Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Neurology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Headache Medicine, United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties (2014)
  • Fellowship:Stanford School of Medicine (2014) CAUnited States of America
  • Residency:University of California at Irvine (2013) CA
  • Internship:University of California at Irvine (2010) CA
  • Medical Education:University of Toledo College of Medicine (2009) OH
  • Board Certification: Neurology, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (2013)

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • A Study of LY2951742 in Participants With Episodic Cluster Headache Recruiting

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the study drug known as LY2951742 in participants with episodic cluster headaches.

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  • A Study of LY2951742 in Participants With Chronic Cluster Headache Recruiting

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the study drug known as LY2951742 in participants with chronic cluster headache.

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  • eNeura SpringTMS Post-Market Observational US Study of Migraine Not Recruiting

    A multi-center, prospective, non-randomized, single arm, open label, post-market, observational study to evaluate the use of the eneura, springtms system in reduction of migraine headache symptoms.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Evalina Salas, 650-723-6469.

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Publications

All Publications


  • A multicenter, prospective, single arm, open label, observational study of sTMS for migraine prevention (ESPOUSE Study) CEPHALALGIA Starling, A. J., Tepper, S. J., Marmura, M. J., Shamim, E. A., Robbins, M. S., Hindiyeh, N., Charles, A. C., Goadsby, P. J., Lipton, R. B., Silberstein, S. D., Gelfand, A. A., Chiacchierini, R. P., Dodick, D. W. 2018; 38 (6): 1038–48

    Abstract

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (sTMS) for the preventive treatment of migraine. Background sTMS was originally developed for the acute treatment of migraine with aura. Open label experience has suggested a preventive benefit. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of sTMS for migraine prevention. Methods The eNeura SpringTMS Post-Market Observational U.S. Study of Migraine (ESPOUSE) Study was a multicenter, prospective, open label, observational study. From December 2014 to March 2016, patients with migraine (n = 263) were consented to complete a 1-month baseline headache diary followed by 3 months of treatment. The treatment protocol consisted of preventive (four pulses twice daily) and acute (three pulses repeated up to three times for each attack) treatment. Patients reported daily headache status, medication use, and device use with a monthly headache diary. The primary endpoint, mean reduction of headache days compared to baseline, was measured over the 28-day period during weeks 9 to 12. The primary endpoint was compared to a statistically-derived placebo estimate (performance goal). Secondary endpoints included: 50% responder rate, acute headache medication consumption, HIT-6, and mean reduction in total headache days from baseline of any intensity. Results Of a total of 263 consented subjects, 229 completed a baseline diary, and 220 were found to be eligible based on the number of headache days. The device was assigned to 217 subjects (Safety Data Set) and 132 were included in the intention to treat Full Analysis Set. For the primary endpoint, there was a -2.75 ± 0.40 mean reduction of headache days from baseline (9.06 days) compared to the performance goal (-0.63 days) ( p < 0.0001). The 50% responder rate of 46% (95% CI 37%, 56%) was also significantly higher ( p < 0.0001) than the performance goal (20%). There was a reduction of -2.93 (5.24) days of acute medication use, headache impact measured by HIT-6, -3.1 (6.4) ( p < 0.0001), and total headache days of any intensity -3.16 days (5.21) compared to the performance goal (-0.63 days) ( p < 0.0001). The most common adverse events were lightheadedness (3.7%), tingling (3.2%), and tinnitus (3.2%). There were no serious adverse events. Conclusions This open label study suggests that sTMS may be an effective, well-tolerated treatment option for migraine prevention. Trial registration number NCT02357381.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0333102418762525

    View details for Web of Science ID 000432049800003

    View details for PubMedID 29504483

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5944078

  • A Multicenter, Prospective, Single Arm, Open Label, Post-Market, Observational Study to evaluate the use of sTMS in reduction of Migraine Headache (ESPOUSE Study) Starling, A. J., Tepper, S. J., Marmura, M. J., Shamim, E. A., Robbins, M. S., Hindiyeh, N. A., Charles, A. C., Goadsby, P. J., Lipton, R. B., Silberstein, S. D., Dodick, D. W. SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD. 2017: 115–16
  • Improving the detection of chronic migraine: Development and validation of Identify Chronic Migraine (ID-CM) CEPHALALGIA Lipton, R. B., Serrano, D., Buse, D. C., Pavlovic, J. M., Blumenfeld, A. M., Dodick, D. W., Aurora, S. K., Becker, W. J., Diener, H., Wang, S., Vincent, M. B., Hindiyeh, N. A., Starling, A. J., Gillard, P. J., Varon, S. F., Reed, M. L. 2016; 36 (3): 203-215

    Abstract

    Migraine, particularly chronic migraine (CM), is underdiagnosed and undertreated worldwide. Our objective was to develop and validate a self-administered tool (ID-CM) to identify migraine and CM.ID-CM was developed in four stages. (1) Expert clinicians suggested candidate items from existing instruments and experience (Delphi Panel method). (2) Candidate items were reviewed by people with CM during cognitive debriefing interviews. (3) Items were administered to a Web panel of people with severe headache to assess psychometric properties and refine ID-CM. (4) Classification accuracy was assessed using an ICHD-3β gold-standard clinician diagnosis.Stages 1 and 2 identified 20 items selected for psychometric validation in stage 3 (n = 1562). The 12 psychometrically robust items from stage 3 underwent validity testing in stage 4. A scoring algorithm applied to four symptom items (moderate/severe pain intensity, photophobia, phonophobia, nausea) accurately classified most migraine cases among 111 people (sensitivity = 83.5%, specificity = 88.5%). Augmenting this algorithm with eight items assessing headache frequency, disability, medication use, and planning disruption correctly classified most CM cases (sensitivity = 80.6%, specificity = 88.6%).ID-CM is a simple yet accurate tool that correctly classifies most individuals with migraine and CM. Further testing in other settings will also be valuable.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0333102415583982

    View details for Web of Science ID 000371311100001

    View details for PubMedID 26002700

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4766965

  • What the Gut Can Teach Us About Migraine CURRENT PAIN AND HEADACHE REPORTS Hindiyeh, N., Aurora, S. K. 2015; 19 (7)

    Abstract

    During gestation, cells of the brain and gut develop almost simultaneously into the central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS), respectively. They remain connected via the vagal nerve lifelong. While it is well known that the brain sends signal to the gut, communication is in fact bidirectional. Just as the brain can modulate gut functioning, the gut, and likely what we ingest, can in fact influence our brain functioning. We will first review both gastrointestinal (GI) function and migraine pathophysiology and then discuss evidence linking the migraine brain to various GI disorders. Lastly, we discuss the effects of gut microbiota on brain functioning and speculate how the gut and particularly diet may affect migraine.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11916-015-0501-4

    View details for Web of Science ID 000356254100004

    View details for PubMedID 26049770

  • Does exercise make migraines worse and tension type headaches better? Current pain and headache reports Hindiyeh, N. A., Krusz, J. C., Cowan, R. P. 2013; 17 (12): 380-?

    Abstract

    Many non-pharmacological treatments have been implicated in the treatment of primary headache, with exercise being a common recommendation. In this review we first provide an overview of the relationship between exercise and primary headaches. We then review the physiology of pain modulation, with focus on the endogenous opioids, endocannabinoids, and neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and their associations with primary headache and exercise. Finally, we summarize current literature evaluating effects of exercise on primary headache in an effort to understand the benefits and disadvantages of exercise in primary headaches.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11916-013-0380-5

    View details for PubMedID 24234818

  • Does exercise make migraines worse and tension type headaches better? Current pain and headache reports Hindiyeh, N. A., Krusz, J. C., Cowan, R. P. 2013; 17 (12): 380-?

    Abstract

    Many non-pharmacological treatments have been implicated in the treatment of primary headache, with exercise being a common recommendation. In this review we first provide an overview of the relationship between exercise and primary headaches. We then review the physiology of pain modulation, with focus on the endogenous opioids, endocannabinoids, and neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and their associations with primary headache and exercise. Finally, we summarize current literature evaluating effects of exercise on primary headache in an effort to understand the benefits and disadvantages of exercise in primary headaches.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11916-013-0380-5

    View details for PubMedID 24234818