School of Medicine


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  • Daniel Arthur Abrams

    Daniel Arthur Abrams

    Instructor, Psych/Major Laboratories and Clinical & Translational Neurosciences Incubator

    Bio Speech is a critical communication signal for the development of social skills and language function. Autism spectrum disorders affect 1 in 88 school-age children and are characterized by deficits in social communication and language skills, and many of these individuals also experience speech perception difficulties. My primary research goals are to understand the brain bases of social communication and language impairments in children with ASD, and to describe neural changes associated with remediation of these behavioral deficits. The theoretical framework that motivates my work is that impaired perception and neural decoding of speech impact social skill and language development in many children with ASD. Moreover, I believe that a grasp of these relationships is central to understanding the etiology of these disorders and will provide insight into their remediation.

    I have initiated a program of research to further our understanding of auditory brain function serving key elements of speech perception in children with ASD. The first study produced by this program of research was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and shows that children with ASD have weak brain connectivity between voice-selective regions of cortex and the distributed reward circuit and amygdala. Moreover, the strength of these speech-reward brain connections predicts social communication abilities in these children. These results provide novel support for the hypothesis that deficits in representing the reward value of social stimuli, including speech, impede children with ASD from actively engaging with these stimuli and consequently impair social skill development. My future research will leverage this finding by probing this aberrant brain circuit in detailed explorations of speech perception in children with ASD. An important component of my future research is to explore neural plasticity associated with training programs designed to ameliorate social communication deficits in children with ASD, with a focus on the speech-reward brain circuit identified in my recent publication. In addition to my interest in studying social communication and language impairments in children with ASD, my research program also includes investigating the relationship between speech perception impairments and phonological and reading difficulties in children with reading disorders (RD). This work is a continuation of my dissertation work, which examined neural decoding of temporal features in speech in children with RD.

  • Emma Adair

    Emma Adair

    Clinical Research Manager, Neurosurgery

    Current Role at Stanford Emma co-manages the Neurology & Neurosurgery Clinical Trials Team consisting of 17 Clinical Research Coordinators conducting 70+ clinical trials in areas including: Device Neurosurgery, Functional Neurosurgery, Headache, Epilepsy, Neuroimmunology, Alzheimers/Memory Disorders, Parkinson's, Radiology, and Bio Banks.

  • Meagan Adams

    Meagan Adams

    Clinical Research Coordinator Associate, Neurology

    Current Role at Stanford 2017
    Clinical Research Coordinator, Stanford ADRC & Pacific Udall Center

  • Maheen Mausoof Adamson

    Maheen Mausoof Adamson

    Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated) [VAPAHCS], Neurosurgery

    Bio Dr. Maheen Mausoof Adamson is the senior scientific research director for DVBIC at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. She is also the clinical associate professor of Neurosurgery and Psychiatry and Behavioral sciences at Stanford University. Adamson completed her undergraduate degrees in neurobiology and women studies at University of California, Irvine. She completed her Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Southern California and a postdoctoral fellowship in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford School of Medicine.

    Dr. Adamson?s expertise and interests span employing translational neuroscience methodologies for diagnostic and therapeutic treatments (mainly repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in mild and moderate Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), including structural and functional changes in the brain in both Veteran, active military and civilian population. She currently serves as PI or Co-I on several Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense funded grants.

    Dr. Adamson has authored numerous peer-reviewed publications on cognitive and neural basis of Alzheimer?s disease and TBI, has received recognition in national and international settings and is a frequent presenter at national and international conferences. She is also intricately involved in mentoring research and clinical fellows in the psychiatry and neurosurgery departments at Stanford. Her long-term goal is to integrate advanced treatment and diagnostics into standard-of-care provided to veterans and military personnel to improve their daily function and reintegration into society.

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