Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Associate Program Director, Clinical Informatics Fellowship, Stanford University Medical Center (2014 - Present)
  • Medical Director of Clinical Informatics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (2012 - Present)
  • Physician Lead, Epic EMR Inpatient Implementation, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (2012 - Present)
  • Associate Medical Director of Clinical Decision Support, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (2010 - 2012)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2007)
  • MEd, University of Cincinnati, Medical Education (2013)
  • Board Certification, American Board of Preventive Medicine, Clinical Informatics (2013)
  • Fellowship:Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (06/2010) CA
  • Board Certification: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, American Board of Pediatrics (2010)
  • Medical Education:Stanford University School of Medicine (06/2004) CA
  • Residency:Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (06/2007) CA

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


In my administrative role, I oversee the development and maintenance of clinical decision support tools within the electronic medical record. These clinical decision support tools are designed to enhance patient safety, efficiency, and quality of care. My research focuses on rigorously evaluating--1) how these tools affect clinician knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors; and 2) how these tools affect clinical outcomes and efficiency of health care delivery.

Teaching

Graduate and Fellowship Programs


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Medical education in the electronic medical record (EMR) era: benefits, challenges, and future directions. Academic medicine Tierney, M. J., Pageler, N. M., Kahana, M., Pantaleoni, J. L., Longhurst, C. A. 2013; 88 (6): 748-752

    Abstract

    In the last decade, electronic medical record (EMR) use in academic medical centers has increased. Although many have lauded the clinical and operational benefits of EMRs, few have considered the effect these systems have on medical education. The authors review what has been documented about the effect of EMR use on medical learners through the lens of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies for medical education. They examine acknowledged benefits and educational risks to use of EMRs, consider factors that promote their successful use when implemented in academic environments, and identify areas of future research and optimization of EMRs' role in medical education.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/ACM.0b013e3182905ceb

    View details for PubMedID 23619078

  • A clinical case of electronic health record drug alert fatigue: consequences for patient outcome. Pediatrics Carspecken, C. W., Sharek, P. J., Longhurst, C., Pageler, N. M. 2013; 131 (6): e1970-3

    Abstract

    Despite advances in electronic medication order entry systems, it has been well established that clinicians override many drug allergy alerts generated by the electronic health record. The direct clinical consequences of overalerting clinicians in a pediatric setting have not been well demonstrated in the literature. We observed a patient in the PICU who experienced complications as a result of an extended series of non-evidence-based alerts in the electronic health record. Subsequently, evidence-based allergy alerting changes were made to the hospital's system. Incorporating clinical evidence in electronic drug allergy alerting systems remains challenging, especially in pediatric settings.

    View details for DOI 10.1542/peds.2012-3252

    View details for PubMedID 23713099

  • Embedding time-limited laboratory orders within computerized provider order entry reduces laboratory utilization*. Pediatric critical care medicine Pageler, N. M., Franzon, D., Longhurst, C. A., Wood, M., Shin, A. Y., Adams, E. S., Widen, E., Cornfield, D. N. 2013; 14 (4): 413-419

    Abstract

    : To test the hypothesis that limits on repeating laboratory studies within computerized provider order entry decrease laboratory utilization.: Cohort study with historical controls.: A 20-bed PICU in a freestanding, quaternary care, academic children's hospital.: This study included all patients admitted to the pediatric ICU between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2009. A total of 818 discharges were evaluated prior to the intervention (January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2008) and 1,021 patient discharges were evaluated postintervention (January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2009).: A computerized provider order entry rule limited the ability to schedule repeating complete blood cell counts, chemistry, and coagulation studies to a 24-hour interval in the future. The time limit was designed to ensure daily evaluation of the utility of each test.: Initial analysis with t tests showed significant decreases in tests per patient day in the postintervention period (complete blood cell counts: 1.5 ± 0.1 to 1.0 ± 0.1; chemistry: 10.6 ± 0.9 to 6.9 ± 0.6; coagulation: 3.3 ± 0.4 to 1.7 ± 0.2; p < 0.01, all variables vs. preintervention period). Even after incorporating a trend toward decreasing laboratory utilization in the preintervention period into our regression analysis, the intervention decreased complete blood cell counts (p = 0.007), chemistry (p = 0.049), and coagulation (p = 0.001) tests per patient day.: Limits on laboratory orders within the context of computerized provider order entry decreased laboratory utilization without adverse affects on mortality or length of stay. Broader application of this strategy might decrease costs, the incidence of iatrogenic anemia, and catheter-associated bloodstream infections.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/PCC.0b013e318272010c

    View details for PubMedID 23439456

  • Refocusing medical education in the EMR era. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association Pageler, N. M., Friedman, C. P., Longhurst, C. A. 2013; 310 (21): 2249-50

    View details for DOI 10.1001/jama.2013.282326

    View details for PubMedID 24302083

  • Computerized Physician Order Entry With Decision Support Decreases Blood Transfusions in Children PEDIATRICS Adams, E. S., Longhurst, C. A., Pageler, N., Widen, E., Franzon, D., Cornfield, D. N. 2011; 127 (5): E1112-E1119

    Abstract

    Timely provision of evidence-based recommendations through computerized physician order entry with clinical decision support may improve use of red blood cell transfusions (RBCTs).We performed a cohort study with historical controls including inpatients admitted between February 1, 2008, and January 31, 2010. A clinical decision-support alert for RBCTs was constructed by using current evidence. RBCT orders resulted in assessment of the patient's medical record with prescriber notification if parameters were not within recommended ranges. Primary end points included the average pretransfusion hemoglobin level and the rate of RBCTs per patient-day.In total, 3293 control discharges and 3492 study discharges were evaluated. The mean (SD) control pretransfusion hemoglobin level in the PICU was 9.83 (2.63) g/dL (95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.65-10.01) compared with the study value of 8.75 (2.05) g/dL (95% CI: 8.59-8.90) (P < .0001). The wards' control value was 7.56 (0.93) g/dL (95% CI: 7.47-7.65), the study value was 7.14 (1.01) g/dL (95% CI: 6.99-7.28) (P < .0001). The control PICU rate of RBCTs per patient-day was 0.20 (0.11) (95% CI: 0.13-0.27), the study rate was 0.14 (0.04) (95% CI: 0.11-0.17) (P = .12). The PICU's control rate was 0.033 (0.01) (95% CI: 0.02-0.04), and the study rate was 0.017 (0.007) (95% CI: 0.01-0.02) (P < .0001). There was no difference in mortality rates across all cohorts.Implementation of clinical decision-support alerts was associated with a decrease in RBCTs, which suggests improved adoption of evidence-based recommendations. This strategy might be widely applied to promote timely adoption of scientific evidence.

    View details for DOI 10.1542/peds.2010-3252

    View details for Web of Science ID 000290097800002

    View details for PubMedID 21502229

  • In reply. Academic medicine Tierney, M. J., Longhurst, C. A., Pageler, N. M. 2013; 88 (12): 1790-1791

    View details for DOI 10.1097/ACM.0000000000000034

    View details for PubMedID 24280794

  • Significant Toxicity in a Young Female After Low-Dose Tricyclic Antidepressant Ingestion PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY CARE Grover, C. A., Flaherty, B., Lung, D., Pageler, N. M. 2012; 28 (10): 1066-1069

    Abstract

    Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) ingestions are a relatively common pediatric ingestion, with significant potential for both cardiac and neurological toxicity. Previous studies on pediatric TCA ingestions have found the threshold of toxicity to be 5 mg/kg.We report a case of an 8-year-old girl who presented to the emergency department with depressed mental status and seizure-like movements. An extensive workup was pursued to evaluate the cause of her mental status, which only revealed a positive urine toxicology screen for TCA. Quantified serum levels of amitriptyline were 121 ng/mL (therapeutic range, 50-300 ng/mL) and nortriptyline were 79 ng/mL (therapeutic range 70-170 ng/mL), 18 hours after onset of symptoms. Subsequent history obtained after her mental status returned to normal revealed that she had ingested amitriptyline at a dose of 0.8 mg/kg.Tricyclic antidepressant ingestion has a high potential for toxicity in pediatric patients. This case suggests, contrary to previous literature, that toxicity may occur even with small doses.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/PEC.0b013e31826cebfb

    View details for Web of Science ID 000309656900025

    View details for PubMedID 23034495

  • Making pediatrics residency programs family friendly: Views along the professional educational continuum JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS Sectish, T. C., Rosenberg, A. R., Pageler, N. M., Chamberlain, L. J., Burgos, A., Stuart, E. 2006; 149 (1): 1-2

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2006.06.006

    View details for Web of Science ID 000239352000001

    View details for PubMedID 16860111

  • Heart rate correlates of attachment status in young mothers and their infants JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY Zelenko, M., Kraemer, H., Huffman, L., Gschwendt, M., Pageler, N., Steiner, H. 2005; 44 (5): 470-476

    Abstract

    To explore heart rate (HR) correlates of attachment behavior in young mothers and their infants to generate specific hypotheses and to provide pilot data on which studies to test those hypotheses might be based.Using the strange situation procedure, patterns of attachment were assessed in 41 low-income adolescent mothers and their infants. During the procedure, the HRs of the infants and mothers were recorded. The HR changes were analyzed and infant attachment group differences were examined.Infants in all attachment groups demonstrated a similar HR response. There were, however, notably different behavioral reactions in the insecure groups: relatively increased behavioral distress in the insecure/resistant infants and relatively decreased behavioral distress in insecure-avoidant infants. Mothers of insecure-resistant infants demonstrated elevated HRs during reunions and the insecure/resistant dyads demonstrated lower consistency between HR changes in infant and mother than the secure dyads.The results suggest the discrepancy between attachment-related behavioral reactions and HR response in insecurely attached infants. Maternal and dyadic HR changes vary between the attachment groups.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/01.chi.0000157325.10232.b1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000228610000012

    View details for PubMedID 15843769

  • Effect of head orientation on gaze processing in fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus NEUROIMAGE Pageler, N. M., Menon, V., Merin, N. M., Eliez, S., Brown, W. E., Reiss, A. L. 2003; 20 (1): 318-329

    Abstract

    We used functional MRI with an event-related design to dissociate the brain activation in the fusiform gyrus (FG) and posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) for multiple face and gaze orientations. The event-related design allowed for concurrent behavioral analysis, which revealed a significant effect of both head and gaze orientation on the speed of gaze processing, with the face and gaze forward condition showing the fastest reaction times. In conjunction with this behavioral finding, the FG responded with the greatest activation to face and gaze forward, perhaps reflecting the unambiguous social salience of congruent face and gaze directed toward the viewer. Random effects analysis showed greater activation in both the FG and posterior STS when the subjects viewed a direct face compared to an angled face, regardless of gaze direction. Additionally, the FG showed greater activation for forward gaze compared to angled gaze, but only when the face was forward. Together, these findings suggest that head orientation has a significant effect on gaze processing and these effects are manifest not only in the STS, but also the FG.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S1053-8119(03)00229-5

    View details for Web of Science ID 000185746400028

    View details for PubMedID 14527592

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