School of Medicine


Showing 1-6 of 6 Results

  • Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Dennis Farrey Family Professor in Pediatrics, and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the Program in Human Gene Therapy and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics. Respected worldwide for his work in gene therapy for hemophilia, Dr. Kay and his laboratory focus on establishing the scientific principles and developing the technologies needed for achieving persistent and therapeutic levels of gene expression in vivo. The major disease models are hemophilia, hepatitis C, and hepatitis B viral infections.

  • Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Harry A. Oberhelman, Jr. and Mark L. Welton Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kebebew?s translational and clinical investigations have three main scientific goals: 1) to develop effective therapies for fatal, rare and neglected endocrine cancers, 2) to identify new methods, strategies and technologies for improving the diagnosis and treatment of endocrine neoplasms and the prognostication of endocrine cancers, and 3) to develop methods for precision treatment of endocrine tumors.

  • Chaitan Khosla

    Chaitan Khosla

    Director, ChEM-H, Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health.

    For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases.

    For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine.

    Recently, we initiated a collaborative program involving multiple Stanford laboratories (http://med.stanford.edu/virx.html.html) that is aimed at developing a fundamentally new approach to treating viral infections. As part of this initiative, we are developing an antiviral chemotherapy that modulates pyrimidine metabolism in the host, and also a platform to engineer immuno-modulatory glycolipids for the treatment of influenza.

  • Eric Kool

    Eric Kool

    The George A. and Hilda M. Daubert Professor in Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests ? Development of cell-permeable reagents for study and modification of RNAs
    ? Developing small-molecule probes of DNA repair pathways
    ? Design of a functional new genetic set, xDNA and xRNA (structure, function, applications)
    ? Synthesis of combinatorial fluorescent assemblies built on a DNA scaffold (oligodeoxyfluorosides, ODFs) as labels and sensors for biology and medicine

  • Shivaani Kummar

    Shivaani Kummar

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kummar?s research interests focus on developing novel therapies for cancer. She specializes in conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic driven first-in-human trials tailored to make early, informed decisions regarding the suitability of novel molecular agents for further clinical investigation. Her studies integrate genomics and laboratory correlates into early phase trials. She is interested in alternate trial designs to facilitate rational drug selection based on human data and help expedite drug development timelines. She has published numerous articles in medical journals and serves on a number of national and international scientific committees.

  • Pamela L. Kunz

    Pamela L. Kunz

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Kunz specializes in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies with an expertise in the care of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). She has developed broad investigative programs in the field of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), encompassing clinical trials, population sciences, and translational correlates. Stanford has a robust referral base for neuroendocrine tumors and has demonstrated successful accrual to clinical trials in this rare disease. She has been involved with the design, development and conduct of Phase I, II, and III clinical trials in this field. She holds a number of leadership positions in the field including Vice Chair of the Neuroendocrine Tumor Taskforce of the National Cancer institute and member of the NANETS Board of Directors. She also serves on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Neuroendocrine Tumors Guidelines Panel and the NET Working Group of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and is the founding Director of the Stanford Neuroendocrine Tumor Program, established in 2015.

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: