School of Medicine


Showing 1-7 of 7 Results

  • Jonathan P. Palma

    Jonathan P. Palma

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Interventional informatics to achieve examples of a learning healthcare system; optimization of commercial EMRs to support complex clinical workflows in newborn intensive care; clinical decision support; real-time clinical dashboards; electronic sign-out tools; IT-supported patient/family communication.

  • Anca M. Pasca, MD

    Anca M. Pasca, MD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The research focus of the lab is to understand molecular mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental disorders associated with premature birth, neonatal and fetal brain injury with the long-term goal of translating the lab?s findings into therapeutics. The research team employs a multidisciplinary approach involving genetics, molecular and developmental neurobiology, animal models and neural cells differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In particular, the lab is using a powerful 3D human brain-region specific organoid system developed at Stanford (Nature Methods, 2015; Nature Protocols, 2018) to ask questions about brain injury during development.

    https://www.neopascalab.org/

  • Laura Peterson

    Laura Peterson

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in the neonatal immune system, particularly the immune system of premature infants, and how it impacts the short and longterm health of this vulnerable population.

  • Lance Prince

    Lance Prince

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Bio Lawrence (Lance) S. Prince, MD, PhD, is the Division Chief for Neonatal and Developmental Medicine at Stanford School of Medicine. Dr. Prince was previously a Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of the Division of Neonatology at the University of California, San Diego and Rady Children?s Hospital, San Diego.

    Dr. Prince has a long and distinguished career mentoring clinical and scientific trainees and students, many of whom have gone on to establish their own successful careers as academic physician investigators. As a physician scientist, Dr. Prince leads a basic science laboratory focusing on the mechanisms regulating developmental immunology and lung injury and repair. Dr. Prince received a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from University of Miami, an MD/PhD with a focus in Cell Biology from University of Alabama at Birmingham, and postdoctoral fellowship, Pediatrics residency, and Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship training at the University of Iowa. Before arriving in California, Dr. Prince was an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University.

    Dr. Prince?s research interests include the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling lung development and the maturation of the fetal and neonatal immune systems. He has a particular clinical interest in managing and treating neonatal lung diseases, especially bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in babies born extremely preterm. Dr. Prince?s research team focuses primarily on the development of innate immunity during fetal life as it impacts health and disease in preterm infants. The laboratory is investigating how microbes including Group B streptococcus exploit the unique features of neonatal macrophages to avoid immune detection and cause disease, as well as leading a number of clinical and translational investigations.

  • Jochen Profit

    Jochen Profit

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Funded by NIH R01 grants:

    1) Development and application of composite measure of NICU quality - Baby-MONITOR

    2) High reliability, safety culture and caregiver resilience as modifiers of care quality

    3) Modifiable racial/ethnic disparities in quality of care delivery

    4) Effectiveness of regionalized care delivery systems for preterm newborns

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: