School of Medicine


Showing 1-30 of 30 Results

  • SaradaSakamuri, MD

    SaradaSakamuri, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Sarada Sakamuri specializes in neuromuscular medicine. Her interests are in peripheral nerve injury, neuromuscular ultrasound, EMG/NCS, neurogenetic disorders, clinical research, and medical education.

    Dr. Sakamuri studied psychology at Rutgers University and she graduated with Phi Beta Kappa distinction. She obtained her medical degree from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, where she lead multiple community service and medical education activities and was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha and Gold Humanism Honor Societies. She moved to the Bay Area to pursue neurology residency at Stanford and later served as chief resident. She then completed two years of fellowship in EMG/Clinical Neurophysiology and Neuromuscular Medicine and research training at Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center.

    She serves as the Co-Director of the Center for Peripheral Nerve Surgery along with neurosurgeon Dr. Thomas J. Wilson. She performs advanced evaluations of peripheral nerve conditions by integrating nerve and muscle ultrasound and neurophysiologic testing (EMG/NCS) at the bedside. She has advanced training and particular interest in ultrasound, and sits on the Neuromuscular Ultrasound Committee of the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM).

    She is board-certified in Neurology and Neuromuscular disorders by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN). She is certified in EMG/NCS by the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (ABEM).

    Dr. Sakamuri's other passion is medical education. She is the Associate Director of the Stanford Neuromuscular Medicine and Clinical Neurophysiology/EMG Fellowships. She supervises a weekly neurology resident continuity clinic and enjoys leading teaching sessions for neurology and physiatrist residents and medical students. She has also served as a clinical instructor at Jagiellonian University Medical College in Poland, and as a teaching fellow at Stanford School of Medicine.

  • Cynthia Harryman Samos

    Cynthia Harryman Samos

    CIRM Project Manager, Neurosurgery

    Current Role at Stanford Project Manager and Writer/Editor for the Department of Neurosurgery

  • Robert Sapolsky

    Robert Sapolsky

    John A. and Cynthia Fry Gunn Professor and Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuron death, stress, gene therapy

  • Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical interests involve inpatient and outpatient care of patients with neurovascular diseases, mostly ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. I have a particular interest in cervical artery dissection, non-atherosclerotic vasculopathies, and stroke in the young.

  • Mehrdad Shamloo

    Mehrdad Shamloo

    Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The ultimate goal of the Shamloo laboratory is to rapidly advance our understanding of brain function at the molecular, cellular, circuit and behavioral levels, and to elucidate the pathological process underlying malfunction of the nervous system following injury and neurologic disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson?s disease, and autism. We have been focusing on the noradrenergic system and approaches leading to restoration of brain adrenergic signaling in these disorders.

  • Rajat S. Shivacharan

    Rajat S. Shivacharan

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neurosurgery

    Bio Rajat S. Shivacharan, Ph.D. is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Neurosurgery sponsored by Dr. Casey H. Halpern (Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery). He received his B.S. in Bioengineering from the University of Maryland in 2013. He went on to earn his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University in May 2019 in the laboratory of Dr. Dominique M. Durand (Director of Neural Engineering Center), studying the role of endogenous electric fields, or ephaptic coupling, in the recruitment of self-propagating, non-synaptic hippocampal waves under pathophysiological conditions. Now, he investigates the role of neuromodulation for neuropsychiatric indications, specifically mechanistic neurophysiology and closed-loop (or responsive) deep brain stimulation (DBS), to improve current neuromodulation therapies for mental disorders with loss of control. Outside of the lab, Rajat likes to cook (or attempt to cook) different types of cuisine, play video games, and enjoys exploring the beautiful Bay Area through biking, hiking, and camping/offroading with his Jeep.

  • LawrenceShuer, MD

    LawrenceShuer, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have clinical research interests in the surgical treatment of epilepsy. I am also interested in new developments in the treatment of craniosynostosis a congenital abnormality of infant's skulls

  • Gerald Silverberg

    Gerald Silverberg

    Professor of Neurosurgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Age-related changes in the blood-brain barrier (BBB)and on CSF dynsmics decrease the clearance of toxic metabolites, such as amyloid beta peptides (A-betas), from the brain. I am studing the effects of aging and hydrocephalus on the BBB receptors that transport A-betas and on the formation and bulk flow of CSF.

  • Harminder Singh, M.D.

    Harminder Singh, M.D.

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Minimally Invasive Cranial and Spinal Surgery, Endoscopic Keyhole Surgery

  • Stephen Skirboll

    Stephen Skirboll

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on screening strategies to identify and characterize cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human gliomas. We are pursuing this in several ways: 1) a novel colony-forming antibody live cell array to identify distinct CSC surface phenotypes, 2) RNAi screens to identify kinases critical for CSC tumorigenicity, 3) high throughput small molecule and chemical screens to identify compounds that selectively kill or target CSCs, and 4) identifying CSCs using the tumor specific EGFRvIII

  • Ivan Soltesz

    Ivan Soltesz

    James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences

    Bio Ivan Soltesz received his doctorate in Budapest and conducted postdoctoral research at universities at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, in 1995. He became full Professor in 2003, and served as department Chair from 2006 to July 2015. He returned to Stanford in 2015 as the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His major research interest is focused on neuronal microcircuits, network oscillations, cannabinoid signaling and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy.
    His laboratory employs a combination of closely integrated experimental and theoretical techniques, including closed-loop in vivo optogenetics, paired patch clamp recordings, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from identified interneurons in awake mice, 2-photon imaging, machine learning-aided 3D video analysis of behavior, video-EEG recordings, behavioral approaches, and large-scale computational modeling methods using supercomputers. He is the author of a book on GABAergic microcircuits (Diversity in the Neuronal Machine, Oxford University Press), and editor of a book on Computational Neuroscience in Epilepsy (Academic Press/Elsevier). He co-founded the first Gordon Research Conference on the Mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and epilepsy, and taught for five years in the Ion Channels Course at Cold Springs Harbor. He has over 30 years of research experience, with over 20 years as a faculty involved in the training of graduate students (total of 16, 6 of them MD/PhDs) and postdoctoral fellows (20), many of whom received fellowship awards, K99 grants, joined prestigious residency programs and became independent faculty.

  • Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical and research interests focus on the development of new radiation techniques involving stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant and benign tumors of the brain and spine, as well as functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia.

  • Sergey Stavisky

    Sergey Stavisky

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I'm trying to restore movement and communication -- and thus, independence -- to people with paralysis. To do so, I'm discovering ways to use neurotechnology to allow people to communicate far more information from their brain to the outside world.

    One branch of my brain-computer interface research is to read out complex (high degree-of-freedom) arm movement commands from motor areas of cortex, so that patients can make dextrous movements with, for example, a robotic arm. The goal is to provide enough range of movement that people can perform essential activities of daily living and take care of themselves.

    A second branch is to build speech brain-computer interfaces by decoding the neural signals associated with trying to talk. More specifically, I'm trying to reconstruct speech from the movement commands that the brain would normally send to the lips, tongue, jaw, etc. Most work in this space has been using electrocorticography, whereas I'm using electrodes that go into the brain, where we can potentially access more information thanks to the ability to detect individual neurons' action potentials.

    My Ph.D. research spanned both fundamental motor neuroscience and applied neural engineering. On the basic science side, I investigated 1) how "internal models" of how the brain's output effects the arm are used by motor cortex. 2) how sensory information carrying information about movement errors is prevented from interfering with motor cortical output until it is "ready" to generate the appropriate output; and 3) how the dynamical rules governing motor cortical activity restrict the kinds of outputs it can generate for the purpose of commanding a neural prosthesis.

    My Ph.D. neural engineering work focused on 1) how to robustly decode a user's intended movement despite minute-by-minute and day-to-day changes in neural signals, and 2) sensors' gradually losing the ability to record neuronal action potential. I also studied (3) the effect of ongoing sensory feedback on this signal, and how we can exploit this information to detect and automatically correct for errors.

  • Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Bernard and Ronni Lacroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor in Neurosurgery and Neurosciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory investigates the pathophysiology and treatment of cerebral ischemia, and methods to restore neurologic function after stroke. Treatment strategies include brain hypothermia, stem cell transplantation and optogenetic stimulation. Our clinical research develops innovative surgical, endovascular and radiosurgical approaches for treating difficult intracranial aneurysms, complex vascular malformations and occlusive disease, including Moyamoya disease, as well as stem cell transplant.

  • Eric S Sussman, MD

    Eric S Sussman, MD

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary academic interest is to expand the scope of precision medicine in cerebrovascular neurosurgery. Specifically, I utilize advanced neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and proteomics and metabolomics in order to optimize and personalize the clinical management of patients with hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke. In addition, I utilize large institutional and national databases to advance clinical outcomes following cerebrovascular insults, and to clarify how improvements in systems-based practices can improve the quality and value of care for cerebrovascular patients.

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