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  • Subsequent neoplasms and late mortality in children undergoing allogeneic transplantation for nonmalignant diseases. Blood advances Kahn, J. M., Brazauskas, R., Tecca, H. R., Bo-Subait, S., Buchbinder, D., Battiwala, M., Flowers, M. E., Savani, B. N., Phelan, R., Broglie, L., Abraham, A. A., Keating, A. K., Daly, A., Wirk, B., George, B., Alter, B. P., Ustun, C., Freytes, C. O., Beitinjaneh, A. M., Duncan, C., Copelan, E., Hildebrandt, G. C., Murthy, H. S., Lazarus, H. M., Auletta, J. J., Myers, K. C., Williams, K. M., Page, K. M., Vrooman, L. M., Norkin, M., Byrne, M., Diaz, M. A., Kamani, N., Bhatt, N. S., Rezvani, A., Farhadfar, N., Mehta, P. A., Hematti, P., Shaw, P. J., Kamble, R. T., Schears, R., Olsson, R. F., Hayashi, R. J., Gale, R. P., Mayo, S. J., Chhabra, S., Rotz, S. J., Badawy, S. M., Ganguly, S., Pavletic, S., Nishihori, T., Prestidge, T., Agrawal, V., Hogan, W. J., Inamoto, Y., Shaw, B. E., Satwani, P. 2020; 4 (9): 2084?94

    Abstract

    We examined the risk of subsequent neoplasms (SNs) and late mortality in children and adolescents undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for nonmalignant diseases (NMDs). We included 6028 patients (median age, 6 years; interquartile range, 1-11; range, <1 to 20) from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (1995-2012) registry. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) in 2-year survivors and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare mortality and SN rates with expected rates in the general population. Median follow-up of survivors was 7.8 years. Diagnoses included severe aplastic anemia (SAA; 24%), Fanconi anemia (FA; 10%), other marrow failure (6%), hemoglobinopathy (15%), immunodeficiency (23%), and metabolic/leukodystrophy syndrome (22%). Ten-year survival was 93% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 92% to 94%; SMR, 4.2; 95% CI, 3.7-4.8). Seventy-one patients developed SNs (1.2%). Incidence was highest in FA (5.5%), SAA (1.1%), and other marrow failure syndromes (1.7%); for other NMDs, incidence was <1%. Hematologic (27%), oropharyngeal (25%), and skin cancers (13%) were most common. Leukemia risk was highest in the first 5 years posttransplantation; oropharyngeal, skin, liver, and thyroid tumors primarily occurred after 5 years. Despite a low number of SNs, patients had an 11-fold increased SN risk (SIR, 11; 95% CI, 8.9-13.9) compared with the general population. We report excellent long-term survival and low SN incidence in an international cohort of children undergoing HCT for NMDs. The risk of SN development was highest in patients with FA and marrow failure syndromes, highlighting the need for long-term posttransplantation surveillance in this population.

    View details for DOI 10.1182/bloodadvances.2019000839

    View details for PubMedID 32396620

  • Non-Graft-versus-Host Disease Ocular Complications after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Expert Review from the Late Effects and Quality of Life Working Committee of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the Transplant Complications Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation BIOLOGY OF BLOOD AND MARROW TRANSPLANTATION Inamoto, Y., Petricek, I., Burns, L., Chhabra, S., DeFilipp, Z., Hematti, P., Rovo, A., Schears, R., Shah, A., Agrawal, V., Ahmed, A., Ahmed, I., Ali, A., Aljurf, M., Alkhateeb, H., Beitinjaneh, A., Bhatt, N., Buchbinder, D., Byrne, M., Callander, N., Fahnehjelm, K., Farhadfar, N., Gale, R., Ganguly, S., Hashmi, S., Hildebrandt, G. C., Horn, E., Jakubowski, A., Kamble, R. T., Law, J., Lee, C., Nathan, S., Penack, O., Pingali, R., Prasad, P., Pulanic, D., Rotz, S., Shreenivas, A., Steinberg, A., Tabbara, K., Tichelli, A., Wirk, B., Yared, J., Basak, G. W., Battiwalla, M., Duarte, R., Savani, B. N., Flowers, M. D., Shaw, B. E., Valdes-Sanz, N. 2019; 25 (5): E145?E154
  • Correction: Non-GVHD ocular complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation: expert review from the Late Effects and Quality of Life Working Committee of the CIBMTR and Transplant Complications Working Party of the EBMT. Bone marrow transplantation Inamoto, Y., Petricek, I., Burns, L., Chhabra, S., DeFilipp, Z., Hematti, P., Rovo, A., Schears, R., Shah, A., Agrawal, V., Al-Khinji, A., Ahmed, I., Ali, A., Aljurf, M., Alkhateeb, H., Beitinjaneh, A., Bhatt, N., Buchbinder, D., Byrne, M., Callander, N., Fahnehjelm, K., Farhadfar, N., Gale, R. P., Ganguly, S., Hildebrandt, G. C., Horn, E., Jakubowski, A., Kamble, R. T., Law, J., Lee, C., Nathan, S., Penack, O., Pingali, R., Prasad, P., Pulanic, D., Rotz, S., Shreenivas, A., Steinberg, A., Tabbara, K., Tichelli, A., Wirk, B., Yared, J., Basak, G. W., Battiwalla, M., Duarte, R., Savani, B. N., Flowers, M. E., Shaw, B. E., Valdes-Sanz, N. 2019

    Abstract

    In the original version of this article, author 'Aisha Al-Khinji' was incorrectly listed as 'Aisha Ahmed'. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the article to 'Aisha Al-Khinji'.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41409-019-0472-x

    View details for PubMedID 30809032

  • Characteristics of Late Fatal Infections after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation BIOLOGY OF BLOOD AND MARROW TRANSPLANTATION Norkin, M., Shaw, B. E., Brazauskas, R., Tecca, H. R., Leather, H. L., Gea-Banacloche, J., Kamble, R. T., DeFilipp, Z., Jacobsohn, D. A., Ringden, O., Inamoto, Y., Kasow, K. A., Buchbinder, D., Shaw, P., Hematti, P., Schears, R., Badawy, S. M., Lazarus, H. M., Bhatt, N., Horn, B., Chhabra, S., Page, K. M., Hamilton, B., Hildebrandt, G. C., Yared, J. A., Agrawal, V., Beitinjaneh, A. M., Majhai, N., Kindwall-Keller, T., Olsson, R. F., Schoemans, H., Gale, R., Ganguly, S., Ahmed, I. A., Schouten, H. C., Liesveld, J. L., Khera, N., Steinberg, A., Shah, A. J., Solh, M., Marks, D. I., Rybka, W., Aljurf, M., Dietz, A. C., Gergis, U., George, B., Seo, S., Flowers, M. D., Battiwalla, M., Savani, B. N., Riches, M. L., Wingard, J. R. 2019; 25 (2): 362?68
  • Impact of cytogenetic abnormalities on outcomes of adult Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a study by the Acute Leukemia Working Committee of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Haematologica Lazaryan, A. n., Dolan, M. n., Zhang, M. J., Wang, H. L., Kharfan-Dabaja, M. A., Marks, D. I., Bejanyan, N. n., Copelan, E. n., Maijhail, N. n., Waller, E. K., Chao, N. n., Prestidge, T. n., Nishihori, T. n., Kebriaei, P. n., Inamoto, Y. n., Hamilton, B. n., Hashmi, S. K., Kamble, R. T., Bacher, U. n., Hildebrandt, G. C., Stiff, P. J., McGuirk, J. n., Aldoss, I. n., Beitinjaneh, A. M., Muffly, L. n., Vij, R. n., Olsson, R. F., Byrne, M. n., Schultz, K. R., Aljurf, M. n., Seftel, M. n., Savoie, M. L., Savani, B. N., Verdonck, L. F., Cairo, M. S., Hossain, N. n., Bhatt, V. R., Frangoul, H. A., Abdel-Azim, H. n., Al Malki, M. n., Munker, R. n., Rizzieri, D. n., Khera, N. n., Nakamura, R. n., Ringdén, O. n., van der Poel, M. n., Murthy, H. S., Liu, H. n., Mori, S. n., De Oliveira, S. n., Bolaños-Meade, J. n., Elsawy, M. n., Barba, P. n., Nathan, S. n., George, B. n., Pawarode, A. n., Grunwald, M. n., Agrawal, V. n., Wang, Y. n., Assal, A. n., Castillo Caro, P. n., Kuwatsuka, Y. n., Seo, S. n., Ustun, C. n., Politikos, I. n., Lazarus, H. M., Saber, W. n., Sandmaier, B. M., de Lima, M. n., Litzow, M. n., Bachanova, V. n., Weisdorf, D. n. 2019

    Abstract

    Cytogenetic risk stratification at diagnosis has long been one of the most useful tools to assess prognosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. To examine the prognostic impact of cytogenetic abnormalities on outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, we studied 1731 adults with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia in complete remission who underwent myeloablative or reduced intensity/non-myeloablative conditioning transplant from unrelated or matched sibling donors reported to Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. A total of 632 patients had abnormal conventional metaphase cytogenetics. Patients with abnormal cytogenetics had 40% leukemia-free survival and 42% overall survival at 5-years post-transplant, which was similar to those with normal karyotype. Of the previously established cytogenetic risk classifications, modified Medical Research Council-Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score was the only independent prognosticator of leukemia-free survival (p=0.03). In the multivariable analysis, monosomy 7 predicted post-transplant relapse (hazard ratio=2.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-4.27) and treatment failure (hazard ratio=1.97; 1.20-3.24). Complex karyotype was prognostic for relapse (hazard ratio=1.69; 1.06-2.69), whereas t(8;14) predicted treatment failure (hazard ratio=2.85; 1.35-6.02) and overall mortality (hazard ratio=3.03; 1.44-6.41). This large study suggested a novel transplant-specific cytogenetic scheme with adverse (monosomy 7, complex karyotype, del(7q), t(8;14), t(11;19), del(11q), tetraploidy/near triploidy), intermediate (normal karyotype and all other abnormalities), and favorable (high hyperdiploidy) risks to prognosticate leukemia-free survival (p=0.02). Although some previously established high-risk Philadelphia-negative cytogenetic abnormalities of acute lymphoblastic leukemia can be overcome by transplant, monosomy 7, complex karyotype, and t(8;14) continue to pose significant risks and yield inferior outcomes.

    View details for DOI 10.3324/haematol.2019.220756

    View details for PubMedID 31558669

  • Non-GVHD ocular complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation: expert review from the Late Effects and Quality of Life Working Committee of the CIBMTR and Transplant Complications Working Party of the EBMT. Bone marrow transplantation Inamoto, Y., Petricek, I., Burns, L., Chhabra, S., DeFilipp, Z., Hematti, P., Rovo, A., Schears, R., Shah, A., Agrawal, V., Ahmed, A., Ahmed, I., Ali, A., Aljurf, M., Alkhateeb, H., Beitinjaneh, A., Bhatt, N., Buchbinder, D., Byrne, M., Callander, N., Fahnehjelm, K., Farhadfar, N., Gale, R. P., Ganguly, S., Hildebrandt, G. C., Horn, E., Jakubowski, A., Kamble, R. T., Law, J., Lee, C., Nathan, S., Penack, O., Pingali, R., Prasad, P., Pulanic, D., Rotz, S., Shreenivas, A., Steinberg, A., Tabbara, K., Tichelli, A., Wirk, B., Yared, J., Basak, G. W., Battiwalla, M., Duarte, R., Savani, B. N., Flowers, M. E., Shaw, B. E., Valdes-Sanz, N. 2018

    Abstract

    Non-graft-vs.-host disease (non-GVHD) ocular complications are generally uncommon after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but can cause prolonged morbidity affecting activities of daily living and quality of life. Here we provide an expert review of non-GVHD ocular complications in a collaboration between transplant physicians and ophthalmologists through the Late Effects and Quality of Life Working Committee of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the Transplant Complications Working Party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Complications discussed in this review include cataracts, glaucoma, ocular infections, ocular involvement with malignancy, ischemic microvascular retinopathy, central retinal vein occlusion, retinal hemorrhage, retinal detachment, and ocular toxicities associated with medications. We have summarized incidence, risk factors, screening, prevention and treatment of individual complicastions and generated evidence-based recommendations. Baseline ocular evaluation before HCT should be considered in all patients who undergo HCT. Follow-up evaluations should be considered according to clinical symptoms, signs and risk factors. Better preventive strategies and treatments remain to be investigated for individual ocular complications after HCT. Both transplant physicians and ophthalmologists should be knowledgeable of non-GVHD ocular complications and provide comprehensive collaborative team care.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41409-018-0339-6

    View details for PubMedID 30531955

  • Ocular graft-versus-host disease after hematopoietic cell transplantation: Expert review from the Late Effects and Quality of Life Working Committee of the CIBMTR and Transplant Complications Working Party of the EBMT. Bone marrow transplantation Inamoto, Y., Valdes-Sanz, N., Ogawa, Y., Alves, M., Berchicci, L., Galvin, J., Greinix, H., Hale, G. A., Horn, B., Kelly, D., Liu, H., Rowley, S., Schoemans, H., Shah, A., Lupo Stanghellini, M. T., Agrawal, V., Ahmed, I., Ali, A., Bhatt, N., Byrne, M., Chhabra, S., DeFilipp, Z., Fahnehjelm, K., Farhadfar, N., Horn, E., Lee, C., Nathan, S., Penack, O., Prasad, P., Rotz, S., Rovo, A., Yared, J., Pavletic, S., Basak, G. W., Battiwalla, M., Duarte, R., Savani, B. N., Flowers, M. E., Shaw, B. E., Petricek, I. 2018

    Abstract

    Ocular graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurs in more than half of patients who develop chronic GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), causing prolonged morbidity, which affects activities of daily living and quality of life. Here we provide an expert review of ocular GVHD in a collaboration between transplant physicians and ophthalmologists through the Late Effects and Quality of Life Working Committee of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the Transplant Complications Working Party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Recent updates in ocular GVHD, regarding pathophysiology, preclinical models, risk factors, prevention, screening, diagnosis, response criteria, evaluation measures, and treatment are discussed in this review. Ocular GVHD has at least three biological processes: lacrimal gland dysfunction, meibomian gland dysfunction, and corneoconjunctival inflammation. Preclinical models have found several novel pathogenic mechanisms, including renin angiotensin system and endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling that can be targeted by therapeutic agents. Many studies have identified reliable tests for establishing diagnosis and response assessment of ocular GVHD. Efficacy of systemic and topical treatment for ocular GVHD is summarized. It is important for all health professionals taking care of HCT recipients to have adequate knowledge of ocular GVHD for optimal care.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41409-018-0340-0

    View details for PubMedID 30531954

  • Non-Graft-versus-Host Disease Ocular Complications after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Expert Review from the Late Effects and Quality of Life Working Committee of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the Transplant Complications Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Inamoto, Y., Petricek, I., Burns, L., Chhabra, S., DeFilipp, Z., Hematti, P., Rovo, A., Schears, R., Shah, A., Agrawal, V., Ahmed, A., Ahmed, I., Ali, A., Aljurf, M., Alkhateeb, H., Beitinjaneh, A., Bhatt, N., Buchbinder, D., Byrne, M., Callander, N., Fahnehjelm, K., Farhadfar, N., Gale, R. P., Ganguly, S., Hildebrandt, G. C., Horn, E., Jakubowski, A., Kamble, R. T., Law, J., Lee, C., Nathan, S., Penack, O., Pingali, R., Prasad, P., Pulanic, D., Rotz, S., Shreenivas, A., Steinberg, A., Tabbara, K., Tichelli, A., Wirk, B., Yared, J., Basak, G. W., Battiwalla, M., Duarte, R., Savani, B. N., Flowers, M. E., Shaw, B. E., Valdes-Sanz, N. 2018

    Abstract

    Non-graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) ocular complications are generally uncommon after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) but can cause prolonged morbidity affecting activities of daily living and quality of life. Here we provide an expert review of non-GVHD ocular complications in a collaboration between transplantation physicians and ophthalmologists through the Late Effects and Quality of Life Working Committee of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the Transplant Complications Working Party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Complications discussed in this review include cataracts, glaucoma, ocular infections, ocular involvement with malignancy, ischemic microvascular retinopathy, central retinal vein occlusion, retinal hemorrhage, retinal detachment and ocular toxicities associated with medications. We summarize the incidence, risk factors, screening, prevention, and treatment of individual complications and generate evidence-based recommendations. Baseline ocular evaluation before HCT should be considered in all patients who undergo HCT. Follow-up evaluations should be considered according to clinical signs and symptoms and risk factors. Better preventive strategies and treatments remain to be investigated for individual ocular complications after HCT. Both transplantation physicians and ophthalmologists should be knowledgeable about non-GVHD ocular complications and provide comprehensive collaborative team care.

    View details for PubMedID 30521975

  • Ocular graft-versus-host disease after hematopoietic cell transplantation: expert review from the Late Effects and Quality of Life Working Committee of the CIBMTR and Transplant Complications Working Party of the EBMT. Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Inamoto, Y., Valdes-Sanz, N., Ogawa, Y., Alves, M., Berchicci, L., Galvin, J., Greinix, H., Hale, G. A., Horn, B., Kelly, D., Liu, H., Rowley, S., Schoemans, H., Shah, A., Stanghellini, M. T., Agrawal, V., Ahmed, I., Ali, A., Bhatt, N., Byrne, M., Chhabra, S., DeFilipp, Z., Fahnehjelm, K., Farhadfar, N., Horn, E., Lee, C., Nathan, S., Penack, O., Prasad, P., Rotz, S., Rovo, A., Yared, J., Pavletic, S., Basak, G. W., Battiwalla, M., Duarte, R., Savani, B. N., Flowers, M. E., Shaw, B. E., Petricek, I. 2018

    Abstract

    Ocular graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurs in more than half of patients who develop chronic GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), causing prolonged morbidity which affects activities of daily living and quality of life. Here we provide an expert review of ocular GVHD in a collaboration between transplant physicians and ophthalmologists through the Late Effects and Quality of Life Working Committee of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the Transplant Complications Working Party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Recent updates in ocular GVHD, regarding pathophysiology, preclinical models, risk factors, prevention, screening, diagnosis, response criteria, evaluation measures, and treatment are discussed in this review. Ocular GVHD has at least three biological processes: lacrimal gland dysfunction, meibomian gland dysfunction, and corneoconjunctival inflammation. Preclinical models have found several novel pathogenic mechanisms including renin angiotensin system and endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling that can be targeted by therapeutic agents. Many studies have identified reliable tests for establishing diagnosis and response assessment of ocular GVHD. Efficacy of systemic and topical treatment for ocular GVHD is summarized. It is important for all health professionals taking care of HCT recipients to have adequate knowledge of ocular GVHD for optimal care.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.11.021

    View details for PubMedID 30481594

  • Characteristics of Late Fatal Infections after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant. Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Norkin, M., Shaw, B. E., Brazauskas, R., Tecca, H. R., Leather, H. L., Gea-Banacloche, J., Kamble, R., DeFilipp, Z., Jacobsohn, D. A., Ringden, O., Inamoto, Y., Kasow, K., Buchbinder, D., Shaw, P., Hematti, P., Schears, R., Badawy, S. M., Lazarus, H. M., Bhatt, N., Horn, B., Chhabra, S., Page, K., Hamilton, B., Hildebrandt, G. C., Yared, J. A., Agrawal, V., Beitinjaneh, A., Majhail, N., Kindwall-Keller, T., Olsson, R. F., Schoemans, H., Gale, R. P., Ganguly, S., Ahmed, I., Schouten, H. C., Liesveld, J., Khera, N., Steinberg, A., Shah, A. J., Solh, M., Marks, D. I., Rybka, W., Aljurf, M., Dietz, A. C., Gergis, U., George, B., Seo, S., Flowers, M. E., Battiwalla, M., Savani, B. N., Riches, M. L., Wingard, J. R. 2018

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: We analyzed late fatal infections (LFI) in allogeneic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.METHODS: We analyzed the incidence, infection types and risk factors contributing to LFI in 10336 adult and 5088 pediatric subjects surviving ?2 years after first HCT without relapse.RESULTS: Among 2245 adult and 377 pediatric subjects who died, infections were a primary or contributory cause of death in 687(31%) and 110(29%) subjects, respectively. At 12 years post-HCT cumulative incidence of LFIs was 6.4 % (95% confidence interval[CI]:5.8-7.0%) in adults as compared with 1.8% (95%CI:1.4-2.3%) in pediatric subjects, p<0.001. In adults, the two most significant risks for developing LFI were increasing age (20-39, 40-54 and ? 55 vs 18-19 years) with hazard ratio (HR) of 3.12 (95%CI:1.33-7.32), 3.86 (95%CI:1.66-8.95) and 5.49 (95%CI:2.32-12.99) and a history of chronic GVHD (cGVHD) with ongoing immunosuppression 2 years post-HCT as compared to no history of GVHD with HR 3.87 (95%CI:2.59-5.78), respectively. In pediatric subjects, the three most significant risks for developing LFI were a history of cGVHD with (HR 9.49, 95%CI:4.39-20.51) or without (HR 2.7,95%CI:1.05-7.43) ongoing immunosuppression 2 years post-HCT as compared to no history of GVHD, diagnosis of inherited abnormalities of erythrocyte function as compared to diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (HR 2.30, 95%CI:1.19-4.42) and age >10 years (HR 1.92, 95%CI:1.15-3.2).CONCLUSION: This study emphasizes the importance of continued vigilance for late infections after HCT and support strategies aimed to decrease the risk of cGVHD.

    View details for PubMedID 30287390

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