Bio

Bio


Dr. Lui studied physics as an undergraduate at Harvard before attending medical school at Johns Hopkins. She completed a general surgery residency at the University of California San Francisco, which included two years of research in the UCSF Thoracic Oncology Laboratory and completion of a Master in Advanced Studies in clinical research. Dr. Lui went on to hold a fellowship in Thoracic Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, during which she participated in visiting rotations at Memorial Sloan Kettering and the Mayo Clinic.

Dr. Lui’s clinical focus extends to all aspects of general thoracic surgical diseases, and her research focus will be clinical and translational. She is excited to be back in California and looking forward to the warm weather, good food, and beautiful outdoors.

Clinical Focus


  • Thoracic Surgery

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • BA, Harvard University, Physics (2002)
  • MD, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Medicine (2007)
  • MAS, University of California San Francisco, Clinical research (2012)
  • Residency, University of California San Francisco, General surgery (2014)
  • Fellowship, Massachusetts General Hospital, Thoracic surgery (2016)

Publications

All Publications


  • SULF2 Expression Is a Potential Diagnostic and Prognostic Marker in Lung Cancer PLOS ONE Lui, N. S., Yang, Y., van Zante, A., Buchanan, P., Jablons, D. M., Lemjabbar-Alaoui, H. 2016; 11 (2)

    Abstract

    Lung cancer is one of the most deadly cancers; median survival from diagnosis is less than one year in those with advanced disease. Novel lung cancer biomarkers are desperately needed. In this study, we evaluated SULF2 expression by immunohistochemistry and its association with overall survival in a cohort of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We also looked for the presence of SULF2 protein in plasma to evaluate its potential as an early detection biomarker for NSCLC.We identified patients who underwent surgical resection for pulmonary adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma at our institution. A section from each paraffin-embedded specimen was stained with a SULF2 antibody. A pathologist determined the percentage and intensity of tumor cell staining. Survival analysis was performed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Using a novel SULF2 ELISA assay, we analyzed plasma levels of SULF2 in a small cohort of healthy donors and patients with early stage NSCLC.SULF2 staining was present in 82% of the lung cancer samples. Squamous cell carcinomas had a higher mean percentage of staining than adenocarcinomas (100% vs. 60%; p<0.0005). After adjusting for age, sex, race, histologic type, stage, and neoadjuvant therapy, there was a non-significant (31%; p = 0.65) increase in the risk of death for patients with adenocarcinoma with SULF2 staining in tumor cells. In contrast, there was a significant decrease in the risk of death (89%; p = 0.02) for patients with squamous cell carcinoma with SULF2 staining in tumor cells. SULF2 protein was present in plasma of patients with early stage NSCLC, and soluble SULF2 levels increased with age. Finally, plasma SULF2 levels were significantly elevated in early stage NSCLC patients, compared to healthy controls.Tumor expression of SULF2 may affect prognosis in NSCLC, while blood SULF2 levels may have a significant role in the diagnosis of this fatal disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0148911

    View details for Web of Science ID 000371219000032

    View details for PubMedID 26882224

  • Intraoperative Tracheal Injury THORACIC SURGERY CLINICS Lui, N., Wright, C. 2015; 25 (3): 249-?

    Abstract

    Intraoperative tracheal injury is a rare but potentially devastating complication. Transhiatal esophagectomy should be avoided in patients with proximal esophageal tumors who underwent neoadjuvant therapy, and percutaneous tracheostomy should be avoided in patients with short, thick necks. Early recognition leads to improved outcomes. Patients present with a sudden loss in airway pressure, air leaking into the operative field, or mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema. Treatment starts with airway control. Primary buttressed repair is recommended, through either a left cervical incision for proximal injuries or a right thoracotomy for distal injuries. Nonoperative management has been used safely in select patients injured during intubation or tracheostomy.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.thorsurg.2015.04.008

    View details for Web of Science ID 000359891100004

    View details for PubMedID 26210921

  • SULF2 expression by immunohistochemistry and overall survival in oesophageal cancer: a cohort study BMJ OPEN Lui, N. S., van Zante, A., Rosen, S. D., Jablons, D. M., Lemjabbar-Alaoui, H. 2012; 2 (6)

    Abstract

    Oesophageal cancer is the eighth most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide, and there is a need for biomarkers to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. Sulfatases 2 (SULF2) is an extracellular endosulphatase that regulates several signalling pathways in carcinogenesis and has been associated with poor prognosis. This study evaluates the relationship between SULF2 expression by immunohistochemistry and overall survival in patients with oesophageal cancer.Cohort study.Single tertiary care centre.We included patients who underwent esophagectomy for invasive oesophageal adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma at a tertiary care centre from 1997 to 2006. We excluded patients with recurrent oesophageal cancer or less than 3 mm invasive tumour on H&E stained slide. A section from each paraffin-embedded tissue specimen was stained with an anti-SULF2 monoclonal antibody.A pathologist blinded to overall survival determined the percentage and intensity of tumour cells staining. Vital status was obtained through the Social Security Death Master File, and overall survival was calculated from the date of surgery.One-hundred patients with invasive oesophageal cancer were identified, including 75 patients with adenocarcinoma and 25 patients with squamous cell carcinoma. The squamous cell carcinoma samples had a higher mean percentage and intensity of tumour cells staining compared with the adenocarcinoma samples. After adjusting for age, sex, race, histological type, stage and neoadjuvant therapy, for every 10% increase in percentage of tumour cells staining for SULF2, the HR for death increased by 13% (95% CI 1.01 to 1.25; p=0.03).The majority of adenocarcinoma samples and all of the squamous cell carcinoma samples had SULF2 staining. The percentage of tumour cells staining for SULF2 was significantly associated with overall survival. Thus, SULF2 is a potential biomarker in oesophageal cancer and may have an important role in the management of patients with this disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001624

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315081400071

    View details for PubMedID 23180455