolkind

    Paul Zolkind

    Clinical Instructor, Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery Divisions

    Bio Dr. Zolkind is originally from New York. He completed an otolaryngology residency training at Washington University in Saint Louis. He is currently the Head and Neck Surgery/Microvascular Fellow at Stanford University. His clinical interests include cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, thyroid and salivary glands as well as complex reconstruction of the head and neck. His research interests include immunotherapy approaches for head and neck cancer. Outside the hospital he enjoys spending time with his family and friends, biking, running and hiking

  • Andrew Zolopa

    Andrew Zolopa

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Zolopa’s research applies a variety of clinical epidemiologic methods in an effort to optimize antiretroviral therapy and understand the impact of drug resistance on response to ARV. Areas of focus include the clinical application of resistance testing in optimizing antiretroviral therapy, clinical cohorts, trials of antiretroviral therapies and population-based epidemiologic evaluation of HIV resistance and efficacy of ARV therapy. More recently studies focused on premature aging in HIV.

  • James Zou

    James Zou

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My group works on both foundations of statistical machine learning and applications in biomedicine and healthcare. We develop new technologies that make ML more accountable to humans, more reliable/robust and reveals core scientific insights.

    We want our ML to be impactful and beneficial, and as such, we are deeply motivated by transformative applications in biotech and health. We collaborate with and advise many academic and industry groups.

  • J. Bradley Zuchero

    J. Bradley Zuchero

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Glia are a frontier of neuroscience, and overwhelming evidence from the last decade shows that they are essential regulators of all aspects of the nervous system. The Zuchero Lab aims to uncover how glial cells regulate neural development and how their dysfunction contributes to diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and in injuries like stroke.

    Although glia represent more than half of the cells in the human brain, fundamental questions remain to be answered. How do glia develop their highly specialized morphologies and interact with neurons to powerfully control form and function of the nervous system? How is this disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases and after injury? By bringing cutting-edge cell biology techniques to the study of glia, we aim to uncover how glia help sculpt and regulate the nervous system and test their potential as novel, untapped therapeutic targets for disease and injury.

    We are particularly interested in myelin, the insulating sheath around neuronal axons that is lost in diseases like MS. How do oligodendrocytes- the glial cell that produces myelin in the central nervous system- form and remodel myelin, and why do they fail to regenerate myelin in disease? Our current projects aim to use cell biology and neuroscience approaches to answer these fundamental questions. Ultimately we hope our work will lead to much-needed therapies to promote remyelination in patients.

  • Evan Zucker

    Evan Zucker

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology - Pediatric Radiology

    Bio Dr. Zucker is a board-certified pediatric and cardiovascular radiologist with a special interest in CT and MRI for congenital heart disease.

  • Donna Zulman

    Donna Zulman

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Improving care and supporting self-management for patients with multiple chronic conditions
    - Designing and evaluating innovative health care delivery models for complex and costly patients
    - Optimizing health-related technology to personalize and improve care for complex patients and their caregivers

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: