School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 93 Results

  • Samuel Ricardo Saenz

    Samuel Ricardo Saenz

    Casual - Non-Exempt, Psych/General Psychiatry and Psychology (Adult)

    Bio Sam Saenz received his MD degree from UC Irvine and MPH from UC Berkeley before returning to his alma mater for psychiatry residency. His research focus is mental health disparities impacting Latino populations. His career interests include social determinants of health, community psychiatry, and addiction psychiatry.

  • Debra Safer

    Debra Safer

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests include the nature and treatment of eating disorders
    (particularly bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder), the development and treatment of obesity, and the development and treatment of problematic eating patterns in patients following bariatric surgery.

  • Manish Saggar

    Manish Saggar

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The overarching goal of my research is to develop reliable computational methods that will allow for characterizing and modeling temporal dynamics of brain activity, without averaging data in either space or time. I firmly believe that the spatiotemporal richness in brain activity might hold the key to finding the person- and disorder-centric biomarkers. I am currently developing methods to model the temporal dynamics of brain activity in individuals with fragile X syndrome and healthy controls.

  • Ahmad Salehi Najaf Abadi

    Ahmad Salehi Najaf Abadi

    Adjunct Professor, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio Dr. Salehi is a neurobiologist working on identifying molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome. In this process, ?he uses pre-clinical experiments to test the effects of already-approved drugs in improving cognitive function in the mouse models with hippocampal degeneration. In 2010, he received the World Technology Award for the innovative use of mouse models of Down syndrome to identify genes responsible for cognitive disabilities. Recently, he found that increasing beta2 adrenergic signaling would improve cognitive function in a mouse model of Down syndrome. Accordingly, in a collaborative study, he is testing whether already-approved beta2-adrenergic receptor agonists can indeed improve cognitive function and reduce the severity of pathology in individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer?s disease.

    Selected Publications

    Dang V, Medina B, Das D, Moghadam S, Martin KJ, Lin B, Naik P, Patel D, Nosheny R, Wesson Ashford J, Salehi A. Formoterol, a long-acting ?2 adrenergic agonist, improves cognitive function and promotes dendritic complexity in a mouse model of Down syndrome. Biol Psychiatry. 2014 Feb 1;75(3):179-88. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2013.05.024. PMID: 23827853

    Salehi A, Faizi M, Colas D, Valletta J, Laguna J, Takimoto-Kimura R, Kleschevnikov A, Wagner SL, Aisen P, Shamloo M, Mobley WC. Restoration of norepinephrine-modulated contextual memory in a mouse model of Down syndrome. Sci Transl Med. 2009 Nov 18;1(7):7ra17. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3000258.? ?PMID: 20368182
    Salehi A, Delcroix JD, Belichenko PV, Zhan K, Wu C, Valletta JS, Takimoto-Kimura R, Kleschevnikov AM, Sambamurti K, Chung PP, Xia W, Villar A, Campbell WA, Kulnane LS, Nixon RA, Lamb BT, Epstein CJ, Stokin GB, Goldstein LS, Mobley WC. Increased App expression in a mouse model of Down's syndrome disrupts NGF transport and causes cholinergic neuron degeneration. Neuron. 2006 Jul 6;51(1):29-42.? ?PMID: 16815330

    Salehi A, Delcroix JD, Belichenko PV, Zhan K, Wu C, Valletta JS, Takimoto-Kimura R, Kleschevnikov AM, Sambamurti K, Chung PP, Xia W, Villar A, Campbell WA, Kulnane LS, Nixon RA, Lamb BT, Epstein CJ, Stokin GB, Goldstein LS, Mobley WC.Increased App expression in a mouse model of Down's syndrome disrupts NGF transport and causes cholinergic neuron degeneration.
    Neuron. 2006 Jul 6;51(1):29-42.

    Links:
    Lab: www.ahmadsalehi.info
    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ahmadsalehi1/
    Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Wr3FcsEAAAAJ&hl=en

  • Katherine Sanborn

    Katherine Sanborn

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr Katherine Sanborn specializes in the treatment of psychiatric inpatients. She has practiced Psychiatry for more than 15 years. Dr. Sanborn has a special interests in residency education, psychotherapy training, administration and developmental psychopathology.

  • Gisela Sandoval

    Gisela Sandoval

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research

    Bio Dr. Gisela Sandoval is a physician scientist with dual board certification who specializes in medical-psychiatric illness caring for individuals that suffer from medical conditions at the interface of medicine and psychiatry, which often requires complex chronic care. In addition she treats children with a broad range of psychiatric disorders including neurodevelopmental disorders, ADHD and mood and anxiety disorders in adolescents. She has a thorough and comprehensive way to approach her patients; she considers not only the clinical symptoms but also the impact of the family structure and the functioning of the child at school. Dr. Sandoval has a special interest in establishing standard of care guidelines to address the needs of chronically ill children to promote healthy habits and medical treatment compliance that promote health and decrease the burden of chronic medical and psychiatric illness.
    Dr. Sandoval graduated with honors from the California Institute of Technology where she performed research in brain physiology and evolution. She earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School where she also completed a Ph.D. specializing in molecular neurobiology and genetics. Dr. Sandoval completed her residency in general psychiatry at the University of Chicago, during which she received the NIMH Outstanding Resident Award. She went on to complete a fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency of Columbia and Cornell Universities. After training she became the Clinical Director of the Warren Wright Adolescent Center at Northwestern University developing a successful clinical program focused on early identification and intervention for adolescents at risk of mental illness before moving to Stanford.
    Dr. Sandoval scientific interests focus on understanding the molecular, neurophysiological and neural circuits that are responsible for healthy brain development and behavior and understanding how these are altered in the developmental neuropsychiatric disorders resulting in pathological behaviors with the expectation that that could lead to new treatments. Furthermore, she is interested in identifying quantifiable metrics of behavior to better diagnosis mental illness by exploring the use of physical activity monitors to help assess the effectiveness of medical therapies.

