School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 23 Results

  • David Camarillo

    David Camarillo

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Mechanical Engineering

    Bio David B. Camarillo is Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, (by courtesy) Mechanical Engineering and Neurosurgery at Stanford University. Dr. Camarillo holds a B.S.E in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University, a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University and completed postdoctoral fellowships in Biophysics at the UCSF and Biodesign Innovation at Stanford. Dr. Camarillo worked in the surgical robotics industry at Intuitive Surgical and Hansen Medical, before launching his laboratory at Stanford in 2012. His current research focuses on precision human measurement for multiple clinical and physiological areas including the brain, heart, lungs, and reproductive system. Dr. Camarillo has been awarded the Hellman Fellowship, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program award, among other honors including multiple best paper awards in brain injury and robotic surgery. His research has been funded by the NIH, NSF, DoD, as well as corporations and private philanthropy. His lab?s research has been featured on NPR, the New York Times, The Washington Post, Science News, ESPN, and TED.com as well as other media outlets aimed at education of the public.

  • Zhijuan Cao

    Zhijuan Cao

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My current research focuses on:
    1) using optogenetic strategies to stimulate targeted neurons for brain repair after stroke.
    2) detecting the neural circuit and molecular mechanisms underlying stroke recovery.

  • Pak H. Chan

    Pak H. Chan

    The James R. Doty Professor in Neurosurgery and Neurosciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuronal death and regeneration after strokeand neural injury

  • Steven D. Chang, MD

    Steven D. Chang, MD

    Robert C. and Jeannette Powell Neurosciences Professor and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical research includes studies in the treatment of cerebrovascular disorders, such as aneurysms and AVMs, as well as the use of radiosurgery to treat tumors and vascular malformations of the brain and spine.

    Dr. Chang is C0-Director of the Cyberknife Radiosurgery Program.

    Dr. Chang is also the head of the The Stanford Neuromolecular Innovation Program with the goal of developing new technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by neurological conditions.

  • Navjot Chaudhary

    Navjot Chaudhary

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurosurgery

    Bio Navjot Chaudhary, MD, FRCSC, is a Clinical Associate Professor of Neurosurgery. She received her medical degree from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada. Dr. Chaudhary completed her neurosurgery residency at the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada and fellowships in Spine Neurosurgery and Cyberknife Radiosurgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She works primarily in CyberKnife Neurosurgery at the Stanford Cancer Center, predominantly treating patients with brain and spine tumors, brain and spine arteriovenous malformations, and trigeminal neuralgia.

    Her research interests include surgical outcomes. She has co-authored several papers relating to spine conditions, vascular malformations, and brain tumor management.

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests What distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.

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