Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Emergency Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Founder of the re-direction /technology transfer program for the Russian scientists, Harvard/MIT Center for Integration of Medicine and Technology (2004 - 2005)
  • Consultant: BioIndustry Initiative;, US State Department (2004 - 2005)
  • Medical Director of Disaster Response, UCSF (2005 - 2006)
  • Diplomat of the American Board of the Emergency Medicine, . (2005 - Present)
  • Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School (2004 - 2005)
  • Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine (2005 - Present)
  • Course Director "Responding to Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Weapons", Harvard Medical School CME (2005 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship:Harvard Surgical Services Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (2005) MA
  • Residency:Harvard Surgical Services Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (2004) MA
  • Board Certification: Emergency Medicine, American Board of Emergency Medicine (2004)
  • Medical Education:University of California San Francisco (2001) CA

Community and International Work


  • Train the Trainer Course, Georgia, former USSR

    Topic

    First Response

    Partnering Organization(s)

    AIHA (American International Health Alliance)

    Populations Served

    CIS (countries of the former Soviet Union)

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Co-founder and volunteer, UCSF Student clinic for Homeless Women

    Partnering Organization(s)

    UCSF

    Populations Served

    homeless women

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


responding to the agents of bioterrorism, bioterrorism prevention, international relief and international EMS, disaster medicine, integration of medicine and technology, innovations in medicine

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Humming is as effective as Valsalva's maneuver and Trendelenburg's position for ultrasonographic visualization of the jugular venous system and common femoral veins ANNALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Lewin, M. R., Stein, J., Wang, R., Lee, M. M., Kernberg, M., Boukhman, M., Hahn, I., Lewiss, R. E. 2007; 50 (1): 73-77

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study is to compare ultrasonographic visualization of the jugular and common femoral veins by using a novel technique (humming) and 2 conventional techniques (Valsalva's maneuver and Trendelenburg's position). The Valsalva's maneuver and Trendelenburg's position are common methods for producing venous distention, aiding ultrasonographically guided identification and cannulation of the jugular and common femoral veins. We hypothesize that humming is as effective as either Valsalva's maneuver or Trendelenburg's position for distention and ultrasonographic visualization of these procedurally important blood vessels. Herein, we investigate a new method of venous distension that may aid in the placement of central venous catheters by ultrasonographic guidance.Healthy, normal volunteers aged 28 to 67 years were enrolled. Each subject's internal jugular, external jugular, and common femoral veins were measured in cross-section by ultrasonograph during rest (baseline), humming, Valsalva's maneuver, and Trendelenburg's position. Three measurements were recorded per observation in each position. Subjects were used as their own controls, and measurements were normalized to percentage increase in diameter during each maneuver or position for later comparison.The study population consisted of 7 subjects, with a mean age of 47 years. Cross-sectional area was calculated for each vessel in 3 groups: baseline/control, Valsalva, Trendelenburg, and humming. The mean percentage change (+/-SD) relative to baseline cross-sectional area of the jugular vessels for each subject were external jugular vein: humming 134%+/-25% (95% confidence interval [CI] 124.9% to 146.9%), Valsalva 136%+/-23% (95% CI 121.3% to 147.5%), Trendelenburg 137%+/-32% (95% CI 120.7% to 156.9%); internal jugular vein: humming 137%+/-27% (95% CI 119.4% to 148.2%), Valsalva 139%+/-24% (95% CI 122.4% to 148.7%), Trendelenburg 141%+/-35% (95% CI 116.5% to 156.5%); common femoral vein: humming 131%+/-15% (95% CI 120.4% to 139.1%), Valsalva 139%+/-18% (95% CI 127.9% to 150.4%), Trendelenburg 132%+/-24% (95% CI 113.3% to 142.9%).All 3 maneuvers distended the external jugular, internal jugular, and common femoral veins compared to baseline. There was no important difference in magnitude of cross-sectional area between any of the 3 maneuvers when compared with one another. Humming shares many physiologic similarities to Valsalva's maneuver and may be more familiar and easier to perform during procedures such as ultrasonographically guided central venous catheter placement and insertion of external jugular intravenous catheters.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2007.01.024

    View details for Web of Science ID 000247773500019

    View details for PubMedID 17433497

  • Cholera Disaster Medicine. Philadelphia:Elsevier Boukhman MB, Ciottone GR 2005
  • Sustainability of Emergency Medicine/ First Responder Training centers in the CIS 3rd Emergency Medicine Mediterranean Congress (poster presentation) Boukhman, M., Kelly S, Freitas R, Ciottone GR, Chen Y, Anderson PD 2005
  • Atrial Fibrillation Micromedex Boukhman MP, Wolfe R 2003
  • Surgical Management of Insulinomas Atlas of Surgical Oncology Boukhman MP, Perrier NI, Clark OH 2003
  • Thresholds in contact sensitization: Immunologic mechanisms and experimental evidence in humans - an overview FOOD AND CHEMICAL TOXICOLOGY Boukhman, M. P., Maibach, H. I. 2001; 39 (12): 1125-1134

    Abstract

    The evidence from practical experience in man, from controlled human testing and from both chemical and biological mechanistic considerations, demonstrates that the thresholds for skin sensitization exist both at the level of induction as well as sensitization. For a given contact allergen, the concentration (expressed in dose per unit area), which is at the threshold, has to be defined in terms of the nature and extent of the skin contact involved, and whether it is the induction of skin sensitization or its elicitation that is involved, since the numerical values will depend heavily on these parameters. The induction and elicitation of contact allergy is influenced by several factors: the total dose of the allergen, its surface concentration, the size of area over which it is applied, antigenic potency of the substance, number of exposures, anatomical site of exposure, effect of draining lymph nodes, matrix (vehicle) of allergen, effect of occlusion, degree of percutaneous penetration, effect of diseased skin/trauma and possibly a host of other, as yet unknown, variables.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000172349200001

    View details for PubMedID 11696387

  • Contact Urticaria Syndrome: Occupational Hazards. Clinics in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Boukhman MP, Maibach HI 2001; 1(1) (1): 13-34
  • Allergic contact dermatitis from tropicamide ophthalmic solution CONTACT DERMATITIS Boukhman, M. P., MAIBACH, H. I. 1999; 41 (1): 47-48

    View details for Web of Science ID 000081212100014

    View details for PubMedID 10416714

  • Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia in Children (poster presentation) Pacific Coast Surgical Association. 70th Annual Meeting. Boukhman, M., Clark, OH 1999
  • Localization of Insulinomas (abstract) JAMA Boukhman MP, Siperstein AI, Clark OH 1999; 282 (17): 1608
  • Insulinoma - Experience from 1950 to 1995 WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Boukhman, M. P., Karam, J. H., Shaver, J., Siperstein, A. E., Duh, Q. Y., Clark, O. H. 1998; 169 (2): 98-104

    Abstract

    Insulinomas are rare tumors that originate from the islet cells of the pancreas. The purpose of this study was to analyze our experience in patients with insulinoma and present our approach to these patients. Medical records of 67 patients treated at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center, 56 surgically and 11 medically, from 1954 to 1995 were retrospectively reviewed. Presenting symptoms, physical findings, laboratory data, pre and intraoperative localization studies, operative management, operative success, and post-operative complications were analyzed. Among the entire cohort, there were 11 patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type I (MEN 1) and 7 patients with multiple tumors. 46 out of 48 patients (96%) having first operations for benign tumors and 5 out of 8 patients (63%) having reoperations for benign tumors were successful, as were 6 out of 12 patients (50%) having operations for islet cell carcinoma. Overall, preoperative localization studies were positive in only 46% of patients and therefore failed to improve our surgical outcome. Careful palpation with intraoperative ultrasonography gave the best localization results. Enucleation of solitary tumors is curative in sporadic cases and gives the lowest complication rate. In patients with MEN 1, subtotal pancreatectomy with enucleation of tumours from the pancreatic head and uncinate process is recommended over simple enucleation because of frequent multiple tumors.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000075386300004

    View details for PubMedID 9735690

Conference Proceedings


  • Localization of insulinomas Boukhman, M. P., Karam, J. M., Shaver, J., Siperstein, A. E., DeLorimier, A. A., Clark, O. H. AMER MEDICAL ASSOC. 1999: 818-822

    Abstract

    Intraoperative ultrasonography is more sensitive than preoperative and other intraoperative techniques for localizing insulinoma.Retrospective review.A tertiary referral center.All patients with a biochemical diagnosis of organic hyperinsulinism who were referred to University of California, San Francisco, from 1975 to 1998.Sensitivities of the localization techniques for insulinoma were evaluated.The sensitivities of tumor localization with arteriography, computed tomography, preoperative ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium, transhepatic venous sampling, palpation, and intraoperative ultrasonography were 47%, 24%, 50%, 30%, 40%, 55%, 76%, and 91%, respectively. Nine of the 11 nonpalpable and nonvisible tumors at operation were localized by intraoperative ultrasonography.The currently available preoperative localization tests are not reliable enough to be recommended when intraoperative ultrasonography is available.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000081876300004

    View details for PubMedID 10443803

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