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  • Melissa Mavers

    Melissa Mavers

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio I am a physician scientist at Stanford University/Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital, with a clinical and research focus in stem cell transplantation. Prior training includes earning MD and PhD degrees through the combined program at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, where I investigated the role of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production and treating inflammatory diseases. This project led to the publication of two first-author peer-reviewed articles, several middle-author publications, and a significant review article. I subsequently completed Pediatrics residency at the University of California Los Angeles/Mattel Children's Hospital and Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship at Stanford. Currently I'm an Instructor of Pediatrics in the division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine.

    My long-term career goal is to develop a research program focusing on immune tolerance in stem cell transplantation and become a leader in the development of improved therapies for preventing or treating graft-versus-host disease. As such, I am excited about my ongoing work in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Negrin, focusing on the expansion and functional enhancement of regulatory T cells and invariant natural killer T cells. This work is currently supported by a St. Baldrick?s Foundation Fellowship, and has previously received funding from the Stanford Child Health Research Institute.

  • Everett Meyer

    Everett Meyer

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research focus in T cell immunotherapy and T cell immune monitoring using high-throughput sequencing and genomic approaches, with an emphasis on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the treatment of graft-versus-host disease and immune tolerance induction.

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