  • Vidushi Savant

    Vidushi Savant

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neural networks and AI for behavioral health applications

  • Blake K. Scanlon, Ph.D.

    Blake K. Scanlon, Ph.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) [Vapahcs], Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio The overarching aim of Dr. Scanlon?s research is to develop and evaluate low-cost, pragmatic and clinically translatable methods for improving management of neurodegenerative disease and dementia. To that end, the Caregiver Technology Division of the Scanlon Lab aims to enhance patient- and family-centered care through novel, broadly customizable, and highly scalable caregiver interventions. In parallel, the Neurodegenerative Division of the Scanlon Lab focuses on the development and application of cognitive, neuropsychiatric, and biological markers for the initiation and progression of neurodegeneration.

    Dr. Scanlon received his bachelor?s degree in Neuroscience and doctorate in Clinical Health Psychology from the University of Miami. After concluding his clinical internship in Geropsychology/Neuropsychology at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS), he completed fellowships in Aging and Dementia at Stanford University School of Medicine and VAPAHCS. Dr. Scanlon is currently a VA Career Development Awardee in the Sierra-Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) and Stanford/VA Aging Clinical Research Center where his work focuses on developing and evaluating low-cost, pragmatic and clinically translatable methods for improving management of neurodegenerative disease and dementia. He also serves as Co-Director of the Stanford/VA California Alzheimer's Disease Center, Chair of the VAPAHCS Dementia Committee, and Co-Chair of the Department of Veterans Affairs VISN 21 Dementia Committee.

  • Alan F. Schatzberg

    Alan F. Schatzberg

    Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Biological bases of depressive disorders;, glucocorticoid/dopamine interactions in delusional depression;, pharmacologic treatment of depressive disorders.

  • Mariana Schmajuk

    Mariana Schmajuk

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Mariana Schmajuk received her medical school education at Boston University School of Medicine in 2012. She completed her General Adult Psychiatry Residency program Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York in 2016, serving as Chief Resident with a focus on the early transition from medical school to residency. She went on to complete her Consult-Liaison fellowship at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Columbia University Medical Center in 2017.

    Dr. Schmajuk joined Stanford University CLP team in 2017. She is a primary member of the emergency medicine consultations, working collaboratively with a nurse practioner, social worker and residents. Clinically, Dr. Schmajuk focuses on treating patients with terminal neurological disorders and oncological processes. Dr. Schmajuk is the director of the Psychosomatic Continuity clinic where residents and fellows are able to assess and longitudinally treat patients with psychiatric sequela in the context of complex medical illness. She has a particular interest in brief psychotherapeutic interventions. She enjoys teaching medical students about CL psychiatry and interviewing skills. At present, Dr. Schmajuk is using techniques of applied improvisation to educate psychiatry residents and others about the building blocks of communication. She also is an active member of the bioethics committee.

  • Logan Schneider

    Logan Schneider

    Staff, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests From a research perspective, my long-term career plan is to refine the understanding of normal and dysfunctional sleep, much like the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) and Epi4K are doing for the enigmatic epilepsies. Insufficient sleep has been deemed a public health problem with poorly understood behavioral and physiologic sleep disorders lying at the core of the issue. I am currently using well-defined distinct and objective phenotypes (e.g. periodic limb movements, hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy) to acquire the analytic skills necessary to expand my knowledge of both signal processing and genetics, with the former enhancing my ability to identify and/or refine sleep phenotypes, and the latter facilitating the pathophysiological understanding of these phenotypes. As a consequence of a better link between symptoms/phenotypes, physiology, and genetic risks, more personally targeted and effective therapeutics can be developed to address the enriched spectrum of sleep disorders.

  • Michael Schneider

    Michael Schneider

    Adjunct Professor, Psych/General Psychiatry and Psychology (Adult)

    Bio Bret Schneider specializes in brain neuromodulation technologies for interventional psychiatry, neurology and regenerative medicine. He has designed, built and tested more than one hundred medical instruments, from computerized surgical navigation systems to implantable devices and biologics. As a technology company leader, he has founded and built several start-ups, including venture-capital-backed Cervel Neurotech Inc. Bret earned a BA cum laude from Washington University in St. Louis, an MD degree from Rush University in Chicago, and graduated a clinical residency in Psychiatry at UCLA. He subsequently completed a post-doctoral fellowship in neurosurgical stereotactic radiosurgery and a post-doctoral fellowship in Advanced Psychiatry, both at Stanford University. Presently, he is Chief Medical Officer for Zap Surgical Systems, Inc., where he is developing stereotactic radiosurgery as a method for precise, non-destructive, non-invasive modulation of dysfunctional brain circuits. Bret is also Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosurgery at Stanford University. He maintains a clinical medical practice focused on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS).

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